The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Tactics and Training

View Poll Results: Would you sue someone who shot you no matter the circumstances or explanation?
Yes, I would sue no matter the circumstances or explanation. 36 28.35%
No, I would weigh the circumstances and explanation carefully. 91 71.65%
Voters: 127. You may not vote on this poll

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old July 25, 2010, 06:50 PM   #51
jgcoastie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 15, 2009
Location: Kodiak, Alaska
Posts: 2,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottRiqui
Hopefully you don't have any lasting debilitating injuries.
I hope I don't get shot...
If I do have a lasting debilitating injuries, it'll be okay. I can become a gunsmith and make a living that way!!

Quote:
Even if the shooter were Bill Gates, TRICARE isn't going to attempt to recover *anything* beyond your immediate treatment and enough aftercare to last until you're medically retired and collecting your pitiful monthly disability payments. After that, you're the VA's problem.
True enough. But at least I'll be alive...
__________________
"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them." -Richard Henry Lee, Virginia delegate to the Continental Congress, initiator of the Declaration of Independence, and member of the first Senate, which passed the Bill of Rights.
jgcoastie is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 10:15 PM   #52
usaign
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2010
Posts: 73
Thanks guys for replying to this thread and voting in the poll. I just wanted to see who would file a lawsuit no matter what happened. Some folks even responded in the thread with logic and wisdom to justify their stance of sueing no matter the explanation.

I think what it comes down to is the new attitude in America that "someone has to pay". Obviously, the bad guy getting shot probably doesnt have any money or homeowner's insurance so they cant really be sued. Well, they can, but its like trying to knock through a solid brick wall with your fists. So they go for the good guy who probably has a home or other insurance because he is the only one that can pay and it if it were not for his actions then they wouldnt have been shot in the first place.

I guess all this twisted logic leads me to believe in one thing. Dont get yourself in the situation in the first place if at all possible. Avoid getting into a shooting match with someone because in the end someone will probably sue and/or the prosecutor might get you too.

At the end of the day, $$$$ and who is going to pay the bill is all what some people think in America. They are not glad to be alive or happy that the bad guy was aprehended. They just want money for themselves or their family and everything else is second nature.
usaign is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 10:29 PM   #53
ScottRiqui
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2010
Location: Norfolk, VA
Posts: 2,905
You can call our logic "twisted", but frankly, I'm baffled at your idea that the shooter shouldn't be held responsible for the round he put downrange into my skinny ass. "Oops - my bad" may work on the basketball court, but I'm not going to take a huge financial hit and spend the rest of my life paying off my medical bills because good old "Cross-eyed Larry" couldn't keep his shots on target.

And you say we should be "glad to be alive". Pretty glib of you, considering that there's a very real chance that we might have escaped completely unscathed if not for the well-intentioned shooter's wayward shot.
ScottRiqui is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 10:46 PM   #54
Sphawley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 9, 2010
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 272
Depending on the circumstances I guess it would depend...

But its hard to say what you would do till you were in that situation
Sphawley is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 10:55 PM   #55
usaign
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2010
Posts: 73
All I am asking is if you would be willing to listen and consider the explanation and circumstance before filing a lawsuit or if you would just file anyway no matter what the circumstances are involved.

Ultimately, someone has insurance and your medical bills would be paid for. I think most of us here have medical insurance or can make claims under medicaid/medicare. The shooter probably will have homeowner's insurance to protect themselves. Most decent jobs have disability insurance. All businesses have some type of insurance. The hospital wants to get paid so they will assist the homeless man in filing out the state medicare/medicaid forms and they will be compensated. So someone is going to pay your bills...

I am just wondering if you would take it further then just medical bills and go out of your way to file a lawsuit for much more then just your bills. Im certain that most people filing a lawsuit are not just worried about their bills. Most lawsuits seek millions in cash rather then 10-20k for what they spent on you at the hospital.
usaign is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 11:00 PM   #56
ScottRiqui
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2010
Location: Norfolk, VA
Posts: 2,905
Quote:
I am just wondering if you would take it further then just medical bills and go out of your way to file a lawsuit for much more then just your bills. Im certain that most people filing a lawsuit are not just worried about their bills. Most lawsuits seek millions in cash rather then 10-20k for what they spent on you at the hospital.
First, you'd be damned lucky to get out of the hospital with only $20k in medical bills for anything other than a superficial flesh wound.

