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Old October 9, 2010, 02:26 PM   #1
vez
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Bounty Hunters

Is anyone familiar with the laws for bounty hunters? Are they allowed to take suspects down at gunpoint what are their legal authorities?
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Old October 9, 2010, 03:44 PM   #2
thallub
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In most states bail enforcement agents have a lot of leeway so long as they do not violate the rights of others. Used to know a bail enforcement agent in WV. He caught a bail jumper in FL, tied him up with duct tape and put him into the camper shell of his pickup.

On the way home the agent stopped at a seafood market in SC. There he filled the back of the truck with ice and shrimp. He put the perk on the top of the load and hauled him off to jail in WV. The perp was shivering two days after he got to jail.
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Old October 9, 2010, 04:40 PM   #3
swinokur
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IIRC in some jurisdictions bounty hunters may enter a dwelling without a search warrant. I know there is law for this but can't provide a cite. Seems like a 4th amendment violation to me. Maybe the Constitution specifies this. not sure

Bail agents have a lot of leeway as someone mentioned
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Old October 9, 2010, 06:52 PM   #4
Nnobby45
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They apparently have a lot of leeway. One entered a day care center in Nevada and a gun was drawn at some point, and the legislature responded with a real crime stopper bill that now prevents grandpa from escorting a toddler into the licensed day care center, so mom can sleep in, and then continue on to do a little hunting afterwards. Parking off property not an option.

Applies to CCW. The cowboy nature of some bounty hunters has been legendery and their character hasn't been much higher than those they seek-- while others use their powers responsibly and operate in a professional manner.

Last edited by Nnobby45; October 9, 2010 at 07:02 PM.
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Old October 9, 2010, 07:28 PM   #5
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swinokur
IIRC in some jurisdictions bounty hunters may enter a dwelling without a search warrant. I know there is law for this but can't provide a cite. Seems like a 4th amendment violation to me. Maybe the Constitution specifies this. not sure
The Constitution applies to the government. "Bounty hunters" do not represent the government, they represent bail bondsmen. If/when someone posts bond, they sign a contract with the bondsman. If they don't show in court, they are in violation of the terms of the contract. Somewhere in the fine print, they have granted to the bail bondsman the right to catch them, any time, any where.

It has nothing to do with Constitutional rights. It's purely contractual.
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Old October 9, 2010, 07:47 PM   #6
Raven Armament
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I was a bounty hunter for a few years.

Doing a search for bail enforcement laws via Google will bring up sites with legal information from various trade associations dealing with bail bond enforcement. It's vary state specific. Some states heavily regulate it or ban it, like Wisconsin, but others like Michigan don't regulate it and often encourage the practice (MI bounty hunters are entitled to bona fide law enforcement backup at their request, per state law).

This is one in my resource and is a pretty good site:

http://fugitiverecovery.com/laws/
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Old October 10, 2010, 03:37 PM   #7
EricReynolds
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I used to work as a "Field Investigator" for a bail bondsman, but a rose by any other name... Anyway, as Aguila hinted at, it's not so much that bounty hunters have leeway because of their authority, but rather their fugitive's have forfeited the rights a person would have who is simply under arrest. Even a person who has not yet been found guilty is in quite a pickle because they are back in custody due to breaking their contract. Also, Dog the Bounty Hunter is a joke. He became famous after entering Mexico (where bounty hunting is illegal) and making an apprehension. That's what we call kidnapping. Anyone who watches the show also knows that he doesn't carry a firearm. He says he doesn't need one, but the real reason is he's a convicted killer. In NY, he couldn't be a mall security guard. There was a better show on HBO called Family Bonds, where they did carry. My point with this diatribe is just to show how much it really does very from state to state.
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Old October 10, 2010, 04:28 PM   #8
Glenn Dee
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^5 Aguila

In the state of florida bounty hunting is not legal. A bail bondsman may take into custody an individual he has paper on. A licensed investigator may be hired by the bondsman to locate the wanted person, but only the bondsman may make the actual arrest. The Bondsman may bring licensed investigators (C license, and G license) as back-up. None of these people may open carry.
The investigators are allowed to CCW a .380, .38, or 9MM pistol or revolver.

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Old October 10, 2010, 04:31 PM   #9
Glenn Dee
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Recently a bondsman/investigator got himself into a lot of trouble while injecting himself into a major police investigation. He was subsiquently arrested for kidnapping. But he is a bit of a cowboy. I'm sorry Cowboys are good men. He is a bit agressive.


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Old October 12, 2010, 02:22 AM   #10
8shot357
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Quote:
vez


Is anyone familiar with the laws for bounty hunters? Are they allowed to take suspects down at gunpoint what are their legal authorities?

I'm just curious why you asked, are you interested in becoming a "Bounty Hunter", if so, tell me why, and I can give you plenty of info.
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Old October 12, 2010, 08:16 AM   #11
Rifleman1776
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In a legal sense a bail bondsman is the 'jail'. Attempts to escape can be handled with almost any means needed. Entering without a warrant, etc. It does vary by state. I was one in Arkansas.
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