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Old June 7, 2010, 03:47 PM   #1
humanoid
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Colt gold Cup 1911 New or used Series 70?

I have noticed that the Series 70 gold cup 1911 goes for the same or a little more than a new gold cup.
I am assuming collect-ability is the reason??
Would it be smarter to buy the 70 Series assuming it will hold or even increase in value?
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Old June 7, 2010, 03:59 PM   #2
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A minty S70 will hold its value if you don't shoot it. The difference in value between 100% and 95% condition is hundreds of dollars, so if you intend to shoot the gun you buy, get the new one.
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Old June 7, 2010, 04:01 PM   #3
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Buying a firearm for an investment is never that great of an idea. There is no telling what will be collectible and/or valuable down the road and what won't.

Yes, original Series 70 Colt 1911's are somewhat collectible. Many people also buy them to customize, as they make great base guns and usually you don't have to replace many of the small parts.

That said, in 20 or 30 years a new production Colt Gold Cup Trophy will probably be somewhat collectible also. Out of all the standard production 1911's out there, Colt's seem to hold their value the best. They are, after all, the original, and the name itself just seems to have a lot of weight and history behind it.

I suggest that you buy the gun that you will prefer to shoot, and not worry about what it will be worth in the future. If you want a target style pistol, then buy a new Colt Gold Cup. If you want something more plain and G.I. like, look for an older Series 70 or try one of the new reproduction Series 70's.

As a side note, if you want the gun to retain it's value, don't mess with it. The unmolested and unmodified guns always bring the most money from collectors.
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Old June 7, 2010, 04:50 PM   #4
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I'm not sure the price difference you are seeing is "collectability" ....vs just people like the older series 70 guns.

Buying as an investment is hard to do / even if you don't shoot it --- because its hard to tell what will be popular in 10, 20, 30 yrs. However, in general, I do think a well tuned 1911 will hold its value pretty well - whether you shoot it or not.

If you're looking for an investment / I don't think Colt is where you ought to put your money ....vs a Wilson Combat or a higher end 1911 / but if you're looking for a decent gun to shoot, I don't see any reason why the Colt won't be fine.
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Old June 7, 2010, 08:39 PM   #5
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Thanks for the good advice. I am looking for a target shooter. I just noticed how the value is way up on the 70 series gold cup. I guess I need put both of them in my hands and decide which I like the best. Guess I was dreaming that I could buy a gun, shoot it some and have it be worth more than I paid in later years. It doesnt hurt to dream.
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Old June 7, 2010, 11:35 PM   #6
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I'd go with the series 70, the new gold cups have problems getting the trigger just right. Something to do with that cocking dealie on the post series 70s.
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Old June 8, 2010, 03:34 AM   #7
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Guess I was dreaming that I could buy a gun, shoot it some and have it be worth more than I paid in later years. It doesnt hurt to dream.
It can be done. I have owned my fair share of guns over the years (buying and selling), and have actually made money; albeit not a whole lot, and it has taken literally decades, and then if you take into account inflation/devaluation of the dollar and all of the rounds shot out of all of those guns...

I buy guns because I think that a particular model may be interesting to shoot. If I don't really care for it, sell it and on to the next candidate. If I really like it, I keep it. This has been my process for decades (I bought a relatively small safe with this in mind). I have my "keepers"and my "trying them outs".

It all depends on just how many rounds you want to put down range. If I were going to put many many downrange with the Gold Cup that you are considering, I would go with new. If not so many, I would probably opt for the series 70; unless the series 70 was LNIB or NIB and all stock or worked on by a really reputable smith, then definitely the 70. (I personally like new or "low mileage" guns to begin with. I am amazed at how many LNIB or NIB guns are out there that are years old.)

