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Old October 20, 2010, 10:36 PM   #1
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Colt Python Problem

Hi All

I have a problem with my Colt Python.

Let me start by giving a little history about the time I've owned it. I bought this revolver in April 2010 along with a box of .357 Wolf Ammunition. I never used this ammo until today, though, I had been using .38 Special Sellier & Bellot with no problems (about 350 rounds). Today I decided to use the Wolf Ammo (all 50 rounds), and a box of CCI .38 +P.

While cleaning the gun tonight I noticed that the bluing is comming off the cylinder in several places. The first I noticed was at the end of the cylinder where the cylinder meets the forcing cone. This I think I can understand because of the back pressure that is created before the bullet leaves the barrel.

The most concerning problem though is the side walls of the cylinder. The bluing has flaked off on most of the flutes, and has caused me to be concerned. To me, my gut feeling is that the side walls of the cylinder are not able to withstand the pressure.

Since I have never seen or heard of this before, your comments will be greatly appreciated

Here are some pics. Keep in mind that the cylinder was in excellent condition until I went to the range today.

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Old October 20, 2010, 11:11 PM   #2
Webleymkv
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Are you sure that's bluing coming off and not just carbon or lead fouling? You might try to clean it and see if the marks come off.
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Old October 20, 2010, 11:24 PM   #3
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Hi Webleymkv

I call myself Newby because I am quite new to this love of handguns. I took your advice on cleaning it and you are right, it is comming off with a lot of aggresive rubbing. What a load off my mind.

Is there any products on the market that that will easily remove this residue so I don't wear the bluing off (powder solvent doesn't do much). It's comming off now but only when I use a lot of force.

Thanks
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Old October 20, 2010, 11:36 PM   #4
Webleymkv
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Lead-away cloths will remove the fouling in short order, but unfortunately they're not safe for bluing (stainless guns only). Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about the rings on the front of the cylinder, they're common and expected and they'll just come back every time you shoot the gun.

You might try using a different brand of ammo. Wolf .357 Magnum ammo is made by Prvi Partizan in Serbia. I've used Prvi Partizan in other calibers before and while it's decent enough ammo, it is rather dirty. In my experience, Federal or their generic brand American Eagle seems to be some of the cleaner burning ammo available. It won't prevent the fouling, but using other ammo might not make as much of it so that it won't be so hard to remove.

Since you said you've been shooting a lot of .38's, I'll alert you to another potential problem ahead of time. Because they're shorter than magnums, .38's tend to leave a ring of carbon in the cylinder that, if left uncleaned, can make extraction of .357 cases difficult. It's perfectly OK to shoot .38's in a .357 Magnum, but you need to make sure that you thoroughly clean the chambers afterward.
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Old October 20, 2010, 11:52 PM   #5
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Thanks Webleymkv

I wasn't too concerned with the marks on the ends of the cylinder, it was mostly the ones along side the flutes. And yes you are also correct about the extraction of the .357s I found that out today as well

Thanks again
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Old October 21, 2010, 08:07 PM   #6
threecharley
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Get a can of [gun scrubber] it works good on grease oil and lead deposits, or the lead away patches for just the lead on the cylinder face. colt mfg will do a royal blue refinish on it depending on barrel length from 225.00 and i think they even re roll the engraved areas. just got mine back from them for a tuneup so i could say it was gem mint when selling, didn't really need it but its a piece of mind. i love pythons i'm going to do a show your pythons post and show off yours.
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Old October 22, 2010, 07:38 AM   #7
stevieboy
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From the photos you submitted it's pretty obvious that the discolorations you've identified are carbon stains and not loss of the underlying blueing. With a blued gun removing the carbon without taking off some of the blueing with it can be tricky.

Brownell's sells a lead removal cloth that is safe for blued guns, or at least it used to, I haven't checked their site recently. The product is manufactured by Pro-Shot Products, P.O. Box 763, Taylorsville, Il., 62568, ph. 217 824 9133. You might check it out. I find that it is reasonably effective in removing carbon stains. By "reasonably effective" I mean that, with a lot of rubbing, it will get about 90% of the stains off the cylinder face and will be close to 100% successful with surface stains on the rest of the gun.

Carbon buildup on the gun's surface is primarily a cosmetic issue and how much you remove is a matter of taste. Carbon buildup in the gun's chambers can affect the gun's functioning and I think it's important to remove that.

Here's the problem in a nutshell. .38 rounds are shorter than .357s. When they discharge they blow out carbon residue which tends to build up in the gun's chambers at the point where the shell casing ends. That can produce a ring of carbon which, eventually, will make it difficult to chamber .357 rounds in the gun. It will also increase pressure within the chambers and that can at least theoretically result in damage to the gun's structure with repeated discharges.

I've found the easiest way to remove carbon deposits in .357 chambers is by brushing the chambers with a brush that is of slightly larger diameter than the chambers. Here's what I do. First, I swab the chambers with a patch that is coated with a small quantity of J & B Bore paste, a carbon and lead removing product that you can buy from Brownell's. You'll notice that the patch comes out black, indicating that just the paste is removing a lot of carbon. Then, I use a chamber brush in .40 S & W to brush the chambers. You may not be able to pull the brush back and forth because of the tightness of the fit. No problem, just rotate the brush for a few seconds once it's in the chamber. After that, run some solvent soaked patches through the chambers 'til they come out clean.
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Old October 22, 2010, 08:55 PM   #8
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As above, what you're seeing is carbon and/or leading.

I don't recommend rubbing too much with anything because this will rub the bluing off.
DO NOT use any type of "lead-away" cloth as these will wipe the bluing right off almost instantly.

For a blued gun I recommend a good bore solvent like Hoppe's #9 and a brass "toothbrush". Apply some solvent to the areas and let soak for a while, then gently brush with the brass brush.
Soak more than you brush, but be prepared to spend some time since this can be difficult to remove.
The leading on the cylinder face will be much more difficult to get off, and you're better off to just remove any excess build up and leave the rest of it. This will limit the amount of bluing wear caused by attempting to get it all off.

If you have leading in the cylinder chambers, buy a bronze chamber brush from Brownell's.
These are special extra-stiff bristled brushes made specifically for cleaning chambers.

Buy a Lewis Lead Remover kit from Brownell's. This is used to clean leading out of the barrel, and has a special tool head used to clean leading and copper build up off the rear of the barrel in the forcing cone.

Best advice is to limit how much effort you put into removing the leading and carbon from the cylinder face and the flutes of the cylinder. The more you try to get every bit of it, the more you'll wear the bluing.

Chamber brushes:
These work much better than over-size bore brushes.
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1...HAMBER_BRUSHES

The Lewis Lead Remover kit.
Also good for removing copper fouling from the forcing cone. Note the video on the site showing it's use:
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/cid=3...s_Lead_Remover
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Old October 24, 2010, 09:54 AM   #9
gyvel
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Go to your local health food store and buy a bottle or two of "100% PURE NATURAL Wintergreen oil." (NOT the stuff you get at Walgreen's.)

It is one of the greatest penetrants around and will help clean off the carbon and lead deposits on the outside of your gun. Use it sparingly, as a little bit goes a long way. Take your grips off first, as it does affect some types of wood finishes.
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Old October 24, 2010, 11:53 AM   #10
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Thanks everyone for all your help

I took your advice and got my old shooter clean (eventhough it was a lengthy process). I think, though, that I will stick to jacketed bullets from now on since the Wolf ammo that caused this problem were all lead.

I love my Python, I love Colts, and I can't wait until I get my Colt SAA.

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