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Old April 2, 2011, 02:21 AM   #26
AZAK
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Spending time here on TFL is great exercise, my fingers have never been stronger!

Oh, and round is a shape!

Seriously, I get out pretty much daily hiking, recurve bow and firearms shooting, hunting, living in Alaska can be pretty physically demanding (big depending on what you do and where you live in Alaska).

Not to mention the other forms of exercise that I do; so I will not...
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Old April 2, 2011, 02:34 AM   #27
irish52084
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Weighed myself last night and it wasn't good. I hit 280, so that means I've gained 42 lbs since my son was born last march. It's time to save a few dollars and hire a personal trainer again. I also need to get my butt back into my submission grappling/Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu classes again.

I hired personal trainer 2 years ago to help me get back into grappling shape after tearing my MCL and it was worth every penny, drop of sweat and muttered curse. I ran the quickest 40 yard dash in my life, 4.62 seconds, at 250 lbs. I was stunned at the results I got in 2 one hour sessions a week for 7 weeks. My cardio went through the roof and my training partners even noticed how strong I felt coming off an injury that didn't allow me to train for an extended time.

I've always been into martial arts for fun and defense, but being in good physical shape s an important factor, it makes everything easier. The more diverse your training the better. It makes it more fun and allows you to train your body to recruit muscles you wouldn't normally train. Looking good and strong is great, but functional strength trumps all else. Moving a person who is fighting you is incredibly difficult and you may have to do it in a self defense scenario.
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Old April 2, 2011, 05:01 AM   #28
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Oh yes. I've been running and lifting weights since I was 18; I'm 43 now. The heart and also breathing rate accelerate madly under stress [particularly the stress of a physical or armed encounter] so it makes sense that if you're already in great shape you'll handle it better. Also, check out the "Captains Of Crush" hand grippers available at www.ironmind.com. These industrial strength hand grippers are tougher to squeeze closed than any you'll find at Wal-Mart..and my grip has never been stronger. Plus, what it's done to improve my handgun shooting is very noticeable. Give 'em a whirl yourself and you'll see what I mean.
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Old April 2, 2011, 08:17 AM   #29
garryc
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I do it because there is the very real chance of having to go 'hands-on' with an attacker to get enough space to draw (or to escape).

BINGO!! That is exactly correct. Plus the fact that the unarmed defense may make the use of lethal force unnecessary. Everyone should know at least basic blocks and escapes. That and knife defense moves (I know an officer who will make that guy eat his own blade, while it's in his own hand, every time)

Besides, there's just something priceless about face flopping an attacker. I had one inmate jump at me at the top of some steps. I arm barred him and he rode those steps down on his face. Cuffing him was rather simple, especially since his shoulder was dislocated. I weigh 280 pounds, not what you want hyper extending your elbow.

I had another inmate that tried to slash me across the throat with a razor blade in a tooth brush. He actually cut me in the shoulder. I kneed him in the abdomen and then delivered a hammer blow to the back of his head. We both went to the hospital on that one.

The point is, when a use of force is necessary don't hold back. Nail him as hard as you can as fast as you can. Back down while he is still capable of bringing force and you could be dead. Dominate the situation.
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Old April 4, 2011, 09:43 AM   #30
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I do PT just to stay healthy and in shape. it sure doesn't hurt the cause of self defense, plus it feels great to be in shape.
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Old April 7, 2011, 11:50 PM   #31
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I need to start a proper PT regimen again. Fortunately I have kept my caloric intake and quality of food pretty consistent. However, with my new job I just stay too tired to really work out.

I have noticed my groups getting larger when I shoot. I think a lot of it is a result of weaker arms and hands. The more I worked out the better I controlled the gun and the better I shot. Less working out and less practice lead to bad follow through and form.
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Old April 8, 2011, 04:43 AM   #32
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For those who say they limit themselves to one glass of adult beverages a day, you must not of seen the bottle a day for those who are commonly assosciated with the term PT. That, or you just a heck of a lot wiser then us

Anyone who has some health or weight issues and looking to keep some sort of good shape, I HIGHLY reccomend getting into a pool. I was on a swim team for roughly 10-12 years and it was the best shape I was ever in, even after almost 4 years of the military. It's low impact and you get a workout even if you have to take it easy at first. Plus, it'll help with your breathing control
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Old April 8, 2011, 06:09 AM   #33
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When I got back after my last tour I developed an odd heart condition and could do no PT. The only real exercise I got was two miles of walking a day.

