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Old February 2, 2011, 09:49 PM   #1
steve riley
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Smith and wesson 38 special ctg serial number

I have just recently aquired a s&w 38 special ctg. It was given to me by a relative. Im already in love with this gun and it is my new favorite pistol i own. So i was wanting to see if any of you guys could tell me a little more info on this gun because i am not very familiar with s&w 38 special or what ctg even means. Anyways i guess my main question is what year was the gun made and what could the gun be worth. So far everything i know is serial number is D610xxx, it is stainless steel, wooden service grips with s&w logo in gold, no scrathes almost brand new looking and in very good condition other than a small splinter on the left grip, non adjustible sights, and not snub nose. Other than the two major questions i ask, any other info would be great, thanks.
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Old February 2, 2011, 10:38 PM   #2
Nomadicone
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Well ctg stands for Cartridge. Meaning 38 Special Cartridge. To answer some of your other questions we know more about the gun. Model...it will be found on the yoke after you swing the cylinder open. The model will be followed in all likelihood by a - and another number. For example it might say Mod 66-6. As far as date produced, someone else will have to answer that.
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Old February 2, 2011, 10:39 PM   #3
DPris
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You have a Smith & Wesson .38 Special revolver, probably stainless, possibly plated, possibly a Model 64, possibly a Model 60 in some variation.
Value is dependent on condition.
Photos would help.
CTG stands for cartridge.
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Old February 2, 2011, 10:57 PM   #4
carguychris
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The "D" prefix indicates that it's a Model 10 (steel frame) or Model 12 (aluminum alloy frame). According to the Standard Catalog of S&W, the 610xxx serial number range is 1973-1974 production. The gun should have nickel finish, not stainless; the serial prefix is wrong for a stainless S&W revolver from this time period.

In the condition you describe, a nickel Model 10 would be worth $250-$325 with the relatively common 4" or 6" barrels, ~$25 more with the uncommon 5" barrel, and up to $100-$150 more with the rare 3" barrel which was only offered by special order in this era. The correct numbers-matching box, documents, and tool kit will add $50-$75 to the value.

A Model 12 will be worth ~$100 more than the Model 10 value. Since you say the gun is "not snub nose", it should have a 4" barrel; M12 lengths other than 2" and 4" are rare to the point of near-nonexistence.

FWIW original factory nickel can be identified by color case finish on the hammer and trigger, blued finish on the ejector star and ejector rod, and natural metal on the cylinder pawls. Poorly-done refinishing can usually be identified by nickel plating in these areas; unfortunately, poorly-done renickeling jobs were common in the 70s and earlier. This will typically knock the gun's value down by ~30%.
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Old February 2, 2011, 11:02 PM   #5
steve riley
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more info on S&W

Thanks for the info so far but to answer your question it is a mod.64 then right under the hinge is a large S and the numbers 63280. Does that mean it was made in 1964? As for pictures i will submit some tomorrow because my camers is dead so could you please check back with me tomorrow on the thread becasue like i said the gun is in realy realy good condition. I basically want to get a ball park idea because my buddy just bought a glock 30 for $490 and i want to rub it in his face that I just got this s&w for free from my uncle.
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Old February 2, 2011, 11:19 PM   #6
steve riley
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It is a 3" barrel. The reason i said it was not a snub nose is because i rememberd my dad having a 38 sp snub nose and it looked alot smaller, but it could have been a lady smith.
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Old February 2, 2011, 11:24 PM   #7
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Don't make fun of the glocksters, they just get intransigent and more stuck in there ways.

Just get lessons and practice a lot with your gun. Shooting better is the best revenge.
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Old February 2, 2011, 11:30 PM   #8
steve riley
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That is the best part of it is that at the range i blow him out of the water in accuracy. Plus his reload time is two to threee times longer than mine, but he also gets ten while i only get six. But it only takes one.
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Old February 3, 2011, 12:47 AM   #9
Crazy88Fingers
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Sounds like a model 64 alright. It's a stainless steel version of the model 10. I have one with a D64xxxx serial number that was made in '73-'74. Yours is in the same range. This model first came out around 1970. The 64 doesn't really signify anything, it was probably just the next number up. And it's most likely the standard 4" barrel. Are you measuring the barrel length from the front face of the cylinder or the frame?

A good ballpark figure for the gun is in the $300 range, with about one-hundred-and-one variables that will move the price up or down. And yes, these are very accurate guns.
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Old February 3, 2011, 12:49 AM   #10
DPris
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If it's stamped Model 64 then it's a Model 64. That's not the year it was made.
Value in good shape is probably around $300-$400, could go slightly higher in some areas of the country.
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Old February 5, 2011, 01:23 AM   #11
BillCA
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You have a Model 64 - .38 Special Military & Police, Stainless revolver. This is a stainless steel implementation of the venerable Model 10 M&P revolver and traces its lineage all the way back to 1899.

S&W started producing stainless K-Frame revolvers like yours in 1970. Yours would have a round tapered barrel ("pencil barrel") with a fixed stainless steel sight in front. It holds six rounds of .38 Special ammo and can be fired with +P ammo, although that will acellerate wear somewhat. Factory wood "Magna" grips with the S&W logo are of walnut and tightly fit the grip frame. Larger "target" grips were an option from S&W. Aftermarket grips can be had to give a better grip if needed.

The .38 Special cartridge ("ctg") was invented circa 1899. The bullet diameter is actually 0.357", the same as the .357 Magnum cartridge. (No, you cannot shoot .357 Magnums or .38's hot loaded like a Magnum in your gun without it rapidly disassembling in your hand). In it's standard form of a 158gr RNL or LSWC bullet at under 800 fps is merely "adequate" for the task of self-defense (but can be "excellent" if the shooter is well practiced and accurate).
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Old February 5, 2011, 01:42 AM   #12
Rufus T Firefly
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Read the value with some trepidation.

The Police and Service models were produced in mass. Tons of them around. Rare? No. check gun broker type sites for current value. Free advice on the value is worth what you paid for the free advice. I have a Naval Aviator Model 10 on the way. Could be worth $100 or maybe upwards of $500. Depends on the markings and rarity. Original holster included? Military marks that make it rare? Pitting in the barrel? Lots of variables. Any paper work included? Mine will have to have the Naval Mark on it. Otherwise another $100 - $200 gun. It's kinda like buying a 1966 Mustang. Then you take off the valve covers and find out it was made in 1965.
Good Luck and hope you got a good one.
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