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Old October 26, 2010, 11:05 PM   #1
steeps09
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Probably going to start a war....

Alright, I just started reloading 155gr LRN over bullseye powder for my 4th Gen Glock 22 with a Lone Wolf Stainless barrel. So, I want to know all your guys' thought on shooting reloads through a Glock. I've read good and bad things and just want to see more thoughts. The big question that's probably going to start the war is, "Do I really need a stainless barrel to shoot lead rounds or not". Last thing, what do all you guys think about reloading 40 S&W.

F.Y.I I've loaded 300 rds with no issues and these were my first...ever!
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Old October 26, 2010, 11:14 PM   #2
m&p45acp10+1
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As far as aftermarket barrels in Glocks for shooting reloads. I shoot plated out of my stock G26. If I were shooting lead I would put on an aftermarket barrel. It is said that polygonal rifleing of the Glock barrels can casue excesive pressure if lead is fired from them, and allowed to build up.
On a another note as far as reloads in a Glock. A lot of shoot our own reloads out of Glocks. I would recomend to watch what you are doing closely. Make sure you are not seating too deep, and that your charge is within limits not exceeding published maximums. Also remember to start with the starting load, and work your way up.
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Old October 26, 2010, 11:20 PM   #3
dawico
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Shoot all the reloads that you want through your Glocks. You can shoot lead, but why? You must clean it frequently to prevent excessive pressure, but it can be done. I hate cleaning leaded barrels anyway, so I don't shoot lead bullets through any of my guns. Plated bullets have never leaded my barrels and make easier clean up worth a little added expense. I reload for the 40 S&W, as well as many other calibers. It doesn't seem to need any special attention, just the basic reloading safety concerns.
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Old October 26, 2010, 11:49 PM   #4
Red_Eagle
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The main reason to use an after market barrel is to save your brass. Glocks have very sloppy chambers, and, generally speaking devastate cartridge cases. 10mm comes out barrel shaped, 45 auto pretty much is destroyed (creased and bulged at the unsupported area. So far the only the only cartridge I've found that does well in a Glock factory chamber is 9mm Luger.
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Old October 26, 2010, 11:50 PM   #5
BDS-THR
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I shoot lead reloads out of my Glocks using Lone Wolf barrels and I love it.

+1 to Red_Eagle. I use mid-high range load data and don't need to worry about getting "bulged Glocked" cases. No bulge means easier resizing of cases. And yes, brass will last longer when it is worked less.

They keep my Glock barrels clean for SD/HD duties when I drop them back in the Glock slides after my range sessions. I don't have to worry about cleaning the barrels right away. With the right loads, you will minimize leading in your LW barrels.

Best part? I can reload lead 40S&W rounds for less than $5.00/50.
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Old October 26, 2010, 11:57 PM   #6
AlaskaMike
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Quote:
Shoot all the reloads that you want through your Glocks. You can shoot lead, but why? You must clean it frequently to prevent excessive pressure, but it can be done. I hate cleaning leaded barrels anyway, so I don't shoot lead bullets through any of my guns. Plated bullets have never leaded my barrels and make easier clean up worth a little added expense. I reload for the 40 S&W, as well as many other calibers. It doesn't seem to need any special attention, just the basic reloading safety concerns.
I find this interesting--do you get leading in all your guns when you shoot lead bullets through them?

I don't have a single firearm that I've experienced any significant leading in. I don't shoot soft, swaged lead bullets though--I use either commercially cast bullets, or those I cast myself from wheel weight alloy. There are a couple of revolvers I have which have *only* seen cast bullets fired through them--not a single plated or jacketed bullet. When cleaning, I certainly don't have to worry about anything more than running a couple of wet and dry patches through the barrel. Obviously there's more to cleaning than that, but as far as the barrel's concerned (where there's the possibility of leading) that's all I do.

With regard to Glocks, I don't see what the big deal is. Does the factory barrel have the potential for leading problems? Sure. Does that mean it will always lead? Of course not--there are plenty of people who shoot cast bullets through Glocks with factory barrels who don't experience any problems. Of course there are also plenty of people on the other side of the fence who very clearly experience leading, even with cast bullets of the proper size. Is it probably a good idea to do some testing before you try to shoot a thousand rounds of cast bullet loads through it non-stop? Absolutely.

And the idea that shooting reloads through a Glock is somehow different than shooting reloads through another equally high quality firearm is just silly. The majority of manufacturers will warn you against it. Don't crowd SAAMI max pressures, make sure your brass is in good shape and you'll be perfectly fine. That's a plan that countless experienced handloaders have followed for many decades.
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Old October 27, 2010, 12:06 AM   #7
chris in va
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I don't know if it's due to the low pressures involved, but for the heck of it I shot a few of my cast reloads through my 21SF and to my shock the stock barrel had absolutely zero leading. Gradually I put a few more mags down the pipe, still nothing.

So now I just check the barrel every 100 rounds or so and blast away.

Compared to other polygonal barrels, the Glock version seems to just be a normally rifled design except they rounded the lands over, making for a very smooth, easy to clean design. One swipe of a bore brush gets it back to mirror shine.

Can't comment on something like the 9mm or 40 as they are much higher pressures.
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Old October 27, 2010, 07:32 AM   #8
Sevens
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This debate has been done many times by many participants.

From my own corner, I once put 100 straight rounds of cast lead through my Glock 29 with OEM barrel to find zero leading. The load was a 200 grain LTC made by D&J pushed by a moderate charge of Power Pistol. A midrange load, warmer than chump factory 10mm (like Hydra-Shock) but not scorching like something from Buffalo Bore. Similar to Winchester's Silvertip.

One part of the debate that sounds rational is that the lead bullets won't engage the polygonal rifling and will skip & skid down the bore.

Where I get curious is when I ask -- where is all that lead supposed to "build up" and cause problems? There's no nooks and crannies for lead to sit in inside a factory Glock barrel. It's so smooth, there's no valleys or deep rifling grooves to fill with lead.

Seems to at least appear me like any lead that might be shaved and deposited in the bore is simply going to fall out or easily blow out with each and every shot.

And my own testing showed no lead left in the bore after 100 rounds.
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Old October 27, 2010, 08:49 AM   #9
trublu
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I've shot perhaps 5000 rounds of lead reloads through my completely standard glock 34. I figure I'll just buy another one if anything bad happens...but so far it hasn't i just clean the gun when i get home from the range...i don't understand the so-called debate.
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Old October 27, 2010, 09:28 AM   #10
wncchester
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I have no Glock but many years of shooting cast in both handguns and rifles shows that the bugaboo of leading rises from using the wrong cast bullets. Use a sufficently hard alloy, apply a good lube (Alox), size them to match the bore and there won't be a leading issue.

A friend of mine shoots my cast .45ACP stuff in his Glock with zero problems.
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