YMMV
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Old June 8, 2010, 08:21 AM   #8
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Forget the investment stuff, it's always a gamble.
Go for the best trigger... the simpler fewer parts is the Series 70.
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Old June 8, 2010, 09:44 AM   #9
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SmokyBaer's advice is spot on. I still shoot my Series 70 Gold Cup that I bought new in 1974 (for $204.00 ) in Bullseye matches. The pistol is worth more than I paid for it and the trigger is much better than any of the latest Gold Cup variants imo.
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Old June 8, 2010, 02:20 PM   #10
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If you shop around you can find a nice used '70 series for a good price and if you take good care of it you can shoot it plenty and not lose money.
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Old June 8, 2010, 03:08 PM   #11
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Go for the best trigger... the simpler fewer parts is the Series 70.
That's not necessarily true. One thing I really hate about the older GCs is the sear depressor mechanism that ensures you don't have trigger bounce with that big, heavy steel trigger. It's a far greater pain to reassemble the hammer/sear group of a Series 70 GC than it is with the firing pin safety found in the series '80s. All current GCs don't use this any more because they're using lighter aluminum triggers.
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Old June 8, 2010, 04:32 PM   #12
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I've got a Colt gold cup national match trophy - Series 80. The trigger is as good as anything I've felt on Series 70 guns. I've heard people for years claim they can feel the difference between a finely tuned Series 70 trigger and a finely tuned Series 80 trigger. I can't. And, I just don't believe it....but to each his own, I guess.
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Old June 9, 2010, 03:07 PM   #13
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If you're looking for an investment / I don't think Colt is where you ought to put your money
Are you kidding? Have you saw the price of vintage Colt's lately? I 100% disagree. Colt is so rich in history, handgun and American history that IMO there will always be a Colt collector. Many of the Colt models that once were, will most likely never be made again. This is however coming from someone who does invest in guns. When I invest, however, I do buy used guns or NOS, I don't invest by paying retail for guns. I know that I cannot predict the future, so I simply buy guns that have been collected for many years such as WWII guns, Colts, S&Ws, pre 64 Winchesters etc. While the adage of no one can predict the future is true, that also can be applied to the stock market and several other ways of investing. When one invests, its not necessary to "know the future" when one can use logical reasoning in an effort to make a prediction. No one knows any part of the future, so you must speculate when investing. Taking a risk is almost always the first part in getting a reward.

I say buy the series 70 1911 because for now and the next 5+ years it will be easier to sell due to its desireability and if you buy it right, it will be much easier to profit on than a colt 1911 that you pay retail for today.
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Old June 9, 2010, 04:16 PM   #14
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I say buy the series 70 1911 because for now and the next 5+ years it will be easier to sell
I think you'd get a better deal on Series 80 guns. There's way too much hype about series 70 guns and folks try to get a premium for them. While a good series 80 guns performs just as well and has a (now somewhat unpopular) extra safety feature. You hear all these 1911 purists complain and cry about the extra little safety feature of the series 80 guns. It's completely bogus, if you ask me.

Just ask those 1911 Purists to get rid of their grip safety (1911's weren't originally designed with grip safeties) and watch how they start yammering about: "grip safety is a good idea...." "grip safety is what makes the 1911 uniques..." "get rid of your grip safety and watch the prosecutor make a fool out of you in front of a jury...."

So, buy excelent quality that ins't in large demand right now - buy Series 80 Colts.
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Old June 9, 2010, 07:00 PM   #15
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Just ask those 1911 Purists to get rid of their grip safety (1911's weren't originally designed with grip safeties)
I believe you mean thumb safety. Browning's original prototype pistol had a grip safety (a common feature on most of his auto designs), but was lacking a thumb safety. It was added at the request of the military.

If the OP is looking for a gun to go target shooting with, then I suggest he get a new Series 80 Gold Cup Trophy. It's much more suited to punch paper than a Series 70 (old or repro). It will likely appreciate in value just like most other Colt's over the next 10 or 20 years. Stainless would be a good option also because it's more wear resistant than blue.

