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Old November 7, 2010, 08:45 PM   #1
WolfMacabre
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Bought a used S&W 686-3, but it doesn't have a safety... can I add one?

I bought it a couple months ago, it's a S&W .357 model 686-3 and it takes .357 mags and .38 specials.

I didn't notice until after I had bought it though that it doesn't have a safety. I looked up the manual for it and in the manual it seems there should be a safety right where the release for the wheel is (pardon if I completely mess up on terminology I am new to the gun world).

I was just wondering if there is a way that I can add a safety, or if maybe I'm just missing something and it really is there...

Thanks!
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Old November 7, 2010, 08:47 PM   #2
zoomie
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Did you buy new or used?

New Smiths have an internal lock. It's not really a safety like on a hunting rifle, shotgun, or a 1911. Revolvers don't have safeties like that. The Smith internal lock is intended to be used while the gun is stored.

Here's what the lock looks like on the outside.

http://www.gunblast.com/images/SW-25...n/MVC-004F.jpg

It takes a special key that came with the gun to lock or unlock it.
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Old November 7, 2010, 08:48 PM   #3
S&W Kinda Guy
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Is there a little hole with an arrow by it?
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Old November 7, 2010, 08:54 PM   #4
Tom Servo
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There isn't a need for a manual safety on a revolver. It's got an internal safety that blocks the firing pin and prevents the gun from discharging if dropped.

Furthermore, the long double-action pull is a safety itself. Anything else would be extraneous.
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:06 PM   #5
WolfMacabre
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I'm trying to get a picture on but I'm having trouble getting it from my phone to my computer. The only hole I see is on the the action (i probably have that wrong, the piece on the back that hits the pin to fire it) other than that no hole, the spot to lock it is not there. But as long as it's not pre-cocked it'll be safe to carry around in a holster correct?
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:11 PM   #6
Chris W
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Correct. An uncocked revolver is a very safe firearm--within the normal parameters of safe gunhandling. It sounds like it would be well worth your time to find a range near you that offers some introductory training to help acquaint you with your firearm and other firearm types and to help you on your way to becoming a proficient shooter.

The 686 is a wonderful revolver. With some help and a solid introduction to gun safety, it will provide you with a lifetime of shooting enjoyment.
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:13 PM   #7
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Your 686-3 was manufactured long before S&W put the dreadful internal locks on their revolvers. Be glad and proud it does not have one.
Your 686-3 has everything it needs and nothing it doesn't.
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:19 PM   #8
WolfMacabre
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Okay, so if I drop it, it could mis-fire?

And I've had it at a range a few times, but never anywhere with anyone to give instruction, is that something I should definitely look into doing? I mean I know how to shoot it and everything, will they be able to teach me to shoot it good, and adjust the sights?

Oh and I got the pics too
Attached Images
File Type: jpg sw1.jpg (235.7 KB, 186 views)
File Type: jpg sw3.jpg (234.2 KB, 120 views)
File Type: jpg sw4.jpg (211.2 KB, 105 views)
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:46 PM   #9
bluetopper
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No, if you drop it it will not go off.

You have one of the finest revolvers ever made. There's nothing at all wrong with it. Relax and enjoy it.
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:58 PM   #10
WolfMacabre
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I do feel better about carrying it now that I've asked lol. More questions to come!
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Old November 7, 2010, 09:58 PM   #11
MrBorland
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Okay, so if I drop it, it could mis-fire?
No.

The hammer "rebounds" from it's bottom position and is held there by the rebound slide. You can see this for yourself: with the gun unloaded, cock the hammer, and keep your thumb on it. Then pull the trigger and keep it pulled while lowering the hammer. Once lowered all the way, slowly release the trigger, and you'll see the hammer "rebound". With your finger off the trigger now, simply try to push the hammer forward, and you'll see that you can't.

Quote:
And I've had it at a range a few times, but never anywhere with anyone to give instruction, is that something I should definitely look into doing?
Never a bad idea. Some good instruction can go a long way.

BTW, welcome to TFL. I'm a LV native myself (born & raised), but lived in the south for 20+ years. Seems it's gotten real crowded there since
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Old November 7, 2010, 10:10 PM   #12
orionengnr
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The first training class I took over 25 years ago had, as the lead instructor, the armorer from a large west coast city PD. He included some examples of handgun safety, including an S&W revolver which had been dropped by an officer while in a helicopter from about 500 feet. Fortunately, this was broad daylight in the city and there were units on the ground, so it didn't take long to find it, and it did not fall into evil hands.