I gained 40 pounds in six months.

Turned out the condition was treatable and I started the PT again about a year later.

I lost 43 pound in six months.

Being fat is absolutely no joy or pleasure. I don't know how people do it. I still had strength but could barely run and had no endurance. I could hardly bike either as bikes are not designed for 265 pound people. The bike would literally rattle apart under the stress and require constant maintenance due to me overloading it with my girth.

It seems to me to be a miserable existence. So I would say if you can exercise by all means do. I don't know if it will help your shooting any but it sure can't hurt anything.
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Old April 8, 2011, 11:32 AM   #34
old bear
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Will, I hate you. No really good for you. I can only wish I had your dedication to really get back into shape. Retirement can be hard in more than one way.

Keep it up.
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Old April 8, 2011, 07:16 PM   #35
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For the last 25 years, I've made it my policy to stay in good enough shape to do my age in straight, military PT pushups on my birthday. I turned 65 last February. It doesn't get any harder if you stay with it.

Now, I can do 100 pushups in 3 minutes and 15 dead-hang pullups. I'm sure that's partly responsible for the fact that I'm shooting better now than when I was 30.
You, sir, are freaking AWESOME!!!!

My P.T. program revolves around an over all life strategy as opposed to a purely defensive strategy.

As a service member, being "physically strong", and moving "further and faster" was a part of the job description.

Now that I am no longer in that line of work, and getting a little long in the tooth, I have found that I feel WORSE if I DON'T do P.T. than when I do. So while the intensity and time may have decreased a bit, I have increased the frequency, and do P.T. every single day.

Fitness is certainly an attribute in defensive situations, and any other physical endeavor, however, I feel the biggest benefit, and the MOST important, is in how fitness enhances the over all quality of life.
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Old April 9, 2011, 08:59 AM   #36
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Now that I am no longer in that line of work, and getting a little long in the tooth, I have found that I feel WORSE if I DON'T do P.T. than when I do.
Yep. No question about it.

If I don't do my core exercises, I get lower back spasms and my flexibility suffers. If I don’t do my cardio, my abs disappear under a layer of fat.

In my experience, the key to staying in shape isn’t doing an endless series of isolation exercises, it’s doing a small number of compound exercises that mimic the movements you’d have to do if you really needed to perform in an emergency, plus the exercises you need to keep your core muscles in top shape, plus cardio.

For anyone who cares, here’s my weekly routine:

Monday and Friday:
Some light stretching, followed by one set of 100 pushups. Goal=minimum of 65 (my current age) in 90 sec and 100 in 3 minutes.
Nautilus pullup machine: 15 dead-hang pullups (knee pad locked down), 15 pullups @ -50 lbs, 15 pullups @ -65 lbs.
Nautilus crunch machine: 50 reps @ my body weight.
Nautilus lower back machine: 50 reps @ my body weight.
30 minutes on the treadmill @ 3.6 mph and 6% incline.

Wednesday:
Nautilus leg press machine: 15 reps @ 300, 15 reps @ 360, 15 reps @ 400.
Cable twists: (don’t know who made the equipment) 3 sets of 25 reps @ 10 lbs.
30 minutes on the treadmill @ 3.6 mph and 6% incline.

I finish every workout with five 3 minute rounds on the speed bag. That’s just for fun.

That’s it. I’m in and out of the gym in under an hour and a half.
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Old April 9, 2011, 12:58 PM   #37
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Anyone who has some health or weight issues and looking to keep some sort of good shape, I HIGHLY reccomend getting into a pool.
I used to think that also, especially after having a pool from the time I was 12 until I was married. When I was a kid, you couldn't get me out of the water. But I went back to a pool at 48 or so and did nothing but laps for 6 months, rather than float around and pretend like some of the guys at our gym. I did them to absolute exhaustion 3 days a week to see what it would do for me. It did nothing; I lost no weight, my breathing didn't improve, and I didn't really even feel any more limber than before. Total disappointment. I expect it would have to be better than nothing, but I get better results with simply 5 minutes of treadmill and a workout. It must depend on age and body type, but I'm done with pools. I would tell anyone to try it, but if it hasn't done anything for you after 2 months, it likely won't.
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Old April 9, 2011, 01:53 PM   #38
kaylorinhi
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Something for everybody

For those with movement difficulties I would suggest starting with some Yoga and Tai-Chi, also the "Airplane" exercises are good for those of you constrained to cubicles!