Second - you did a better job of posing your question in your last post than you have in the entire poll/thread. If it been clear from the start that you're talking about suing for an amount above and beyond my legitimate expenses, basically trying to take an opportunity for a lottery-like payday, then I would have voted differently.
ScottRiqui is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 11:17 PM   #57
usaign
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2010
Posts: 73
I cant imagine a circumstance where an insurance company would not pay for all of your reasonable medical bills. The point you are trying to assert is a rare case where the medical bills would not be paid for. Employed individuals usually have some type of health insurance and disability. My employer has many different options they offer to include long term disability. Then we have the state which provides various funding through medicare/medicaid. We also have various business and homeowner's insurance plans.

Lets take illegal aliens for example. Even illegal aliens would not be refused admission to the hospital and the bills might hit their credit reports if they had a social security #. Their bills too would eventually hit the state under various funding programs.

So you argue that you would file a suit because your bills wont get paid, but they probably will get paid. So what are you debating about? Are you unemployed and do not have any health insurance? Is that why you would file a suit?

Well, lets say you are unemployed with no health insurance and there is no other insurance then we turn to the state violent crime compensation fund.

http://www.google.com/#q=violent+cri...662d02f57091a4

Every state has one. So the point is moot. Your bills will be paid no matter the circumstance. So why file suit if all your bills will be eventually paid by some entity?

Last edited by usaign; July 25, 2010 at 11:23 PM.
usaign is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 11:47 PM   #58
ScottRiqui
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2010
Location: Norfolk, VA
Posts: 2,905
I don't think you have the first inkling as to how much a serious injury costs to treat. See my earlier example of my $140k hospital bill. That was for a 12-day stay and one operation, and except for some broken bones in my hand, all of the damage was limited to one leg. Internal injuries requiring a longer stay and/or multiple surgeries could easily make my bill look like chump change.

While it's true that the shooter might have insurance, look up what the liability limits are for many such policies. Not everyone is walking around with a multi-million dollar umbrella policy. And insurance companies are not exactly known for being "Johnny on the spot" when it comes to paying out claims, even for legitimate, documented medical expenses. In many cases, a lawsuit is going to be the only way to pry a payment from them. And while I do have insurance, they're going to go after the shooter and his insurance company first, and I'm going to have to be a party to that lawsuit, testify, etcetera.

As for the state victim's defense funds, look into how much they actually cover, *if* your claim is approved. To use Texas as an example, the cap is $50k, and they'll only pay out after every other resource has been exhausted (shooter's insurance, Medicare/Medicaid, Worker's Comp if applicable, etcetera.) You might qualify for an additional $75k to cover long-term expenses, but only in the case of permanent, total disability.

In short, you can say "the bills are going to get paid" all day long, but the reality is that it's not likely to happen without a lawsuit to help it along.
ScottRiqui is offline  
Old July 25, 2010, 11:49 PM   #59
scottaschultz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 27, 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 392
Well let's turn this around...

Suppose YOU were the one who shot an innocent bystander in the course of stopping a crime? Now the guy is laying there in a pool of his own blood hanging on by a thread. So what are you going do?

"I'm really sorry I shot you. You got insurance, right?"

Even if the guy has insurance, are you just going to walk away and let him shoulder the burden? If you have any sort of conscience, you are going to offer to pay his bills.

If I get shot by an otherwise well-meaning person and they do not at least offer to pay my medical bills, you bet your ass I'm going to sue him!
__________________
"I don't like repeat offenders, I like dead offenders!" Ted Nugent

Last edited by scottaschultz; July 26, 2010 at 12:01 AM.
scottaschultz is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 12:08 AM   #60
ScottRiqui
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2010
Location: Norfolk, VA
Posts: 2,905
Quote:
Well let's turn this around...

Suppose YOU were the one who shot an innocent bystander in the course of stopping a crime? Now the guy is laying there in a pool of his own blood hanging on to a thread. So what are you going do? Even if the guy has insurance, are you just going to walk away and let him shoulder the burden?

If I get shot by an otherwise well-meaning person and they do not at least offer to pay my medical bills, you bet your ass I'm going to sue him!
Likewise, if it's okay for all of the expenses above and beyond the shooter's insurance liability limits to be foisted off on the victim's insurance company, his employer, Medicare, Medicaid, state's victim's funds, etcetera, then what's the incentive for the shooter to carry realistic liability coverage? He could just say "Oops - you hit my $100k liability limit after your first week in the hospital and your first surgery? Sorry about that - good luck!"

The victim's insurance company isn't going to like that plan. The more realistic scenario is that after the shooter's liability cap is met, the victim's insurance company will go after the shooter's house and savings. It's sad, but that's personal responsibility.