Just remember, if you want the gun to maintain it's value, there are a few tricks that you can do to help it out. Save all of your original paper work that comes with the gun. Save the box also, and keep it in good shape. The biggest one is don't mess with the gun itself. Box stock Colt's always bring higher prices than ones that have been modified, even if the modifications can be reversed.
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Old June 9, 2010, 10:12 PM   #16
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The Series 70 Colt is hard to beat IMO.
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Old June 10, 2010, 11:57 AM   #17
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If the OP is looking for a gun to go target shooting with, then I suggest he get a new Series 80 Gold Cup Trophy. It's much more suited to punch paper than a Series 70 (old or repro).
I'd be interesting in hearing your rationale for this claim. Just how are the Series 80 Gold Cup Trophies "much more suited" for target shooting than my Series 70 Gold Cup? As mentioned in my earlier post, I've shot my circa 1974 Gold Cup extensively in Bullseye sanctioned shoots over the past several decades with great success and it will be traveling with me to Camp Perry again next month. I'm not arguing with you, just curious about why you think the way you do.
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Old June 10, 2010, 12:13 PM   #18
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I'd be interesting in hearing your rationale for this claim. Just how are the Series 80 Gold Cup Trophies "much more suited" for target shooting than my Series 70 Gold Cup?
That would be my bad. When I was responding for some reason I was thinking the OP was comparing a regular Series 70 Government Model against a Series 80 Gold Cup Trophy. In that case the Gold Cup Trophy will win as it would make the better target gun.

However, if the OP is comparing a Series 70 Gold Cup to a Series 80 Gold Cup, then it's a little more difficult to decide. Both make great target guns, and I would suggest that the OP try to hold an example of each to see which he likes the best.

New Series 80 GCT's have a ring hammer and Colt's "Duckbill" grip safety, which he may like better than the G.I. hammer and grip safety of a Series 70 GCNM. They are also available in stainless, which will hold up better over a long period of time than blue. The stainless versions come with Bomar style adjustable sights where than the Series 70 GCNM's come with Elliason style adjustable sights.

Both guns are likely to appreciate in value in the future, and the triggers can be tuned to your liking on both guns. I would chose a new gun, because my preference is for new guns. You would also be getting a warranty if you buy the new Colt, where you wouldn't if you would buy the Series 70 GCNM.
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Old June 10, 2010, 12:59 PM   #19
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People make too big a deal over the relatively insignificant difference between a well tuned series 70 and a well tuned series 80. Both make excelent target/competition guns. I can't feel the difference in the break of the trigger....I seriously doubt that anyone can if you blindfold them so they don't know which gun they are firing.

Again, I'm talking about tuned Colt 1911's, not your basic model out-of-the-box gun. The Series 80 has a firing pin block safety - if you just can't stand it being there, it's easy enough to remove.

Last edited by Skans; June 10, 2010 at 01:10 PM.
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Old June 10, 2010, 08:08 PM   #20
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All this talk about Colts, and no pictures?!?
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Old June 10, 2010, 08:14 PM   #21
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FWIW, I have a new colt gold cup trophy stainless and it is the best shooting pistol I have ever had. The trigger on mine is great out of the box. I shoot better groups with it than I do with my wilson.

My dealer got two in at the same time. My friend got the other one and his shoots as good as mine. I think colts quality has really improved in recent years.

Based on my experience, I would recommend the new gun without reservation.
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Old June 11, 2010, 07:16 AM   #22
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I shoot better groups with it than I do with my wilson.
Wow... You gotta keeper!! They are sometimes hard to find.
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Old June 11, 2010, 08:01 AM   #23
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I say buy the series 70 1911 because for now and the next 5+ years it will be easier to sell
I think you'd get a better deal on Series 80 guns. There's way too much hype about series 70 guns and folks try to get a premium for them.
While I think your statement is perfectly reasonable, when selling a gun, I want the one that has the unsubstantiated (or substantiated) hype (I don't know wether its true or not, I own a series 70 commander and I like it but I never handled a series 80) because the hype will most likely never go away. The series 70, whether its true or not, has the majority opinion that its better and therefor will be an easier gun to sell. Now with that said, I say try to find a series 70 for the price of a series 80. Obviously you don't want to pay a series 70 price for a series 70, unless of course, money is no object.
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Old June 11, 2010, 08:03 AM   #24
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Here's a not-so-good picture of my Colt - trying on a pair of pearl grips - I know, too much bling

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