I was lucky to be in decent shape before a shoulder injury 6 years ago and surgery on said shoulder 4 years ago but what I learned doing research and listening to my Physical Therapy Doc's was amazing. My left shoulder is still an Achillies Heel for me but I am getting better daily.
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Old April 9, 2011, 07:53 PM   #39
Japle
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Many of you feel the need to carry a CCW thinking your life is in danger, however, you can't seem to take care of your personal health which will probably be the death of you. Its not only a good idea from a tactical standpoint to do a little exercise...its just an all around good idea to shed the weight and get in-shape or at least do some type of minimal exercise to keep yourself in check.
I see guys at the gym who are severely overweight. I want to ask them, what was the thing that told you to lose that weight?
Didn't you notice when your waist passed 40 inches?
Didn't you notice when you couldn't fit into any of your clothes?
Didn't you notice when you lost two inches of your penis under all that fat?

Now their problem is they're so out of shape they have to use weights most of us would laugh at.
They're embarrassed by the fact they can’t do a single pushup or pullup. They can’t do bench presses with just the bar. They can’t bend over far enough to do deadlifts. They’d kill themselves trying to do a squat. So, they spend their time in the Nautilus room, because no one can see what tiny weights they’re using. I see them crank out 15 reps with light weight and then move the pin down so it’ll look like they were actually working. They get on the treadmill and mosey along at 2.5 mph and zero incline, sweating like mad.

It’s like timetohunt said; they’re going to die of neglect long before anyone can kill them.
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Old April 9, 2011, 10:22 PM   #40
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For those with movement difficulties I would suggest starting with some Yoga and Tai-Chi,
I work out, so I don't have movement difficulties, but I am looking for a center that teaches Tai-Chi when I move, as I understand it to be one of the best stress relievers.
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Old April 10, 2011, 10:12 AM   #41
mnero
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My job keeps me in decent shape, but I gotta say GOOD for Beararms; giving up soda and beer wow I just don't have the will to do it and I have tried lol>
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Old April 11, 2011, 04:09 AM   #42
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If you cant run 3 miles or do some pullups, then you should question whether you are qualified for military service.


What does running three miles have to do with combat or military service?

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Im not sure what they do in today's Army, but it certainly does not seem the same.
It likely is not.
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Old April 11, 2011, 07:08 AM   #43
spacecoast
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What does running three miles have to do with combat or military service?
Directly, probably not much, but it implies a level of fitness and personal responsibility that should be a part of every service member's life (same applies to firemen/women, paramedics, LEOs, etc.) Being able to run 3 miles (or alternatively, 30 minutes without stopping) is not that big a deal, no matter if you are 15 or 65. For those whose knees preclude running, there are other ways of demonstrating a similar level of fitness.
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Old April 11, 2011, 12:04 PM   #44
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After 23 years I have yet to see a single soldier run three miles, unarmed, unequipped wearing gym shorts and a T-shirt through a battle. Maybe it happened in that old army.

A much better indicator of performance would be a 12 mile march with full kit, weapon and ruck sack. Also a test that indicated what soldiers could do in short bursts, such as rushing a building, clearing a room, capturing an enemy. These things would be much more important than jogging three miles.

Sorry for the detour.

What I am trying to get at is that new PT test (which there is a lot more of than indicated here) is designed around short bursts of high energy activity and not slower long haul activity. This is a much more useful type of measurement of performance under stress.
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Old April 11, 2011, 01:37 PM   #45
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Firearms, and PT, are but two parts of my overall health and well-being strategy.

Run, swim, lift, play sports, eat right, get plenty of rest. Laugh often and be happy.

****************************************

For those questioning the logic behind the Army PFT, I suggest browsing FM 25-100, FM 21-10, and FM 7-0.

Although the above post hit the nail on the head.

