The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Semi-automatic Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 9, 2015, 02:33 AM   #1
Hunter0924
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 468
A little Colt history and detail strip, using it's parts as tools.

John Travis (1911Tuner) and I put this together.
It is not so much as a how to (that video is coming) but it can be done. He wanted to show the genius of the design all the way down to the receiver.

Thoughts and opinions please.
http://rangehot.com/no-tool-detail-strip-1911/
__________________
My firearms review site. http://rangehot.com/
Hunter0924 is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 04:58 AM   #2
peggysue
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2014
Posts: 751
I have several 1911's however have never had the need to detail strip nor build one. Looks OK.
peggysue is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 05:15 AM   #3
bloodysam
Junior Member
 
Join Date: November 17, 2011
Posts: 13
The 1911 was purposely easy to strip without tools because it was primarily designed to be a military pistol.

This feature was an advantage to the troops who were far from the logistics tail, gunsmiths...and tools.

Nice video to remind us of one of the best qualities of this pistol.
bloodysam is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 12:01 PM   #4
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 13,396
Obviously, that works. I prefer the slightly different method I was taught by the USAOC&S back in 75. It requires a (one) "tool".

The tool is a pin, punch, pencil, rifle bullet, toothpick, twig, etc., essentially anything that can be used to push in the firing pin.

He begins his strip of the frame by removing the safety lock (thumb safety), clearly, this is easy to do on his gun. I have met guns where it was NOT easy, or even possible by hand, until after you remove the main spring housing pin.

SO, the method I use is to use something to push down the firing pin, so it can be removed, then use the firing pin as the pin punch to remove the mainspring housing pin, THEN remove the thumb safety, and continue to strip the piece.

I also note that in the video, he called the frame "stripped" with the grips still on it. I don't count that as fully stripped. The grips are also removed, using the sear spring as the screwdriver.

I don't know of any more modern "improved" gun designs that let you do this. Can you do it with a GLock? a SIG? anything else?

I don't have a Glock, have a SIG, and while field stripping the SIG is a snap, after taking one look at the insides of the frame, well, this old boy "ain't goin' there" save in direst need.

In the century plus of use, to date, no one has come up with a handgun that does all the things the 1911 design does in one blended package. There are many designs that do some things better than the 1911 does, there are many that do things the 1911 doesn't do. Even with decades and decades of being able to study the 1911 design, no one has been able to produce something that is significantly better in ALL ways.

IF that isn't genius of design, explain to me what is, please...
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 12:53 PM   #5
RickB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2000
Location: Western WA
Posts: 6,218
Early M1911 grip screws had a dished notch, so the rim of a cartridge case could fit down into the slot to turn the screws.
I don't know if/when that was abandoned, probably as production ramped-up during WWI.
RickB is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 01:08 PM   #6
gc70
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 24, 2005
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,539
An M16/AR16 firing pin makes a great 1911 tool; the steps in the firing pin fit the different pin holes on a 1911.

On early 1911s, the lip on the base of the magazine fit the grip screws.

Thanks for the tips, 1911Tuner.
gc70 is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 02:08 PM   #7
RickB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2000
Location: Western WA
Posts: 6,218
And you can use the toe of the mag as a poor-man's bushing wrench, too.
RickB is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 02:12 PM   #8
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 21,594
The grip screws can also be removed using the sidewall of the magazine as a tool, and the grip safety arm of the sear spring can be used to remove the magazine catch. The actual tool, as issued, had only a pin punch and a screwdriver, all that was needed for field maintenance.

The only parts that should not be removed by the user are the front sight, the rear sight, the spring tunnel, the grip screw bushings, and the ejector. The mainspring housing should not be disassembled in any normal stripping, but it can be and might be in an extreme case, such as the gun having been soaked in salt water.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 05:19 PM   #9
polyphemus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 24, 2012
Posts: 738
Quote:
the spring tunnel,
Otherwise known aslunger tube to those of us who can't tell a spherically
blunted ogive from our elbow.
polyphemus is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 05:24 PM   #10
KyJim
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2005
Location: The Bluegrass
Posts: 8,034
Fun video to watch. I always pay attention to what 1911Tuner says.
__________________
Jim's Rules of Carry: 1. Any gun is better than no gun. 2. A gun that is reliable is better than a gun that is not. 3. A hole in the right place is better than a hole in the wrong place. 4. A bigger hole is a better hole.

no guns = might makes right
KyJim is offline  
Old January 9, 2015, 09:26 PM   #11
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 21,594
Yep, the correct name is plunger tube. But not lunger tube.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old January 10, 2015, 02:13 AM   #12
Hunter0924
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 468
John Travis (aka 1911Tuner) knows his stuff for sure. I do enjoy working with him.
I am pretty sure, since the stocks are not a serviceable part that impact function, I do believe the 1911 can be considered field stripped with the stocks and plunger in place.
__________________
My firearms review site. http://rangehot.com/
Hunter0924 is offline  
Old January 10, 2015, 09:11 AM   #13
g.willikers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 28, 2008
Posts: 6,592
The more ya' investigate a 1911, the neater they become.
Thanks for the video, it surely would come in handy if I ever lost my tool box.
But disassembling one down to its bits like that is doing it the hard way.
I just throw mine against a wall.
__________________
Lock the doors, they're coming in the windows.
g.willikers is offline  
Old January 10, 2015, 11:41 AM   #14
polyphemus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 24, 2012
Posts: 738
Quote:
I just throw mine against a wall.
All's I have to do is threaten to do that.
polyphemus is offline  
Old January 10, 2015, 12:20 PM   #15
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 21,594
FWIW, "field stripping" a gun means taking it down only as much as needed for proper cleaning. With the 1911, that means removing the slide and barrel, but not any frame parts. "Detail stripping" means taking a gun down to the smallest parts that are not a permanent assembly. Beyond that, like removing the front sight or the plunger tube on a 1911 would be done only by a gunsmith or qualified armorer; in the military service, it might be considered a depot level job.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old January 10, 2015, 01:44 PM   #16
polyphemus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 24, 2012
Posts: 738
OP,two detent plungers and one blocking plunger in series 80 pistols.
Which one is it you referring to?
Much to be learned from that Tuner.
(by the way John Browning called those,pistons)
polyphemus is offline  
Old January 11, 2015, 12:39 AM   #17
Hunter0924
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 468
The 2 detent plungers for the slide stop and thumb safety.
__________________
My firearms review site. http://rangehot.com/
Hunter0924 is offline  
Old January 11, 2015, 03:11 AM   #18
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 13,396
Quote:
Beyond that, like removing the front sight or the plunger tube on a 1911 would be done only by a gunsmith or qualified armorer; in the military service, it might be considered a depot level job.
No, its not. The only depot level item for the 1911 is the frame itself. Front sight, plunger tube, grip screw bushings and even the ejector was done at Direct Support level. I was one of the guys who did it in the 70s. D company709th DS BN 9th Infantry and Forward Support Company 498th Spt BN 2nd Armored.

We had the fixtures and special tools to install and stake the sights, bushings and tube, and we could replace/repair all the other parts except for the frame. And if the frame needed repair, it went to Depot level maint. As far as I know, Depot never repaired any frames they just DX'd the gun. (wrote it off in exchange for another).
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old January 11, 2015, 03:28 AM   #19
mete
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 14, 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 5,638
Taking apart a military gun I think is very important .Just like the French did with their M1873 !!
__________________
And Watson , bring your revolver !
mete is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2015 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.11176 seconds with 9 queries