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Old December 30, 2010, 07:51 PM   #51
jhenry
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In the Charles Portis novel Cogburn shoots the right two times without aiming using Mattie Ross's Dragoon revolver. In the 1969 John Wayne version Cogburn uses his own SAA to shoot the rat. In the Bridges version there ain't no rat shooting at all. And no cat named General Sterling Price either.

You can't serve papers on a rat Baby Sister, you gotta shoot him or let him be.
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Old December 30, 2010, 10:40 PM   #52
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I came in a minute or two late but I thought they were in Fort Smith Arkansas, not Santa Fe. As a personal aside, after many years of getting thrown and other indignities, shooting a horse makes infinite sense to me.
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Old December 30, 2010, 10:40 PM   #53
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This site shows most of the guns in the original movie. http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/True_Grit

In the new movie Lucky Ned carries a Remington 1875 and Mattie's gun is a Colt Dragoon and not a Walker as in the first movie.
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Old December 31, 2010, 02:32 AM   #54
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Mattie's gun is a Colt Dragoon and not a Walker as in the first movie.
In the original it was supposed to be a Dragoon but the prop people messed up.
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Old January 12, 2011, 05:09 PM   #55
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Guns not so gritty

Howdy all! Just registered and here's my first post. Regarding the Coens' True Grit, whatever one's view of its overall quality versus the 1969 original, there's one area that the remake fell flat. For all the attention to detail, the guns in the film look new out of the box! For instance, Tom Chaney's Henry rifle has brass shiny enough to shave with. Same for Rooster's '51 navies in his saddle holsters and Mattie's "old" Dragoon. Also the wood stocks on all the rifles are heavily shellacked and glossy. Look closely at the original and you'll see all the weapons look properly aged. Goes to show that the old-timers got at least a couple of things right.
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Old January 12, 2011, 06:49 PM   #56
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Welcome to the forum.
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Old January 12, 2011, 07:37 PM   #57
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there's one area that the remake fell flat. For all the attention to detail, the guns in the film look new out of the box!
I hate to spill the beans, but in the time setting of the movie, those guns were practically new out of the box!

Welcome to the forum.

Last edited by Model-P; January 12, 2011 at 07:42 PM.
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Old January 15, 2011, 02:29 PM   #58
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True, Model P. But as the man said, "It's not the years, it's the mileage." My beef is that men who look like they haven't bathed since last Xmas and wouldn't know what a toothbrush is used for are toting around tenderfoot-shiny guns. Go to a cowboy shoot and look at the guns there, keeping in mind these guns belong to folks who don't live outdoors for weeks and months at a time. I could see Laboeuf with shiny guns, he almost seems prissy at times, but Rooster, Chaney and Ned Pepper? Not likely.
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Old January 15, 2011, 02:30 PM   #59
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P.S.

By the way, thanks for the welcome. I love this forum!
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Old January 15, 2011, 08:55 PM   #60
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"It's not the years, it's the mileage." My beef is that men who look like they haven't bathed since last Xmas and wouldn't know what a toothbrush is used for are toting around tenderfoot-shiny guns
Revolvers were seldom used and less seldom worn. Rifles were normally carried in a rifle boot so what mileage?
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Old January 15, 2011, 09:30 PM   #61
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Even if they look new at least they were period correct. You can't really say that for the original, or most westerns of that era for that matter. They didn't really start paying attention to that until later on. I would suggest that Clint Eastwood was one of the first directors to do so.
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Old January 15, 2011, 09:38 PM   #62
Hawg Haggen
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they were period correct. You can't really say that for the original, or most westerns of that era for that matter. They didn't really start paying attention to that until later on
Another thing you have to keep in mind is earlier westerns used original guns, some of which were already in short supply or like the Henry fired cartridges no longer made. 92 Winchesters were abundant and cheap.
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Old January 16, 2011, 12:34 AM   #63
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Another thing you have to keep in mind is earlier westerns used original guns,....
That's right, and many of those old, original guns had not only endured the real frontier, they had also endured years and decades of being thrown in the dirt, dragged through the mud, and bounced on boulders through take after take after take of numerous westerns. Those who think that's how the guns looked back in their own beginnings should maybe reconsider. I think the reason we have mental images of guns in the Old West looking like that is due largely, in part, to having watched all those old western films featuring all those worn out and abused antiques.
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Old January 16, 2011, 01:34 AM   #64
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I can't help but think that a former soldier, Union or Confederate, having been through the routine of cleaning his weapon every night would let his sidearm or rifle get too terribly beat up.
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Old January 16, 2011, 02:00 AM   #65
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I have always heard from my father whom had heard from his father...ect:, ect;

Horse and saddlery, first
then, your firearms, second
then, your boots, third
then, you feed your self, last
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Old January 16, 2011, 07:42 AM   #66
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Your granddad and dad got that right Egor20.
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Old January 16, 2011, 05:16 PM   #67
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You're right, but. . .

Good points, everyone! However, like Grant, "I'll fight it out on this line if it takes all summer." I do see the logic of "care for your horse, saddle, gun self" and the point about older western being made with original, well worn guns is quite insightful.
Perhaps it's a question of aesthetics; super shiny brass, to me, seems quite out of place on Civil War-era guns in a film set almost twenty years later. I have brass doorknobs that turn dull yellow just a few weeks after cleaning. Any vets who've had to polish brass belt buckles and rank insignia can attest to how quickly brass fixtures, especially ones that are handled frequently (like revolver grip frames and rifle receivers), tarnish up. If this weren't true Brasso would be long out of business.
So Hollywood, listen up! Before you turn out another western, send your guns to me for free weathering, tarnishing and break in. After all, I just want to do my part
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Old January 17, 2011, 01:53 AM   #68
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I see now. Yep, and brass tarnishes surprisingly fast when exposed to black powder fouling. I'd have to watch the movie again to see the brass of which you speak.
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