And the whole "glad to be alive" thing still sticks in my craw. In fact, it's almost the textbook definition of chutzpah. Without painting a specific scenario, it's possible that the victim is still alive not because of the shooter's actions, but in spite of the shooter's actions. It's like telling the victim of a drunk driver "relax - you should just be glad to be alive!"
ScottRiqui is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 12:21 AM   #61
Frank Ettin
Staff
 
Join Date: November 23, 2005
Location: California - San Francisco
Posts: 6,714
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottRiqui
...If it been clear from the start that you're talking about suing for an amount above and beyond my legitimate expenses, basically trying to take an opportunity for a lottery-like payday, then I would have voted differently...
[1] And really, nobody get a "lottery-like payday" from a negligence suit. He'll only get what a jury decides are his legitimate damages.

[2] Those legitimate expenses, as described earlier, will may very well include substantial hard, economic damages beyond just medical costs.

[3] If you sue someone for negligence, you may be able to get compensated for the damages he caused you to suffer. You will not get rich, and you will not be rewarded beyond the losses the jury believes you have suffered.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usaign
All I am asking is if you would be willing to listen and consider the explanation and circumstance before filing a lawsuit or if you would just file anyway no matter what the circumstances are involved....
Personally, I would of course consider the circumstances. I would evaluate and weigh those factors I described in post 37. But I would not shrink from suing under the appropriate circumstances.

I do certainly believe that ordinary folks have a right to have guns and to defend themselves and their families. That's why I have guns. That's why I've trained with a number of the major instructors in the use of my gun, and that's why I practice regularly. Certainly it's been demonstrated repeatedly that a gun in the hands of a private citizen can effectively be used to prevent a violent criminal act.

But on the other hand, I'm sometimes shocked at the expressions of irresponsibility I've seen on various gun forums over the years. Some folks seem to think that training and practice are unimportant. Some folks complain bitterly about being expected in some States to demonstrate basic proficiency and knowledge of the law of the use of force as a condition of carrying a gun in public.

It would be nice if we could have confidence that all of those of our fellow citizens who go about in public armed for their protection were equally serous about comporting themselves in a manner consistent with an appropriately high standard of care. But it looks like that would be expecting too much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usaign
I cant imagine a circumstance where an insurance company would not pay for all of your reasonable medical bills. The point you are trying to assert is a rare case where the medical bills would not be paid for. Employed individuals usually have some type of health insurance and disability. My employer has many different options they offer to include long term disability. Then we have the state which provides various funding through medicare/medicaid. We also have various business and homeowner's insurance plans....
[1] Medical insurance doesn't pay 100% of all medical bill. There are co-payments and deductibles. There are limitations on some kinds of care, especial rehabilitation.

[2] Fewer and fewer employers in this economy are making coverages like long term or short term disability, or other types of income replacement, available. In fact these types of benefits have generally been provided by only larger employers. Small employers, which actually give jobs to a very high percentage of our work force, usually have not provided any meaningful income replacement insurance benefits.

[3] Governmental programs, like Medicaid, will require an applicant meet an indigency test. So if you have any assets, savings for your retirement, equity in a home, etc., you will have to shed them before you become eligible for government assistance.

[4] As mentioned earlier, some of the types of damages you might suffer might not be covered by any of your first party insurance coverages.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottRiqui
...In fact, it's almost the textbook definition of chutzpah. Without painting a specific scenario, it's possible that the victim is still alive not because of the shooter's actions, but in spite of the shooter's actions....
Well said.
Frank Ettin is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 01:09 AM   #62
Alaska444
Junior member
 
Join Date: April 3, 2010
Posts: 1,231
Quote:
Ultimately, someone has insurance and your medical bills would be paid for. I think most of us here have medical insurance or can make claims under medicaid/medicare. The shooter probably will have homeowner's insurance to protect themselves. Most decent jobs have disability insurance. All businesses have some type of insurance. The hospital wants to get paid so they will assist the homeless man in filing out the state medicare/medicaid forms and they will be compensated. So someone is going to pay your bills...
I am not sure folks are being realistic. The HMO that I worked for for over 11 years had an entire department collecting 3rd party liability payments through law suits. If the person that got shot doesn't sue you, their insurance group most likely will to recover their losses. This is not a new American mindset, people that have injured another are liable and this is a very old concept.
Alaska444 is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 02:20 AM   #63
usaign
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2010
Posts: 73
Scott,

Again, you are basing your argument purely on $$$. 1 in 4 Americans have a credit score under 600 so there 140k in bills will go nicely on their credit report alongside their foreclosure. I dont think most care about paying the bill nowadays.

