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Old March 21, 2010, 10:37 AM   #1
Not_U
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reloading both pistol and rifle?

I know another post on which to buy...but after lurking on the forum for a few days I still am confused. I know I want a single stage for the accuracy when it comes to the rifle, but for some of my plinking (.22 and such) I would like a progressive. Some of the threads I have come across make it sound as though there is a single stage that, with additions, can be converted into a progressive...is this true? And as always here is the question...which is the best single stage (w/ ability to go progressive) for reloading both rifle and pistol.
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Old March 21, 2010, 10:43 AM   #2
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What kind of rifle? If your feeding a hungry AR a progressive wouldn't be bad for 223 or 7.62x39mm. If your doing precision work a single stage wins.
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Old March 21, 2010, 10:59 AM   #3
Not_U
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Oh I guess that would be helpful info. The rifle is a .375 RUM and the hand guns are the wife's .45 and .22 and eventually my .44 mag and S&W .460 but these are backup guns for hog and bear hunting so they don't see as much use...
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Old March 21, 2010, 11:06 AM   #4
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Probably at turret press or single stage. It's gonna take some force to resize a 375.
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Old March 21, 2010, 01:34 PM   #5
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RCBS has (had?) "Piggyback" adapters for their rockchucker single stage presses that would turn them into a progressive, with variable success. IMHO, a true progressive will be more reliable than an adapter for a single stage press, particularly if you cannot leave the adapter bolted to the single stage press full time. At that point, you've given up that single stage press, and will need another anyway.

Andy
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Old March 21, 2010, 01:43 PM   #6
Brian Pfleuger
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If you're talking about "22" as in 22LR then you need to know that you cannot reload those rounds. Theoretically, it can be done but in practical terms it is not possible.

To your question on the press choice, I would imagine that a turret press would meet your needs nicely.
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Old March 21, 2010, 01:56 PM   #7
DocAitch
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Press Recommendation

Reloading .22LR (and .22mag, longs ,and shorts) is not do-able (if that is the .22 to which you refer).
Most folks will recommend learning reloading on a single stage press and there many recommendations out there. Get a copy of the ABCs of Reloading and read it before making any purchases.
Hornady makes Lock-N Load Progressive and Dillon makes the 550 and 650. These are all relatively expensive, and have reputations as good performers for pistol rounds. I have the 650 and can speak for its excellence.
There is less need of the progressive press for rifle rounds because most folks will seldom shoot more than 60-80 rounds per session, while an active pistol shooter often exceeds 200 rounds per practice.
Neophytes should generally avoid the Lee 1000, it has primer issues that require you to be on your toes.
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Old March 21, 2010, 01:57 PM   #8
Jim243
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None that I am aware of. Single stage are just that and progressive are just that. Can a Zebra change from stripes to spots (I don't think so).

You need to purchase a LEE Classic Turret Press, it can be used single stage or as a turret press.


The other alternitive is to get a Rock Chucker single stage press and then by the conversion kit at $450.00 (for the kit) to make it a MANUAL index progressive (you do not want a manual indexing progressive, take my word on this)

or https://shop.rcbs.com/WebConnect/Mai...&route=C04J147

for $1,150.00

Go with the LEE

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct...tNumber=814175
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Old March 21, 2010, 02:33 PM   #9
Tuzo
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Pardon me if you have already read a manual or two about reloading. If not, then the Sierra, Lyman, or Lee manuals are recommended to educate yourself about reloading. The Lee manual is an overgrown Lee sales brochure but with useful information. Lyman is very informative but with a tilt towards Lyman reloading products and components. Sierra is more neutral, highly informative, and gives a slight nod to RCBS equipment.

Have fun.
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Old March 22, 2010, 09:11 PM   #10
BigJakeJ1s
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Most progressive presses can be used as a single stage or a turret press. If you remove all but the die/tool you want to use, then it is a single stage press, but you can still use the auto-index, auto-eject and case feeder (if you have one). The LNL is probably easiest to do this way, with its individually removable dies instead of a tool head.

For turret operation, just load a new piece of brass every 5th pull of the handle (right after it ejects the finished round). You can't use your case feeder for this, but auto-index and auto-eject work fine. The Dillon 650 primer feed will keep feeding new primers for every pull of the handle, but the 550, the LNL AP and the RCBS 2000 only feed a new primer after the previous one is used.

