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Old March 28, 2010, 06:53 PM   #1
dieseldirt
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Join Date: March 19, 2010
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turkey setup, please help a new guy out

I am going to order some turkey hunting stuff tomorrow it looks like. Must be from Cabelas & Midway. I have a Rem 870 Mag, 28" barrel w/ bead.
Here's what I'm looking at getting:

Chokes:
*please help me pick which one*
Carlson's super-full ported
or
primos x-full tight-wad

Call: primos box cutter
Do I really need a slate call as well?

Shot: Looking at 3" #5 .... Want to get either Remington copper plated mag or Winchester Supremes... May get both and see which one works better.
*or* Should I just get the cheaper Remington Nitro Turkey loads?

also somebody recommended this video, i am trying to be tight with the cash here so obviously a dvd is not a must, but i have never turkey hunted before (just deer, small game) so i will naturally be a sucker for this kind of thing. anybody?


thanks for the help!


ps already got blind, face paint, and decoys taken care of.
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Old March 28, 2010, 07:46 PM   #2
Todd1700
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I spend way too much on this stuff myself but if I were on a budget here's what I'd go with. Good chokes that aren't too bad. Primos Jellyhead or Undertaker by hunters specialties in a .665 constriction. Of the standard lead turkey loads I think Winchester Supremes are the best. For a box call get a Lynch Fool Proof. So simple a child or even a politician can use it and yet sounds as good as any high dollar box call out there.

The problem is of course that every shotgun can be unique in what choke/shell combination it likes. And sadly there is just no way to know for certain what yours will pattern well until you shoot it.
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Old March 29, 2010, 08:34 AM   #3
SCcdp
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I 2nd the Lynches' call. That call has killed more turkey's than Avian Flu!! Seriously, great call for the money.

I carry a box call, 2 different pot calls, a wingbone and a selection of mouth calls. You DO NOT need all this to kill a turkey, but I would add a slate or crystal pot call to my list of things to have along with that box call you are going to buy. Some days the turkey's may respond to a different sound, and working a turkey in close has always been easier for me with a pot call, but I use the box to strike birds and when I want a lot of volume.


If it were me I'd scour the internet listening to sound bytes and anything I could find about turkey hunting. There is a lot of bs out there but there are also a lot of good hunters posting stuff up as well.

The Jellyhead is a good choke, but whatever you settle on. PATTERN IT!!! Shoot it enough so you can be comfortable out to 30-35 yards and let that be your max distance. When you think the turkey's in range let him take another ten steps!!

If you have anymore questions holler at me. I'm not a master turkey hunter but I've been doing it a long time and I sure love to talk about it! 2 more days till the season opens here!!!!

Matt
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Old March 29, 2010, 04:12 PM   #4
markj
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When the pilgrams set foot here they found turkeys all over the place. Why? Cause the Indians didnt kill them, they felt it was wrong to kill something so stupid.

I use a set of binocs to see where they are, then I stalk them till I am close enough for a kill. No camo, no calls, no fake turkeys just me and the turkey. In spring the toms are easy to spot, they puff up real nice, try to find a group with many toms as they will be all about showing off for the gals. Makes them easy to sneak up on. They also make a lot of noise, easy to sneak up on. I use a 11-87 with a full choke and 3 in mag in 4 shot. Hit them in the neck or head, they are too fat for a body shot to be effective unless you ruin the meat.

Good luck, hope you have a lot of turkeys as we do.
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Old March 29, 2010, 05:58 PM   #5
shortwave
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You've got some good advice.

Have you got an area picked out to hunt in? If so, what is the terrain like? Is it thick cover or open?
Reason I ask is cause I've used #4's up to #7 1/2 shot. If your in heavier brushy cover you may want to lean towards a heavier shot as long as your shotgun patterns it well. Open setting (field edges/mature woods) go with the lighter shot.

Scouting and Roosting turkeys in the evening is a great way to get a general idea where they'll be in the morning.
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Old March 29, 2010, 06:11 PM   #6
SCcdp
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MarkJ - I'm not sure what the turkeys are like in Iowa but they are considerably harder to kill here in the woods and swamps of South Carolina.
I'd be interested in a seeing a video of you stalking these "loud and dumb" turkeys that you have around you. You have mostly Easterns in your part of Iowa?

Also, body shots aren't a great idea not because they are "fat" but because their wings and feathers are relatively heavy. But wings can be broken pretty easily with a load of 4's at a moderate distance.

Last edited by SCcdp; March 29, 2010 at 07:21 PM.
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Old March 30, 2010, 04:15 AM   #7
shortwave
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Your right SCcdp.

I've killed a gang of wild turkey's and don't believe I've ever killed a fat one. Their feathers are like a coat of armor that buckshot will not penetrate at the usual hunting range.

Also diesel, make sure and check your hunting regs as to what size shot is legal, hunting times etc. Things may vary from state to state.

Wish you were closer, always love to take a person out turkey hunting for their first time.
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Old April 1, 2010, 04:24 PM   #8
markj
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Here where I live, them turkeys are all over the place. I see flocks every morning on my way into town. Areas are large fields, open ground mixed with forest hills. With the rolloing ground you have natural cover for a stalk. As I said, we wait till 10:00 or so when they are done eating, they then play around, toms swell up trying to get the females to follow em. This is when the stalk works. Last one I shot was chasing another around some evergreens. I snuck up to 30 yards, he run around the tree saw me and I shot him in the head. Spring turkey starts next week, all that will hunt in our group usually get their bird early on.