A more powerful argument is about non-monetary costs such as permanent pain and injury. I have pain in my foot right now not from a gun shot, but just regular walking around all day. A gun shot to my leg would probably hurt until I die in some way shape or form not to mention put a permanent scar on my body that would be truly ugly.

Now lets say a man is about to shoot a 5 year old girl. I then double-tap some rounds into the man. Some of the bullets go through the man, go through the wall and hit John Smith in his foot. John now has a permanent injury to his leg where he limps and has pain.

So this thread is all about seeing who would study the situation and then decide on sueing and who would just automatically sue no matter the scenario. I didnt start this thread to talk about insurance, bills or whatever you are talking about. I just want to see how many people would think first then sue or how many people would just outright sue.

Personally, I would study the situation and carefully consider the scenario before immediately acting. I would not hire an attorney that day or the next day, but think first and then act. Thats what I would do.
usaign is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 08:03 AM   #64
jhenry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 27, 2006
Location: Ozarks
Posts: 1,813
usaign, that is a good example. BUT FOR the would be killer's actions, nothing would have happened. John shot in the foot was NOT shot 'but for' the actions of the shooter. It is interesting to me, and frankly not just a little bit disturbing, to see how many folks would look right past that little girl and right past the shooter's act which saved her life, to go find a lawyer so they could ride John to the bank and cash in. It is, sadly, a me generation mind set we are dealing with. Me first, and screw John.

It is also interesting to me how much chest beating goes on when someone posts a thread "what would you do in this situation" etc. The name calling and so forth that happens when one party may suggest being a good witness instead of direct action, depending upon the situation, has closed many a thread. Now look at this thread.

There have been some well reasoned arguments presented to support view points, and there have been some lesser responses. My own viewpoint is that if you would line up a lawyer without even giving a thought to examining the situation you have an internal problem you may want to take a good look at.
__________________
"A Liberal is someone who doesn't care what you do, as long as it's mandatory". - Charles Krauthammer
jhenry is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 08:17 AM   #65
Glenn E. Meyer
Staff
 
Join Date: November 17, 2000
Posts: 15,698
It's very easy to posit an idelogical position till you are there and faced with the real consequences of actions.

In a way, I've asked this before. Folks have demanded that someone intervene in an incident to save their family. The good samaritan should take that risk to him or herself and the consequences to their family if they get hurt or killed saving you.

But asked if you would support the good samaritan or his and her family for the rest of their lives - the silence is deafening. Even if you said you would on the Internet - that's worth spit.
__________________
NRA, TSRA, IDPA, NTI, Polite Soc.
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...05_Feature.htm
Being an Academic Shooter
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...11_Feature.htm
Being an Active Shooter
Glenn E. Meyer is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 08:20 AM   #66
scottaschultz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 27, 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 392
It has absolutely nothing to do with money. It has everything to do with morality and doing the right thing.

If one of my dogs gets out and bites you, I am going to insist you go to the ER or maybe one of those med-stop places and get checked out and then send me the bill. It was an accident, but it was my dog and you did nothing (I presume) to warrant getting bit. Therefore it is my responsibility to take care of it.

But let's say your dog bites me. You might be down on your lucky and unemployed with no insurance. There is always some sort of "circumstance" surrounding any situation that might prevent you from taking care of a situation your are responsible for. Obviously I can't sue you because my daddy always told me, "You can't do business with people that don't have any money". Well, I could sue you, but it probably wouldn't do me any good.

Its the same thing if you accidentally shoot me. The fact that you stopped a woman from being raped or a child being kidnapped still doesn't heal my wounds. If you can't pay, well then I guess I don't have much of a choice. But if you can pay, either from your personal funds or more likely through your insurance, then you will pay, either voluntarily or by the order of a judge. You pick!
__________________
"I don't like repeat offenders, I like dead offenders!" Ted Nugent
scottaschultz is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 08:32 AM   #67
shafter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2009
Posts: 1,119
I think I'd much rather depend on God to provide for my financial nightmare than some judge who is making a living hell out of someones life for only protecting himself.
shafter is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 08:40 AM   #68
scottaschultz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 27, 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 392
Quote:
I think I'd much rather depend on God to provide for my financial nightmare than some judge who is making a living hell out of someones life for only protecting himself.
But if you shot me, even by accident, don't you think God would want you to take responsibility for your own actions? Again, it is one thing if you can't pay, but it is quite another if you won't. If the latter is the case, why shouldn't a judge make you pay?
__________________
"I don't like repeat offenders, I like dead offenders!" Ted Nugent
scottaschultz is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 08:50 AM   #69
Glenn E. Meyer
Staff
 
Join Date: November 17, 2000
Posts: 15,698
That's a good point - if you are the moral actor and decide to intervene and accidentally shoot an innocent - your morality should mandate that you help with the damage you caused.

