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Old November 9, 2010, 07:50 AM   #1
crtlndbb
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Reloading my new AR-15

Hey guys im new here. I have reloaded for a couple of years now and have been reading a lot of helpful information on this forum. My question is when im reloading for my new AR do I need to crimp the bullet when I am seating. I know I am probably repeating this question and I am sorry. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank You

Last edited by crtlndbb; November 9, 2010 at 01:09 PM.
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Old November 9, 2010, 07:55 AM   #2
fella5
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In my AR, I will use a Lee factory crimp after seating the bullet when I load my normal shooting plinking rounds or bullets with cannelure. If I reload for a single load because the loaded cartridge is longer than the max for the magazine then I just use neck tension to hold the bullet. .003-.005 of neck tension.
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Old November 9, 2010, 01:55 PM   #3
mehavey
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No crimp is required (or even particularly useful) with 223/AR loadouts. The recoil isn't there that would require it, and reasonable neck tension generally gives the most repeatable results anyway.
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Old November 9, 2010, 02:10 PM   #4
TATER
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With a “new” AR, I would give a good crimp.. Set back Is not caused by recoil,
It’s from feeding....... Backing out, is caused from recoil..
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Old November 9, 2010, 02:29 PM   #5
demigod
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Quote:
With a “new” AR, I would give a good crimp.. Set back Is not caused by recoil,
It’s from feeding....... Backing out, is caused from recoil..
I agree. I throw a light Factory crimp on all my AR reloads. When I put match ammo together, I skipped on the crimp. But for general purpose shooting ammo, I'm all for the factory crimp.
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Old November 9, 2010, 06:05 PM   #6
RKG
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My standard plinking round for M4 is: 55-grain Winchester bulk FMJ; 26.0 gr. Win 748; CCI SR primer; and mixed military brass. I have never crimped, and never had any issue with bullet moving (in either direction). Round cycles the gun without failure; has nearly zip recoil; and with either iron sights or 4x scope, is more accurate than my sighting precision (i.e., on the order 1-1.5 MOA at 100 and 200 yards).
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Old November 9, 2010, 06:19 PM   #7
TATER
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Yes, Notice I said, “With a new AR,” Find out if the rifle is prone to stoppages. If so, Why.... If the
Round is getting jammed upped while feeding into battery, the crimp stops set back/over pressure.
Hey, If the rifle runs slick, That’s your call.
Know why you do it, Know the rifle, Then make the call...
Ie. Know the rules and why, then you will know when you can break them.

I have a slick little Heavy barrel Tac-driver that I "No longer" crimp for.
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Old November 9, 2010, 07:19 PM   #8
jepp2
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Depends on your rifle. One way to check it to pull a few rounds after they have been chambered by the firing action. I have seen them be shortened by the nose of the bullet striking the feed ramp while being chambered. I have also seen them lengthen due to the bullet moving forward as the brass stops suddenly in the chamber. Sort of like an inertia bullet puller.
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Old November 9, 2010, 07:28 PM   #9
NWPilgrim
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I taper crimp all my .223 ammo wither it has a cannelure (usually 55 gr or 62 gr), or not (like the 75 gr OTM) just like my pistol ammo FMJ. Even a light crimp holds it pretty secure.

And yes, the issue is about the bullet tip jamming on the feed ramp. I have a box of new Winchester SP with such loose neck tension that almost every round had major setback and would jam, but were too dangerous to fire.

Also, I use a relatively bulky powder like Varget which is usually compressed are full so the bullet has little room to set back anyway.
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Old November 9, 2010, 08:34 PM   #10
bullspotter
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I crimp ALL my AR ammo. It says to in the manual i have. I know that theirs alot of shooters who dont and have never had a problem, but ive seen lots of jams in matches were the bullet was pushed back into the case, both with cheap factory ammo and non crimped reloads. Ive also found brass at the range with a bullet inside the case, no ding on the primer.
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Old November 9, 2010, 08:43 PM   #11
mehavey
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For all who advocate crimping as a matter-of-course: Be sure your brass is all trimmed to the same (near exact) OAL.
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Old November 9, 2010, 09:12 PM   #12
NWPilgrim
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I agree, without keeping cases the same length the crimping is all over the place. Not good, especially if you are FL resizing.

That's why I use the RCBS X-Die, to keep them all at the same trim length without having to measure every case over and over as they are reloaded.
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Old November 9, 2010, 10:22 PM   #13
steve4102
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Here read this. Note the section on neck tension.

http://www.exteriorballistics.com/re...sgunreload.cfm
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Old November 9, 2010, 10:44 PM   #14
Jim243
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Your call, I lightly crimp all rounds for my AR, even for my bolt 223, gives consistant burn time on each round and no worry of setback.

All commercial rounds are crimped no exceptions that I have seen.

Since no one knows how hot or light you load, they can not make the call for you. Only you can determine if you should or shouldn't.


Good shooting
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Old November 10, 2010, 07:45 AM   #15
crtlndbb
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Thanks Guys. I think i will be doing some shooting this weekend so I will keep an eye on the rounds as they are chambered. I think I am going to go ahead and crimp to start out with just to be safe. Yes I will be trimming my cases before I load. Again thanks guys for the information.
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Old November 10, 2010, 08:59 AM   #16
demigod
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Quote:
For all who advocate crimping as a matter-of-course: Be sure your brass is all trimmed to the same (near exact) OAL.
That's the beauty of the LEE FACTORY CRIMP DIE. Brass length is NOT critical... within reason of course.
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