The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 20, 2011, 04:20 PM   #1
waltfraz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 23, 2008
Posts: 174
Removing scratches in stainless

I have a revolver that is stainless and has a couple of real light scratches in it from previous owner and I would like to clean them up.T hey are so light you can hardly see them but they bother me.
waltfraz is offline  
Old March 20, 2011, 05:17 PM   #2
brickeyee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 29, 2004
Posts: 3,342
Quote:
I have a revolver that is stainless and has a couple of real light scratches in it from previous owner and I would like to clean them up.T hey are so light you can hardly see them but they bother me.
What is the overall finish?

Brushed?

High polish?

High polish is sometimes easier, but even brushed can be 'cleaned up.'

Polish out the scratches (to high polish), then as needed add new scratches to produce a matching 'brushed' finish.

Non-woven abrasives are your friend.
brickeyee is offline  
Old March 20, 2011, 05:50 PM   #3
waltfraz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 23, 2008
Posts: 174
It's a dan wesson I would call it a brushed finish,what are woven abrasives?
waltfraz is offline  
Old March 20, 2011, 06:25 PM   #4
HiBC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 13, 2006
Posts: 3,521
I would use the 3M scotchbrite type pads,the maroon color.
HiBC is offline  
Old March 20, 2011, 10:04 PM   #5
ClydeFrog
Junior member
 
Join Date: May 1, 2010
Posts: 5,798
Good products for minor scratch/scuffs/nicks...

I had a Ruger GPNY .38spl that got a few small scuffs & scratches from security duty use.
I was advised to get 800/1000/1200 grade auto body type sandpaper. Other forum posts suggested using Flitz or Mothers Chrome-Mag Wheel Polish.

I also read a interesting post about a airline industry mesh that is used to remove nicks & scuffs. That may work too. I'll post the product name if I can get it.

Clyde
ClydeFrog is offline  
Old March 20, 2011, 10:36 PM   #6
waltfraz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 23, 2008
Posts: 174
Some one said to use pencil eracer but I don't want to experiment on my gun
waltfraz is offline  
Old March 21, 2011, 02:49 PM   #7
brickeyee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 29, 2004
Posts: 3,342
Non-woven abrasives is the more generic name for Scotch-brite pads.

The real 3M ones are usually better, but if you need a number of 'grits' it can gets pricey to get a box of each one.
brickeyee is offline  
Old March 22, 2011, 01:13 AM   #8
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
Quote:
I also read a interesting post about a airline industry mesh that is used to remove nicks & scuffs. That may work too. I'll post the product name if I can get it.
It's just a mesh version of emery cloth. The 'mesh' design is to slow down the removal of soft metals, and allow a view of the surface while working it. It also resists folding, to prevent creating creases. But... it does not play nicely around sharp edges, corners, or screws, and is harder to maintain a flat profile with. (These attributes are not an issue on aircraft, as it's generally used to blend cracks, nicks, abrasions, and other potential fracture/tear points - where you WANT a rounded profile.)

Normal emery cloth was better for all non-aircraft work I have ever done, as it's snag-free, and easier to prevent 'dishing' the surface with.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old March 23, 2011, 08:49 PM   #9
tazbigdog
Member
 
Join Date: March 7, 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 43
I like simichrome. Slightly abrasive and yet shines to a mirror finish. Have used it on guns and swords. Good luck! Jeff
__________________
"It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience." Julius Caesar
tazbigdog is offline  
Old March 23, 2011, 09:35 PM   #10
guy sajer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 7, 2002
Location: Ohio
Posts: 328
Scotchbrite as mentioned above is the best I've found . Make sure you press lightly and go with the existing brushed/"grain" direction .
__________________
Mitch

Please visit Olde English Outfitters

RIP John Forsyth
guy sajer is offline  
Old March 24, 2011, 01:40 PM   #11
G. Freeman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 1, 2001
Location: Walnut, California
Posts: 153
Please take a look at this thread. Read the comments from Birdieshooter.
http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=300911

From the info here, I bought some maroon and light gray scuff pads. You can get this from any auto detail supply store. I didn't even buy the Scotchbrite brand (couldn't find them locally); just got the OEM brand (Mirka mirlon, and there's other OEM brands out there).

For light scratch removal, all you need is the light gray. If you have some deeper ones (such as the idiot mark on my 1911), I used the maroon one first, then blend with the light gray.

Follow the grain of the finish. You will be amazed with the results. The resulting finish will be a satin stainless finish just like what you see on the Ruger firearms or the stainless springfield 1911's.
G. Freeman is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08420 seconds with 7 queries