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Old October 12, 2010, 03:49 AM   #1
GHILLIE MAN
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standard barrel Ruger 10/22 in bull barrel .920 stock?

Just wondering if my standard barrel 10/22 will fit in a stock meant for a bull barrel? I dont have the funds right now to buy a bull barrel, but want to replace the cheap feeling synthetic Ruger stock. I want the stock to be able to fit a bull barrel at a later time. On another forum i was told this would actually free float my standard barrel? Also would there been any issues that i would need to look out for? The stock im looking at is the Hogue Overmolded .920"

any info would be great.

Thanks.
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Old October 12, 2010, 09:13 AM   #2
zukiphile
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I did exactly that and the result was great. Accuracy was improved, but not great from the stock barrel. The POI walked around as the barrel heated.
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Old October 12, 2010, 10:10 AM   #3
GHILLIE MAN
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So you mean the stock was good? but not with the standard barrel in it? I dont think i would be firing it enough to get the barrel that hot.
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Old October 12, 2010, 10:16 AM   #4
zukiphile
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No.

A bull barrel stock worked well with the standard barrel.

If you fire the rifle more than two or three times you will have warmed the barrel sufficiently to get the POI to walk. -- At least if you are using any of my barrels.
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Old October 12, 2010, 10:29 AM   #5
GHILLIE MAN
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Is it only due to the thickness of the smaller standard barrel? Meaning i wont have a problem with this stock and a bull barrel? and how much change in POI are we talking at say 50 yards? a few mm? or a significant amount, say an inch?

also why did you say it worked well, if after only 3 shots your poi was changing?
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Old October 12, 2010, 10:41 AM   #6
zukiphile
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM
Is it only due to the thickness of the smaller standard barrel? Meaning i wont have a problem with this stock and a bull barrel?
I have found that heavy barrels walk much less. That is part of the reason I eventually bought another barrel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GM
...and how much change in POI are we talking at say 50 yards? a few mm? or a significant amount, say an inch?
With my barrel at 50 feet, the POI made a sort of odd figure-eight, very small at the top and large at the bottom, just a bit more than an inch tall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GM
also why did you say it worked well, if after only 3 shots your poi was changing?
Because it was more accurate than that barrel in a thin barrel stock. If you know how POI will shift you can compensate to some degree.

Look at it this way: You want to buy a new stock anyway. Why not try the thin barrel before spending the money for a new one.

If you don't want to spring for the new stock now, you could just sand out the barrel channel in your current stock.
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Old October 12, 2010, 11:02 AM   #7
essohbe
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My experience has been about the same as what Zukiphile said.
Putting a thin barrel in the .920 stock will essentially "free float" the barrel. This should have something to do with accuracy unless you're shooting way far (You should get an adjustable V-block to help support the barrel though, if you think it's too heavy or you're getting "droop").
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Old October 12, 2010, 11:17 AM   #8
Pahoo
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GHILLIE
The main point I am getting from your post, is that you want the feel and look of a fancier target stock. Then at some point in the future, you will get the .920 target barrel and there are many choices for that. Yes, you can drop your standard and yes, it will work and "really" float. Depending on your usage, it could present a problem. I put a front support or spacer in mine and still minimized any barrel stesses. I just did not like the look and idea of the barrel being so free and volnerable and possible damaging the reciever. Eventually I bought a used beat-up birch stock and painted it with Rhino-Hide.


Be Safe !!!
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Old October 12, 2010, 05:31 PM   #9
GHILLIE MAN
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You're on the money. I'm sick of this synthetic Ruger stock, and dont like the toyish pellet gun feel it has. I also want a little longer stock. So for the mean time i can only afford the Hogue stock and at a later date i'll switch out the barrel. My intended use is for bench and prone target shooting. I hope the free floated barrel will not hurt the receiver in any way. I wont be trekking through woods or fields, and the gun itself will not be moved around much. Do you think i need to be concerned about the receiver? Thanks.
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Old October 12, 2010, 08:42 PM   #10
essohbe
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Quote:
I hope the free floated barrel will not hurt the receiver in any way.
Then totally get the adjustable v-block. If you want to float your .920 barrel later, you'll definately need it then anyway (unless you get one of those $200+ lightweight carbon-fiber barrels).

Quote:
I put a front support or spacer in mine and still minimized any barrel stesses.
I did that too and it made the shots fly all over the place when the barrel heated up. GET THE ADJUSTABLE V-BLOCK! Lol.
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Old October 13, 2010, 12:28 AM   #11
GHILLIE MAN
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The adjustable v block seems to be a good idea, but then it may pose another issue. I would have to remove the barrel, which i dont have a gauge to measure the casing head space when re-attaching the barrel. A lot of people over look the importance of measuring headspace when reattaching a barrel to a receiver. It is especially important with center fire guns. Guess i'll just bring it to a gunsmith to have it put on.
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Old October 13, 2010, 08:58 AM   #12
zukiphile
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Quote:
The adjustable v block seems to be a good idea, but then it may pose another issue. I would have to remove the barrel, which i dont have a gauge to measure the casing head space when re-attaching the barrel. A lot of people over look the importance of measuring headspace when reattaching a barrel to a receiver. It is especially important with center fire guns.
I don't understand what you would accomplish by measuring the headspacing on a 10/22 barrel, or why it would be important in attaching a barrel to a 10/22 receiver. 22lr headspaces off the rim which rests on the barrel itself. The receiver just holds the bolt, spring and barrel in the same local area so they work together.
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Old October 13, 2010, 07:30 PM   #13
essohbe
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^ Yep. What he said. Just pull the barrel off and put another/same one on.

DO however, make sure you align the extractor and extractor recess right, otherwise you'll have a ruined extractor + tons of rounds that FTE.
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