The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Semi-automatic Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 26, 2011, 10:37 AM   #1
jpsshack
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2008
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 148
Dry-firing a Mark II/expert opinions

This comment only relates to the Ruger–I'm aware of the common knowledge regarding dry-firing and rimfire guns.That said, I was told I could dry-fire my Ruger Mark II all day with no snap-caps and no ill effects. What is it about their design that tolerates this?

Last edited by jpsshack; January 26, 2011 at 10:53 AM.
jpsshack is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 10:41 AM   #2
Sixer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 16, 2008
Location: Missouri
Posts: 1,891
I've always been told not to dry fire your rimfire guns... the firing pin is going to hit on the side of the chamber and cause potential damage.

Not sure if there's any truth to that, but it kinda makes sense
__________________
Hopp Custom Leather <------ click for HOLSTER awesomeness!!

-There is no theory of evolution... Just a list of creatures Chuck Norris has allowed to live.
Sixer is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 10:45 AM   #3
jpsshack
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2008
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 148
Yeah, that's what I'd always been told, too. However, the guy that told me this is a hardcore shooter and I have every reason to trust him on anything gun related.

Last edited by jpsshack; January 26, 2011 at 10:56 AM.
jpsshack is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 11:02 AM   #4
Japle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 12, 2004
Location: Viera, Florida
Posts: 1,188
That used to be true, but not anymore. Modern .22s, certainly including the Ruger automatics, have firing pins that are designed for dry-fire. They have a built-in stop that keeps them from hitting the chamber mouth.

My old Mossberg 144LSA target rifle has a firing pin that will damage the chamber. I always used a fired case as a snap-cap.

You can dry-fire a Mk II as much as you want. I've been doing it for many years with no damage.
Japle is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 11:40 AM   #5
jpsshack
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2008
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 148
Ah! a built in stop. That's the missing piece.
Thanks Japle. I'll stop saving my .22 cases now.
jpsshack is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 12:28 PM   #6
doofus47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 9, 2010
Location: live in a in a house when i'm not in a tent
Posts: 1,353
Quote:
I've always been told not to dry fire your rimfire guns... the firing pin is going to hit on the side of the chamber and cause potential damage. v
Absolutely true; I buggered up the extraction of my Marlin 2000 biathlon rifle by dry firing. My gunsmith told me he was going to beat me with rolled up issues of GnA if I did it again....
doofus47 is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 01:31 PM   #7
scottl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 17, 2007
Location: Morehead,Ky
Posts: 751
I've seen pics over at rimfirecentral of boogered up chambers from dry-fire.One was even of a new Buckmark guy had just bought and not even fired.It had a light mark on it.
scottl is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 01:46 PM   #8
pilpens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 24, 2008
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,421
Depends on pistol but in general it is not a good to dry fire.

I currently have two browning buckmarks. 1 seems like it has a firing pin stop (accidentally dry-fired a couple of times and no marks on the chamber) but the later manufacture does not.

I have Ruger MKIIs - I do not dry-fire for practice but after cleaning and after a range trip, they get dry-fired. One is clean- no marks on the chamber. The other one has a deep firing pin mark/guage on the chamber -- dry-fired when I assembled the pistol without the firing pin bar. Pistol performs same as before the gauge (.
pilpens is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 03:36 PM   #9
MythBuster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 8, 2007
Posts: 629
It is harmful to some rimfires and some it is not. It will not harm your Ruger.
MythBuster is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 04:06 PM   #10
Kleinzeit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 30, 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 562
Does anyone have pictures of the damage dry-firing can do? If I was buying a used Buckmark, what would I be looking out for? Actually, my concern isn't with a used Buckmark so much as with a new one out of the LGS display case. I'm concerned about customers having dry-fired it in the store before I got to it.
Kleinzeit is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 04:17 PM   #11
PDW292
Member
 
Join Date: January 3, 2011
Posts: 60
When you can get a dozen snap caps for about $5, why take a chance.
PDW292 is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 05:31 PM   #12
Mike38
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2009
Location: North Central Illinois
Posts: 1,190
If memory serves me, on a Ruger .22 pistol the only thing stopping the firing pin from damaging the breech face is a small dole pin that crosses threw the firing pin. If the bolt is assembled minus that pin, or the pin breaks (and they have) damage will result. I don’t dry fire Ruger .22’s.
Mike38 is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 05:45 PM   #13
Walt Sherrill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 15, 1999
Location: Winston-Salem, NC USA
Posts: 4,613
I've had a number of Ruger .22 semis, and they all have firing pin stops, which allows dry-firing without damage. A few other .22s have this too, but it's rare. (I think the S&W 41 does it, too.)

And, of course, you HAVE to dry-fire the MK II during assembly*. The manual calls for it.

----
* I wrote assembly, but as noted below, it's disassembly that requires dry-firing. (I remember it was a required step, but forgot WHEN the step was needed.) Haven't shot mine in a while...

Last edited by Walt Sherrill; January 26, 2011 at 10:02 PM.
Walt Sherrill is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 09:48 PM   #14
Willie D
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 24, 2007
Posts: 1,116
From the manual:


Quote:
The pistol can be dry fired as
long as the firing pin stop is in place (See NOTE in step 5 on page 21).

...

NOTE: Before sliding bolt into
receiver, BE CERTAIN that the
firing pin stop (part number
A03500, a small pin) is in the
bolt. Without this pin, the first
time the trigger is pulled on an
assembled pistol, the firing pin
will fly so far forward so as to
irreparably dent the rear end of
the chamber of the barrel,
making the pistol useless. (See
Figure 5).


Like Walt said: you need to dry fire the gun to release the mainspring for dissasembly.
Willie D is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 10:46 PM   #15
chris in va
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2004
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 12,656
There you go. Dryfire a Ruger Mk, won't hurt it. And yes I had two.
chris in va is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 11:32 PM   #16
jpsshack
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2008
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 148
Cool. Thanks again, all.
jpsshack is offline  
Old January 26, 2011, 11:58 PM   #17
OcelotZ3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 20, 2008
Posts: 178
I just buy drywall anchors in the right size from Home Depot (the yellow ones) and use those for dry firing... Cheap and they work great.

Then I don't have to know if this gun or that gun can/cannot be dry fired...
OcelotZ3 is offline  
Old January 27, 2011, 12:30 AM   #18
OJ
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 25, 1998
Location: COLORADO SPRINGS, CO, USA
Posts: 1,570
Quote:
Japle
Senior Member


That used to be true, but not anymore. Modern .22s, certainly including the Ruger automatics, have firing pins that are designed for dry-fire. They have a built-in stop that keeps them from hitting the chamber mouth.
Yep - that's true - but only if you've been careful when stripping it down and reassembling it and checked to be sure that pin didn't drop out of the bolt during the cleaning -

DAMHIK

This one still has the pin -



This one doesn't -

__________________
OJ -
SEMPER FI -
DUTY, HONOR, COUNTRY
NRA ENDOWMENT LIFE MEMBER

Last edited by OJ; January 27, 2011 at 12:38 AM.
OJ is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10309 seconds with 7 queries