That you are a gun totin' hero doesn't remove that responsibility from you.

So let's ask the OP, if you intervene and shoot a good guy - would you liquidate your assets and downsize to pay the legit expenses of the shot up GG?

Sell your house?
Tell your kid, no fancy college?
No vacation for the family?

So would you? You are responsibile for your rounds. I understand laws that remove liabilty from you for shooting the BG but aren't laws that remove liability from you from shooting a GG, fundamentally selfish and immoral?
__________________
NRA, TSRA, IDPA, NTI, Polite Soc.
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...05_Feature.htm
Being an Academic Shooter
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...11_Feature.htm
Being an Active Shooter
Glenn E. Meyer is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 09:23 AM   #70
usaign
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2010
Posts: 73
The homeowner's insurance would cover most everything if I accidentally shot another person. Any person who hunts should have at least a million in liability coverage under their homeowner's policy. What you get is an umbrella policy over your current limits. The insurance company is entitled to pay for my defense.

So lets say I accidentally shoot someone else and they die. The homeowners insurance would come in and negotiate a settlement on my behalf. They would probably tender the limits in exchange for a full and final settlement of all claims. The victim's family would not have much choice but to accept the settlement. Lets say they did not accept the settlement then it may take years to litigate with an unknown outcome. The outcome may or may not be favorable. Lets say its favorable then how you going to collect?

So the answer to your question is to have a good insurance policy and company backing you. As for my assets, I dont have that much stuff that I could liquidate. My old car? My 1 year old laptop computer? I dont have a personal jet or Ferrari parked out back. I think you should just be happy that I have insurance to deal with such matters. Many folks who hunt dont have any insurance and so the only thing they can liquidate is the shirts in the closet.
usaign is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 09:41 AM   #71
Frank Ettin
Staff
 
Join Date: November 23, 2005
Location: California - San Francisco
Posts: 6,714
Quote:
Originally Posted by usaign
The homeowner's insurance would cover most everything if I accidentally shot another person. Any person who hunts should have at least a million in liability coverage under their homeowner's policy. ... The insurance company is entitled to pay for my defense.

So lets say I accidentally shoot someone else and they die. The homeowners insurance would come in and negotiate a settlement on my behalf...
Yes, and in real life your liability insurer isn't going to get involved unless I sue you, or at least have my lawyer write you a letter demanding payment, with the likelihood of a law suit hanging over your head.

Your liability insurer doesn't have any duty to me, as the person you injured. In your policy of liability insurance, your insurer promises you that it will (1) indemnify you against any loss that you become obligated to pay by reason of your legal fault; and (2) defend you against such claims.

Relying on your liability insurance is fine. But in the context of the question you asked, I will need to sue you, or threaten to sue you, to get your liability insurance to kick in.
Frank Ettin is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 09:43 AM   #72
Glenn E. Meyer
Staff
 
Join Date: November 17, 2000
Posts: 15,698
Why should I be happy that you have insurance that only partially covers my damages caused by you being a noncompetent shooter? That's a little bit of attitude.

If you didn't have insurance - the question is whether you feel morally compelled to tie your future financial assets to those of the person you shot?

If you left your current low assets state and had some cash - would you then look them up, find expenses not covered and then kick in.

Can't have it both ways - if you don't expect them to sue - then we expect you to do the max to help your victim.
__________________
NRA, TSRA, IDPA, NTI, Polite Soc.
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...05_Feature.htm
Being an Academic Shooter
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...11_Feature.htm
Being an Active Shooter
Glenn E. Meyer is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 10:05 AM   #73
usaign
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2010
Posts: 73
"Why should I be happy that you have insurance that only partially covers my damages caused by you being a noncompetent shooter?"

Who said my insurance would not be enough? I am aware of the settlements and awards in these types of cases and believe that it would be enough. I also believe my good samaritan actions would be taken into consideration. For example, if I held up a bank and shot someone then the award would be much higher then if I accidentally shot someone while trying to stop someone from holding up the bank.

