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Old April 30, 2010, 07:08 PM   #1
salvadore
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liner

Does anyone know how much it costs to have a barrel relined, specifically a mosin nagant?
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Old April 30, 2010, 11:25 PM   #2
Scorch
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It will cost as much as a new barrel, typically right around $400, and is usually used as a means to restore the bore and chamber while retaining the original markings on the outside of the barrel on rifles having collector or sentimental value. Since you could buy several Mosin-Nagants for $400, I would suggest looking for a replacement barrel or a replacement rifle.

Numrich has replacement barrels for a very reasonable price:
http://www.gunpartscorp.com/catalog/...740&catid=3256
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Old May 1, 2010, 12:24 PM   #3
jaguarxk120
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At the prices they sell for, use it as a wall hanger and by another one.
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Old May 1, 2010, 02:07 PM   #4
Jim Watson
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I'm not sure it could be done.
Those old military barrels are pretty skinny and I wonder if there is room for a thick enough liner to take the pressure. You can't assume a perfect bond between liner and barrel. A gunzine writer once found a split in a .41 Magnjum liner where there was a void between it and the original barrel.
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Old May 1, 2010, 04:08 PM   #5
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Liner !

Absolutely do not put a liner in a high pressure rifle like that. If somebody offers to do it, DO NOT. It is not even remotely safe. I doubt if anyone would make a liner in that twist rate for you anyway. The previous poster is correct, not enough barrel wall on the Russian for the pressure.
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Old May 1, 2010, 07:59 PM   #6
James K
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Here is the scoop on liners.

When a barrel is drilled and reamed for a liner, the bore is not perfect, and even the best workman cannot install a liner that will be absolutely tight all the way. Also, there must be enough gap for the solder or glue that will be used to fix the liner in place. Typical liners are fairly thin and if used with a high pressure round will expand outward to fill any gaps between the liner and the inside of the barrel. The result is an uneven barrel that is not good for accuracy, plus possibly being unsafe. In brief, the liner must contain the pressure by itself, which means they are limited to low pressure cartridges.
(For a .22 LR (.223" groove diameter) liner, the barrel is drilled to .315", so the liner wall is at the groove bottom is .046" (a dime is about .052" thick).

There is another way, but much more expensive, and that is to take a barrel of the desired caliber and turn it down, leaving enough metal to be safe with the intended ammunition. The original barrel is then drilled and reamed out so it is nothing but a hollow shell, with just enough metal to retain its shape. The new barrel (not really a liner in the normal sense) is inserted into the shell. This is done in rare cases where there is a need to retain the original barrel shape and markings but to make a shootable rifle. Since the former condition usually applies to collector pieces, and collectors rarely want to shoot valuable rifles, that kind of "lining" is both uncommon and horribly expensive. It is a lot easier and cheaper to simply install the new barrel in the normal manner.

Jim.
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Old May 2, 2010, 11:15 AM   #7
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Here is the real scoop on liners. Most barrel makers use 4140 on liners above .22 caliber, so what you have is a thin barrel. If the barrel is tapered, you have to turn steps on the liner to accommodate the taper and drill the steps into the barrel. About the same as turning down a barrel, but a lot faster. I have done a lot of things the "Book" says never to do because I found a way around it. I would not hesitate to put a double threaded sleeve on a barrel and install it, but the idea of soldering a sheet metal-thin thread to a liner and cranking it on a rifle generating 50,000+ pressure is just plain dangerous. Check the barrel diameter at the thread and right in front of the chamber, and then look at the diameter of the cartridge. I would not do it and I don't know anybody that would. The only safe way would be to install a blank that was turned or ground back to the rear sight to fit a section of the original barrel drilled out as thin as possible. Hide the splice under the rear sight assy., and live with the chamber area not being original.
This may come up twice, having computer problems.

Last edited by Gunplummer; May 2, 2010 at 11:21 AM. Reason: Computer problems
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Old May 2, 2010, 11:21 AM   #8
Gunplummer
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Here is the real scoop on liners. Most barrel makers use 4140 on liners above .22 caliber, so what you have is a thin barrel. If the barrel is tapered, you have to turn steps on the liner to accommodate the taper and drill the steps into the barrel. About the same as turning down a barrel, but a lot faster. I have done a lot of things the "Book" says never to do because I found a way around it. I would not hesitate to put a double threaded sleeve on a barrel and install it, but the idea of soldering a sheet metal-thin thread to a liner and cranking it on a rifle generating 50,000+ pressure is just plain dangerous. Check the barrel diameter at the thread and right in front of the chamber, and then look at the diameter of the cartridge. I would not do it and I don't know anybody that would. The only safe way would be to install a blank that was turned or ground back to the rear sight to fit a section of the original barrel drilled out as thin as possible. Hide the splice under the rear sight assy., and live with the chamber area not being original
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Old May 4, 2010, 03:59 PM   #9
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Thanks for the info, I was under the impression barrel liner stuff was cheap. The gun shoots round holes so I guess I'm stabilized, but after days and days of scrubbing I still get black and bluegreen patches, and it still looks lunar in the lands and grooves. Thanks guys.
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Old May 4, 2010, 06:15 PM   #10
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Did you do a hot water rinse before you started your cleaning odyssey? You might have left-over salts from corrosive ammo in there, you can run patches with solvent until Xmas and not see an improvement.
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Old May 5, 2010, 04:08 PM   #11
salvadore
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No I didn't, but if you tell what is involved I will. Thanks.
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Old May 5, 2010, 07:07 PM   #12
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Just rinse the barrel with hot water (distilled if you have). You want hot so it dries quickly and doesn't add to corrosion. It dissolves any salts in the barrel and flushes them out.
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