For "Soldier/NCO of the Command/Year/etc" they do include many skill-based tests, in addition to a basic PFT, weapon certification, and a grilling panel interview with Senior NCOs.

Many law enforcement agencies (granted they operate differently) have gone to shorter "long" runs and more burst events. For example, the current FBI PFT includes a minute of max situps, 300m sprint, maximum untimed pushups, and a 1.5 mile run, with max pullups for HRT candidates. There's a minimum requirement, but it's just that, the bare minimum to scrape through.

I've seen some agencies including shuttle runs and other measures of physical fitness, agility, and overall athleticism.

Last edited by booker_t; April 11, 2011 at 01:54 PM.
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Old April 11, 2011, 01:47 PM   #46
TeamSinglestack
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Most people who work and have a family dont have the time to devote to long runs and intensive training which is understandable.
Neither long runs, intensive training, or equipment are required for individual fitness, and even 30 minutes a day is enough to develop or maintain healthy muscle tone and cardio conditioning.

Quote:
It seems to me the US Army has softened up its standards probably because it could not get enough recruits to pass the old fitness test. That is honestly a disgrace.
I can't speak for the Corps, but in the Army, the tail wags the dog. The overwhelming majority of Army individuals hold specialties that do NOT require the physical and mental toughness required of fighters, so rather than set standards that would accommodate the limited number of fighters, the Army opts to set their standards for those that "fight" from behind the walls of a FOB, or in an office / TOC behind a computer screen.

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What does running three miles have to do with combat or military service.
Seeing as how fire and maneuver is the concept pretty much EVERY offensive military operation is based on, I would say running would fall into the "maneuver" part of that concept.

Running the short distance required of the Army, and the Corps, demonstrates a BASIC level of cardio fitness that can more easily be built on to perform the more demanding tasks of combat. Long range movements and foot patrols in difficult terrain, under a load, are much easier to perform, adapt to, and recover from, when individuals have a good foundation established through running.

This foundation also supports an assaulters' ability to maneuver to positions of advantage that allow him to close with and destroy enemy positions. Troops can only carry so much ammo, and can sustain fire for a relatively limited amount of time, so it becomes crucial that a maneuver element is capable of moving to a new assault OR support position as fast as possible. That means RUNNING.

While most of the military will NEVER have to fire and maneuver due to having non-combat duty positions, those of us that did / do will need to have the leg and cardio strength and endurance that "running three miles" helps to build and maintain. Running helps to set the conditions for success and survival on the battle field (not the FOB/TOC/motor pool/aid station), and THAT has a LOT to do with combat and military service, whether anyone realizes it or not.
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Old April 11, 2011, 01:58 PM   #47
booker_t
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For those who say they don't have the time, look up a gentleman by the name of David Goggins.

33 years old.

Full time, he's a Navy SEAL.

He's married with a family.

In his SPARE time, he runs ultra marathons (100 and 150 miles), performs 500-mile bike rides, and does other extreme endurance sports. This was after he quit being a powerlifter, and lost a ton of weight.

Now, what excuses do you have?
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Old April 11, 2011, 02:32 PM   #48
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I was involved in a serious car accident once, and the injuries left me with some serious physical limitations. Fortunately, my quality of life is good, but I won't last long in a hand-to-hand confrontation.

As such, I've had to change strategies. I have prior training in Aikido (which doesn't place much emphasis on strength), and some of those techniques are viable, but for the most part, I'll be more heavily dependent on a firearm should things go that terribly.

Those three cups of coffee a day do grant me catlike reflexes, however.
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Old April 11, 2011, 03:49 PM   #49
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The ability to run three miles is a start but hardly enough. In AIT 5 miles is a standard run and you will run further. Don't worry if you are out of shape, after boot camp, you won't be. If you are a Marine, an Infantry man or a Navy corpsman; you will then go to advanced infantry training(ait) after that you will have little trouble running 3 miles or 5 miles; assuming you are healthy of course. So what does running three miles have to do with the military? Nothing if you are lucky enough to avoid deployment over-seas; everything if you aren't!
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Old April 11, 2011, 05:56 PM   #50
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Definitely PT helps, imo.

Especially cardio since it makes the heart more efficient, beating less during rest and shooting sport times. The breath becomes calmer, which can also improve shooting scores.

I do running, bicycling, stairclimbing.
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