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Old May 2, 2011, 06:17 PM   #51
Eghad
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Well if you decide to get into SASS you are looking at the clothes, two pistols, holsters and a belt and a rifle plus a shotgun. So starting out a Puma would be priced right.
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Old May 5, 2011, 01:54 PM   #52
Frontier
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"Puma" was Rossi's trade name for their '92 repro in the early days. They took the cat's head badge off the side of the receiver and dropped the Puma name - probably something to do with CAS.
The 1892 copies made in Italy by Armi Chiappa are closer to the Winchester from the point of view of the action. The Rossi uses a coil mainspring while the AC has a more authentic flat spring. Right out of the box the Armi Chiappa is as slick as a whistle and the fit and finish is super. Yes, the Rossi is a good little rifle, but you get what you pay for.

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Old May 13, 2011, 07:49 PM   #53
torquewrench
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Got my 92 back from rossi

Now I t hit a foot high and a foot to the left. Nice warranty. I called rossi and got to speak to rap nasty ghetto mama. Rossi move your call center to India like everyone else. At least I have a shot at understandimg the operators. Final assessmemt of rossi. You suck.
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Old May 27, 2011, 05:04 PM   #54
Red Cent
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The 92 is a cool looking rifle. Watch the movies and you will see them in all kinds of disguise. Watched Gregory Peck use a wannabe Henry that looked suspiciously like a 92. How come they take the fore ends off? Do they think we don't know? Stupid.
You know, the '92 and the '94 was built for bottle neck kinda long blackpowder cartridges. The '94 ushered in the smokeless. They are strong actions. The 38-55 and later the 30-30 were pretty hard hitting rounds. I have a Marlin 38-55.

But they are not meant to be ran as fast as the Cowboy shooter can go. As stated, you had better go from this wall of the cycle to this wall of the cycle or else it won't go.

As a cowboy shooter for a number of years I have seen the beginners buy without talking to anyone, asking questions, or shooting the cowboys guns that would have been shoved upon them if they would have asked. The guns they bought were soon recognized as the ones for sale on the cowboy websites.

Before the old timers get bent, let me say that I will be seventy in October. I started in 2000 (I think). And I am a gamer. Before the osteo-arthritis and plain ol' arthritis set in, I shot every Saturday and Sunday, every state match up and down the east coast, NE Regional and the SE Regional for years. And I have been to NM.

Having said all of that, I feel it necessary to advise the beginning cowboy. I have seen many cowboys struggling financially buy all the inexpensive stuff and discover that they cannot compete. I know, I know, it ain't about winning right? Bull.

If they want to buy guns, clothes, boots, hats, leather, reloading equipment, and all the components just to have fun, then so be it.

I was lucky and fell into a bunch of pros. My starting guns were a pair of nickle Colts 4 3/4", an 1873, and a M97 (totally tricked out by the best). I changed to 3 screws and kept the rest.

If you want to really compete, then buy a pair of Ruger Vaqueros 4 5/8", a Marlin lever gun, and a M97. Pay to have them tricked out.

Am I still invited?
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Old May 27, 2011, 11:05 PM   #55
Hawg Haggen
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Quote:
You know, the '92 and the '94 was built for bottle neck kinda long blackpowder cartridges.
The 92 was chambered for bottle necked cartridges but they weren't longish. They were all pistol cartridges except for the 218 Bee which was based on a 25-20. original chamberings were .32-20, .38-40, .44-40, .25-20, .218 Bee. The 218 wasn't used until 1936.
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