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Old January 14, 2011, 07:14 PM   #1
popeyespappy
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Validity of an old permit

When I lived in Tennessee I was issued a carry permit that on its face doesn’t expire until 2012. Two years ago I moved to Alabama and got an Alabama permit which has since been renewed once. This year I didn’t get a renewal notice for my Alabama permit by the time I thought I should so I called the Sherriff’s office which is the issuing authority to ask about it. I explained to the person on the phone that my permit expired soon, I had not received a renewal notice and that I was going to be out of state for a few weeks shortly after my current permit expired. She told me not to worry and if I didn’t get my notice in a few days to come in and they would take care of it there. So today I did just that. The problem is that she said the sherriff was going to have to sign the new permit and that they would mail it to me. That could happen and I hope it does but I leave Thursday morning so maybe not.

My question is if I don’t get my Alabama permit back before I leave is my Tennessee permit, which doesn’t expire until 2012, still valid or did it become invalid when I moved out of state?
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Old January 14, 2011, 09:48 PM   #2
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Not a lawyer, so my advice is worth what you pay for it, but generally, if you mover out of the jurisdiction (state) where the permit is issued, it becomes invalid. New York state ivalidated my pistol permit as soon as they learned I have moved out of state.

Take a look at driver's licenses. Move to another state, and they expect you to get a new license. There is some grace period, which varies with the state, but bottom line, if you now live in the new state, you have to get their license.

Similar for car tabs. You move to another state, and you have a limited amount of time to register your car in the new state. 30-60-90 days, or whatever, but you must register your car in the new state, if you live there. And you cannot wait until your old tabs expire. Get stopped, and have been living instate for say 3 months, and still have 6months on your out of state tabs? Odds are, you will get a ticket.

I would say, that since you don't live in TN any more, your TN permit is no good, even though it doesn't expire until 2012. You could call them and ask, though. A phone call is a lot cheaper than a lawyer!
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Old January 14, 2011, 09:52 PM   #3
Brian Pfleuger
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^^^^

This is generally true, but there are states that simply change your permit from "Resident" to "Non-Resident". If Tennessee issues non-resident permits, there's a fair chance your permit is still valid. The only way to know is to call the issuing authority.
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Old January 15, 2011, 12:35 PM   #4
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 44AMP
Not a lawyer, so my advice is worth what you pay for it, but generally, if you mover out of the jurisdiction (state) where the permit is issued, it becomes invalid. New York state ivalidated my pistol permit as soon as they learned I have moved out of state.
No, this is NOT "generally" true. It is true for those jurisdictions for which it is true, and it is untrue for those jurisdictions where it is untrue.

My home state permit is good for five years from date of issue. If I move out of state, all I have to do is send a letter to the State Police (the issuing agency in my state) notifying them that I have moved, and they convert it to a non-resident permit with my new address in the database.

I do agree that the only way to know is to call the issuing authority.
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Old January 15, 2011, 07:29 PM   #5
Frank Ettin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aguila Blanca
...If I move out of state, all I have to do is send a letter to the State Police (the issuing agency in my state) notifying them that I have moved,...
And that points to a possible issue for the OP. Would he have had to notify the Tennessee authorities of a change of address? If so, and he failed to do so, that might invalidate his permit.

And, according to Handgunlaw.us, it looks like Tennessee will issue a permit to a non-resident only under very limited circumstances.
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Old January 15, 2011, 09:51 PM   #6
SwampYankee
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While the law may prescribe one thing, the guys enforcing the law (aka: cops) are usually woefully uninformed as to what the law does actually state. Cops seem substantially more informed about motor vehicle regulations than CCW regulations- at least in the Northeast. If I moved out of RI, I have no doubt that as long as the expiration date on my permit is still valid, no cop is going to hassle me over it the discrepancy between my drivers license and CCW. YMMV.
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Old January 16, 2011, 09:45 AM   #7
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddletown
And that points to a possible issue for the OP. Would he have had to notify the Tennessee authorities of a change of address? If so, and he failed to do so, that might invalidate his permit.
If Tennessee converts resident permits to non-resident, I would assume that notification would be a requirement. (However, standard caveats regarding assumptions apply.) Since it appears that the OP didn't notify Tennessee when he moved, that may create another problem if Tennessee would convert the permit: there may be a time limit for reporting the change of address. I'm quite certain my state has a limit, but since I'm not going anywhere soon I haven't paid any attention to what it is. If it's like the driver's license, I suspect it's measured in hours or days rather than in weeks or months.
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Old January 16, 2011, 11:31 AM   #8
Al Norris
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The latest filing in Peterson v. LaCabe, makes reference to this.

Under CO law, a CCW permit from Georgia is recognized. If the Georgia CCW holder moves to, say Florida, Georgia law does not invalidate that permit. However under CO law, the permit has just become invalid because the holder is no longer a Georgia resident (non-resident permits are not recognized under CO law).

So it appears that you have to look at not just the State in which your permit was issued, but also any States that you might pass through.
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