We farm and as such we see the game every day. Deer are same, too many, so we can get extra tags (landowner) for almost nothing.

Turkeys are not "fat" like a cow but thick with meat in the chest. I never shoot one in the body.

I live in what is called the Loess Hills of Iowa, look it up as it is a geological type of ground found in 2 places in the world. A cool region to live for hunters..

http://www.igsb.uiowa.edu/Browse/loess/loess.htm
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Old April 2, 2010, 10:18 AM   #9
SCcdp
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Y'all only get one tag per hunter?? Man that would suck. We get 5 here in SC. I went this am and called one into 45 yards for a buddy but he couldn't a clear shot at him. Heard 6 or 7 different gobblers...one of them will die either tomorrow or Sunday.
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Old April 2, 2010, 03:47 PM   #10
markj
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We have 4 seasons with shotgun and a archery season. In my area where I live there are quite a few flocks of 50 or more. They are fast becoming pests. I have been watching some large Toms and will be ready opening day. If they are in this one field it will be easy, just get down into the creek and follow it to a landmark, come up out of there and maybe a fast shot. Maybe some more stalking.


Went on a firecall tuesday, 2 guys went into a forested area, cut down brush, pilied it up and set fire to it. Well the whole field went up one firefighter went to the hospital. Guys were going to hunt turkey there, no permission, no heads up to the landowner. What goes on in some guys minds?

Deputy took em away after DNR tickted them. Guess they wont be hunting there.
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Old April 3, 2010, 06:15 PM   #11
Hunting Jim
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I've hunted turkeys in WI. and now WA. Eastern, Merriam, & Rio all react the same way if you put the shot string in the right place. I invested in a Browning BPS with a 20" barrel, rifle sights, and an after-market .665 choke. I apply camo tape and a sling and I'm ready to hunt. Our season starts April 15th and ends the last of May. I've shot a lot of birds, mostly with #5 Turkey loads by Federal. I use a box call, two slates, one aluminum, and one glass. I've never been able to effectively use a diaphragm call, so I don't have any. I use a head net over my hat to try and create a different profile,and to mask my glasses, my white skin, and my eye movements. I believe that turkeys can see you blink if you get too close. Decoys are a good thing.I've used them for almost 25 years,I've still got the first one I ever bought. They last a long time if you take care of them in and out of the field. If you use decoys a lot, you'll have days when the Toms just will not come close enough. They will strut,drum,gobble, and wait for those decoys to come to them. When that happens I will wait until the Toms are gone and take down the decoys.
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Old April 5, 2010, 01:35 AM   #12
bamaranger
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useful gear

Hey!

My most useful piece of turkey gear is my turkey vest! I don't see how I ever got by w/o one.

Mines a strap version, as opposed to a jacket version, which works great for here in Al where it heats up fast. All my calls, ammo, camo gloves and net, some small blind mesh, a hen decoy, etc, go in the vest. No matter what clothes I wear for the hunt, the vest with all the gear goes along everytime, nothing left in the truck or pants pocket.

Get one if you haven't, you won't regret it.

Oh yeah, there must be some really dumb (and blind) turkeys in Iowa.
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Old April 5, 2010, 04:44 PM   #13
markj
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Quote:
Oh yeah, there must be some really dumb (and blind) turkeys in Iowa.
Now that there is funny, I saw a flock this morning, had many a tom strutting up, now I also see a creek runs right close to them. If it was season I would get down in that creek and stalk them turkeys. It is how I do it every year, I just cant sit still.

Wed used to play at this as kids, my brother and I used to sneak up on all sorts of wild animals. It isnt hard if you have patients and can keep the mouth shut. Tried to teach my city cousins but never was able too.

Next time you go out, take some binocs, scope it out, find where they are at after chow time is over, they will be playing (youngins) and strutting (toms) they keep their attention on the prize and not so much on surroundings. Like a buck in rut (I snuck up on one and shot him off the doe he was on). I get real close, come on out and I will try to show ya. I have pics of the turkeys I have shot in this way, isnt too hard to get close.

Never could call a tom in during spring rut, fall yes. Spring time he wants all the ladies he can see. Good luck to you all anyway, hope the hunt is good and a bird gets taken.
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Old April 6, 2010, 02:51 AM   #14
bamaranger
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ammo

I see where you mentioned ammo in your OP.

I'm now a big fan of Win Supreme High Velocity , the 3", 1-5/8 oz load, #5.
Darn stuff just seems to hit harder. In my stubby turkey gun, I suspect the various 2 oz (I even shot 2-1/4 oz loads for awhile) were not getting enough steam up to be as effective as I'd like.

After shooting #6 for years, I switched to #5 shot after reading an article discussing the amount of energy needed for a pellet to break a turkey neck bone. Number 6 shot ran out of energy pretty quick. The bigger pellets won hands down past 30 yds. I think Win did the research, and the article ran in "the Rifleman" . Fives seem a good compromise, #4 has always been a bit thin in my gun.

I'd like all my shots under 30 yds, but it doesn't always happen that way.

+1 on patterning your rig.
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