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Old October 14, 2010, 04:42 PM   #1
shurshot
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125 Magnums and S&W M-28...?

I was flipping through a copy of "HANDGUNS" 2007 last night, and there was an article written on Police Trade-in guns (by Mr. Arten, pg 94). Great piece with lots of constructive feedback / photos on several guns, including the Smith and Wesson model 28 .357 Highway Patrolman.

A great article from a knowlegable shooter, however in the piece he mentioned hearing that he had heard that "125 grain Magnum loads can be tough on the M28". This confused me, as I have owned several 28's, and just picked up another last week, and I have never heard, or experienced anything pertaining to 125's being tough on 28's. IMHO, "N" frames are very rugged.

The model 19's, 66's, etc., yes, I know they get worn out quick (quicker than larger frames anyhow) with a steady stream of Magnums, as the "K" frame was designed for carrying, not day in, day out range use with Magnum loads.

Have I been in the dark here? Has anyone else here heard anything about 125 Mags being rough on SW 28's? I always thought the "N" frames could take anything in .357 Mag all day long.

Last edited by shurshot; October 14, 2010 at 05:04 PM.
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Old October 14, 2010, 04:56 PM   #2
brian45auto
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i heard nothing on the subject i feed mine a steady diet of 110 and 125g bullets, wrapped up pretty tight.
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Old October 14, 2010, 05:32 PM   #3
Action_Can_Do
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Full power loads (like the 125 gr. 357 load) are hard on any gun they're fired through. Some can take it better than others, but it's hard on any gun. Most people don't fire full power loads that often though so it's not really that much of a concern.
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Old October 14, 2010, 05:55 PM   #4
pythagorean
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There is more flame cutting under the top strap, and once in awhile the violence of the load may cause a cylinder ejector pin (one of the two sticking out from inside the face of the cylinder under the ejector) to fall out and be lost during an ejection.
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Old October 14, 2010, 07:43 PM   #5
laytonj1
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Quote:
once in awhile the violence of the load may cause a cylinder ejector pin (one of the two sticking out from inside the face of the cylinder under the ejector) to fall out and be lost during an ejection.
LOL... were do you guys come up with some of this stuff....

Jim
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Old October 14, 2010, 08:03 PM   #6
stevieboy
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You guys ever look at a 28? The forcing cone on that gun is double the thickness (at least) of the forcing cone on the 19/66 and considerbly thicker than on the 686. Same can be said for the cylinders, which is why Smith now chambers some versions of its 627, the stainless successor to the 28, for 8 rounds. The 28 is, to be honest, a brute of a gun. It has more metal in its cylinder and barrel than a 29. If an N-frame Smith can handle .44 Magnums it certainly can handle .357s. I have no concerns about firing 125gr. Magnums from my 28, do so with regularity, and have never experienced the least problem.
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Old October 14, 2010, 08:24 PM   #7
brian45auto
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flame cutting is a non-issue, it's been proven long ago, that it will get to a certain point and stop.
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Old October 14, 2010, 08:28 PM   #8
Tom Servo
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As long as the loads in question aren't vastly out of spec, I don't see a physical problem.

That said, the guns were sighted in for 158gr loads, so some adjustment of sights may be necessary.
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Old October 14, 2010, 08:41 PM   #9
44 AMP
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The issue with the K frames was called flame cutting (and it does happen), but the flame cutting has proven to be a self limiting issue. Yes, the hot 125s will cut a small groove, but no more than that, as once the gas cuts the metal enough, it can't cut any more, and the amount cut does not weaken the frame in any significant way.

What was more worrying was the cracking of forcing cones. The forcing cone of the K frame guns is much smaller, and is also relieved (cut away) to fit in the frame. The model 28 forcing cone is bigger, thicker, and I believe basically impervious to the problems the hot 125s caused in some K frame guns.

I shoot 125gr at 1600+fps through mine (although not often that hot) and have no issues what so ever.
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Old October 14, 2010, 08:43 PM   #10
Slopemeno
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I had a friend that worked for a dept. that issued 125 grain .357's, and he qualified year after year with his M-28. That's one beefy gun. I should have bought it off of him when I had the chance.
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Old October 14, 2010, 09:20 PM   #11
kraigwy
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I carried and issue Model 28. Our department went to 125 Gn Winchester stuff. I wouldn't give up my 150 grn LSWCs, but in practice I shot a ton of the 125 issue stuff.

I was a range office, and while waiting for the shift officers to show up at the indoor range I went through a heck of a lot of the 125 grn stuff.

I still have that gun, (I was allowed to keep it when I retired), I can tell you the 125 grn magnum stuff will not hurt a Model 28,

Heck I don't think anything can hurt a Model 28.
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Old October 14, 2010, 09:24 PM   #12
orionengnr
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The 28 is, to be honest, a brute of a gun. It has more metal in its cylinder and barrel than a 29. If an N-frame Smith can handle .44 Magnums it certainly can handle .357s. I have no concerns about firing 125gr. Magnums from my 28, do so with regularity, and have never experienced the least problem.
^^^This. I have a well-used M66--no issues. I had a well-used 586, no issues (but I like the K-frame better, so I sold the 586). I have pretty well-used M27, no issues. I also have N-frames in .45 LC and .41 Mag. If that frame and cylinder can hold up to .41 Mag and .44 Mag, I have no doubt that your 28 or my 27 will hold up under any sane .357 loading forever and ever. Amen.
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Old October 14, 2010, 10:53 PM   #13
roaddog28
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Hi,

Like others have mentioned 125 gr full power rounds is not a issue with a N frame S&W. I have used the round in my 28-2 and it has not had a problem. Again, like others have said the N frame is a 44 magnum frame revolver. Shooting 357s is nothing for a N frame.

Have fun shooting your M28.
Howard
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Old October 16, 2010, 06:40 AM   #14
Webleymkv
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The only issues I'm aware of with the M28 have to do with lots of hard, fast DA shooting rather than the ammo. Because of its large, heavy cylinder, the N-Frame is a bit more prone to timing issues from lots of DA shooting than the smaller S&W's are. Timing, however, is fairly easily fixed by about any competent gunsmith and is much less an issue that a cracked forcing cone or stretched frame. The only other issue with the M28 is the length of its cylinder as it is not as long as a K or L Frame. While this does not decrease the strength of the gun, it does somewhat limit bullet selection (very long nosed bullets like the 173grn Keith often have to be loaded in .38 Special cases to fit in the cylinder).
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Old October 16, 2010, 07:53 PM   #15
Mesquito Whitey
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M-28


KraigWy:

I too carried one, still have it. I totally agree with your last statement. I don't think you can hurt them either.
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Old October 17, 2010, 06:22 PM   #16
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You would have to have one heck of a load, shot an awful lot to hurt the N-frame in .357 mag. That is the frame of the .44 mag.
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