Here are a few cases I found off the internet:

Maryland case- Accidental shooting (death) after a night of drinking 1.65 million
http://www.fredericknewspost.com/sec...storyid=106498

Florida settlement- Gunshot wound - muscle, nerve, tissue damage $600k
http://www.palmisanoandgoodman.com/C...ettlements.asp

Illinois settlement- Gunshot wound - left 21 year old male in recovery for 1 year - spinal injury - $425k
http://www.kosnerlaw.com/lawyer-attorney-1457904.html

Child loses site after hunting accident - 900k settlement
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2390354826

I would say that my insurance would probably be adequate for most cases. I believe my good samaritan actions would be accounted for i.e. it was an accidental shooting to stop a violent crime versus a purposeful or highly negligent act like playing with the pistol after a night of drinking.

Keep in mind, you are assuming the shooter is negligent. You are not negligent until the judge or jury rules that you are negligent. They could easily come back and say the shooter is not negligent.

As for my liability insurance kicking in...you can always file a claim directly with anyone's insurance company. All states have insurance regulations that state they must accept and investigate the claim. I could file a claim against you right now and just make something up. Your insurance company would be obligated by law to accept my claim, investigate the matter and then accept or deny it even if its an obviously bogus claim. Everything the insurer does is heavily regulated and governed by law. They have to respond to every claim presented to them.

Last edited by usaign; July 26, 2010 at 10:33 AM.
usaign is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 10:35 AM   #74
Glenn E. Meyer
Staff
 
Join Date: November 17, 2000
Posts: 15,698
Keep in mind that if you shoot the wrong person you did something wrong.

Also, shooting to keep someone from robbing a bank is thought not to be the wisest action. You shoot to prevent grievous bodily harm to innocents.

Saving the bank's money is really stupid if you take the risk of shooting an innocent. I might not hold you as responsible if you were saving a life and missed a shot. If it were the case that the bank robber was likely to leave with the cash and you went commando and plugged Granny - I would vote to take your stuff.

But you skirt the moral issue. You dance by saying your insurance is adequate and saying your good intentions would protect you. So you are about being protected by insurance and others for the consequences of your actions. Also, you look to others to give you the moral pass in a trial.

I'm saying - ok - yes, your insurance paid and your clever lawyer managed to get you off by getting the blood lust crowd from the Internet on the jury. But, it's you all alone with your conscience - do you kick in for expenses not covered. Or if you didn't have insurance to cover you (OH, insurance mitigates your common sense not to be a commando), do YOU feel that you need to suffer personal financial sacrifice for your actions?

If you don't get the point about saving lives as the necessary precondition to shoot - you need to rethink this.

I don't recall a Battle Cry - I have Insurance - Fire One!
__________________
NRA, TSRA, IDPA, NTI, Polite Soc.
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...05_Feature.htm
Being an Academic Shooter
http://www.teddytactical.com/archive...11_Feature.htm
Being an Active Shooter
Glenn E. Meyer is offline  
Old July 26, 2010, 10:37 AM   #75
Frank Ettin
Staff
 
Join Date: November 23, 2005
Location: California - San Francisco
Posts: 6,714
Quote:
Originally Posted by usaign
...Here are a few cases I found off the internet...
What do these have to do with anything? They are bare reports of settlement/judgment amounts. In each case, the victim may have received adequate compensation, or he/she may not have. The amounts recovered may have more to do with the amount of money available than with the extent of the victims losses.

And the $425K paid the 21 year old victim of a gunshot wound was a medical malpractice case. The hospital was sued because the patient developed a bed sore. The $425K had nothing to do with the damages/losses suffered by the victim as a result of the underlying gunshot injury.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usaign
...I believe my good samaritan actions would be accounted for i.e. it was an accidental shooting to stop a violent crime ....

Keep in mind, you are assuming the shooter is negligent. You are not negligent until the judge or jury rules that you are negligent. They could easily come back and say the shooter is not negligent....
[1] Yes, you will only be legally liable if you were legally at fault (e. g., negligent or reckless). And that's what litigation is about. In order to properly determine whether or not you were at fault, I might well need the investigatory tools available to me in litigation. So I'm back to having to sue you in any case.

[2] And in deciding whether you were at legal fault, the nature, quality and circumstances of your actions will be taken into account. A fair, shorthand definition of "negligence" is, "failure to act with the prudence that a reasonable person would exercise under the same circumstances."
Frank Ettin is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.15319 seconds with 8 queries