After that drop, it did not discharge. That (and a few more of his examples) told me all I needed to know about modern firearms.

Bottom line--S&W revolvers have been perfectly safe for well over 100 years, as long as the operator keeps his finger off the trigger until discharge is desired.
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Old November 7, 2010, 10:20 PM   #13
jglsprings
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is that something I should definitely look into doing?
Yes you do need training. You need to understand how your weapon works, what to do to maintain it and how to handle it safely and properly.

I can only go from your posts here but it is clear from them that you need training. - No offense, I think you are dangerous at this point.

P.S.

If you can't find anyone that does firearms training professionally maybe one of your friends or someone at the shooting range can help you out.

http://maps.google.com/maps?near=997...es&hnear=&z=10
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Old November 8, 2010, 09:13 AM   #14
Kreyzhorse
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Congrats. That 686 is a great gun.

I'd certainly look for some instruction as you seem a little new to handguns.
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Old November 8, 2010, 11:17 AM   #15
Couzin
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I can only go from your posts here but it is clear from them that you need training. - No offense, I think you are dangerous at this point.
Strongly agree - also, no offense. Everybody starts somewhere - but at this point in your learning curve, you need some basic handgun skills and understanding.
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Old November 8, 2010, 11:26 AM   #16
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BTW - that "internal lock" (your word "safety") is a strong debate topic. Some folks really hate them (I do) - but if there are children (or other irresponsible adults) around, then the lock will slow a potentially dangerous situation. There have been reported instances of the lock engaging during live fire exercises. Your dash three model doesn't have the lock - but my 360PD and my 686-6 do - and I have never had the lock engage.
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Old November 8, 2010, 11:35 AM   #17
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I agree with the others above that say training is needed.

Not only will it help you understand your firearm better it will defiantly make you a safer gun owner.
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Old November 8, 2010, 11:45 AM   #18
RKG
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There is another demonstration that you might find meaningful, but frankly if you are this new to Smith & Wessons, some instruction is probably a wise idea.

You will need three things: a S&W double action revolver, and old fashioned wood-clad pencil with an eraser that hasn't been too worn down, and a spoon.

Take an UNLOADED S&W double action revolver.

Point the revolver toward the ceiling, cock it, and drop the pencil down the bore (eraser end down).

Pull the trigger and you should see the pencil move (indeed, it may fly out of the barrel, depending on how new the eraser end is).

Remove the pencil (if necessary), cock the revolver again, and drop the pencil down the bore again.

Using the spoon, tap on the trigger a few times until the hammer drops. What you are doing is simulating a sear failure, a jar-off, a false cock, or a twig off. The pencil won't move.

If you are a skeptic, you can repeat these tests, except cock the revolver with the cylinder open (you'll have to pull the thumb-latch back to cock an open S&W) and put a finger over the firing pin hole. Pull the trigger, and the pin will hit your finger. (Caution: it will smart.) Now cock it again, put your finger over the hole again, and tap the trigger with the spoon again. The hammer will drop, you'll probably flinch, but you won't feel the firing pin.

In order to discharge a S&W DA revolver with properly assembled and functioning parts, one must pull and hold the trigger back for the entire time of hammer fall.
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Old November 8, 2010, 12:18 PM   #19
Tuzo
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Check your 686

Try the revolver checkout technique at: http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=57816

This is a must for every potential revolver purchase. A S&W cylinder will not rotationally lockup as tight as a Ruger or Colt cylinder. A very small degree of play is normal for S&W. By the way, you have one of the finest firearms available at a reasonable cost.
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Old November 8, 2010, 12:20 PM   #20
Tuzo
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Check your 686

Try the revolver checkout technique at: http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=57816

This is a must for every potential revolver purchase. It has saved me from purchasing pretty but poorly functioning revolvers. A S&W cylinder will not rotationally lockup as tight as a Ruger or Colt cylinder. A very small degree of play is normal for S&W.

By the way, you have one of the finest firearms available at a reasonable cost.
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Old November 8, 2010, 12:22 PM   #21
KevininPa
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Whereabouts in the valley?

If I weren't working 6 days/ 10 hours, I'd shoot with you. I'm in Point Phillips (north of Bath). They're talking about going to 7 days soon. I'm already a walking zombie. Too old for these hours. I have the 4 inch version of your revolver. Where did you get yours and how much did they charge you if you don't mind my asking?


And yes MrBorland, it has gotten quite crowded here. If I can afford it, I'm moving out when I retire.
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