Andy
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Old March 22, 2010, 09:49 PM   #11
reloader28
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RCBS does have the Piggyback to go on a Rockchucker like was already stated. I still use one for pistols and have had very good sucsess with it. Very few problems with mine.
I normaly leave it on one press and use my other 2 single stages for rifles, but sometimes its nice to have the third press for test loads.
The nice thing is, in about 1 - 2 minutes you can easily take it off and convert back to single stage if you only have one press.

Last edited by reloader28; March 23, 2010 at 07:43 AM.
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Old March 22, 2010, 11:17 PM   #12
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Arguably the most accurate press is the Forster Co-Ax
http://www.forsterproducts.com/store...22&catid=19938

As far as single stages producing ammo that has more concentricity (runout) than the progressives, it all depends on the which single stage is compared to which progressive.

I have 2 single stage (Herters & Pacific) presses and 2 progressives (LNL AP and 550) and have loaded extensively on my hunting buddies 650. We did some prety comprehensive tests using 4 different rifle cartridges on the 5 different presses. To our surprise, the LNL AP was measureably better than the others.

Whether or not you "need" a progressive depends on your number of cartridges loaded per week/month. If you are not shooting more than a thousand rounds of one cartridge per month, you probably would do better on a Lee Classic Turret.
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Old March 23, 2010, 01:15 AM   #13
Lost Sheep
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Welcome and good luck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Not_U
Oh I guess that would be helpful info. The rifle is a .375 RUM and the hand guns are the wife's .45 and .22 and eventually my .44 mag and S&W .460 but these are backup guns for hog and bear hunting so they don't see as much use...
Welcome to the forum and welcome to your new obsession. Thanks for asking our advice.

Tell us a little about yourself so we can give better opinions, based on your particular circumstances.

About your needs... How much of each chambering do you shoot now and how much do you intend to shoot in the next year? Are you specifically interested in maximizing accuracy? or minimizing cost (the answers for each caliber might be different). What do you seek to gain by reloading? (My goal was to be able to shoot, as I knew when I bought my first gun, I could not afford to shoot if I had to pay retail for the ammo.)

About your more powerful handguns seeing limited use. Remember that the .460 Smith and the 44 (and even the .375 RUM) can be loaded down to mild levels (with care). My shooting buddy and I enjoy plinking with his 500 Smith (loaded down with Trail Boss Powder to about 800 fps with 300 grain slugs). When rolling your own, you can "dial in" whatever power levels you want (within reason).

You mentioned "eventually the 45 and 44" Those are probably the easiest to reload for, so a good place to learn. On the other hand, some people's learning style suggest starting with the most complex (of the ones you listed, that would be your .375 RUM and getting familiar there first before moving to the simpler straight-walled pistol cartridges, and the simplest , the straight-walled rimmed case of the 44 Mag.

First, let me second DocAitch's suggestion to get a copy of The ABC's of Reloading. it is an excellent tome. While a little short on load data, it give a good overview of the reloading process. Lyman's loading manual is excellent, as well. All the reloading manuals (except the very good series of pamphlets entitled "One cartridge, one book" which is long on data but short on instruction) have their first chapters dedicated to describing the process and defining the terms. Each one has its own style, so borrow, buy, or check out from the library at least three different books and read through the first few chapters of each (the ones devoted to describing the process)

Also check out the excellent thread "stickied" to the top of this forum entitled: "For the New Reloader: Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST".

Then do a search on this part of the forum for phrases like "Noob...reloadinging" "Newbie", "Beginning reloader" and such.

In a week or two your questions will be better informed and more to the point regarding your needs.

Good luck, always wear eye protection, especially when working with primers and don't pinch your fingers in your press.

Lost Sheep

caveats:

Remember, only believe half of what you see and one quarter of what you hear. That goes double for what you get from the internet. Even this post. Do your own independent, confirming research when ANYONE gives you new facts on the web.

Also remember, even the idiotic stuff might have a kernel of truth buried in there somewhere.

Lost Sheep

disclaimer: If my advice seems over-obvious, remember that other readers of all experience levels are reading. I take great pains to be very specific and to prevent multiple (conflicting) or confusing interpretations, and don't always succeed.
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Old March 24, 2010, 06:35 PM   #14
Not_U
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Thanks for all the info and suggestions, I had no clue that reloading would have so many variables. Lost Sheep wow you just blew my mind with how much I did not know but let me see what I can answer for you...

I currently don't shoot all that much, lets say 100 - 200 rounds every month for the .45 ACP, much less when it comes to the larger calibers. Price is part of the reason, the .375 RUM is roughly $4.50 a shot. I am looking for accuracy and reduced cost.

Most people ask me why in the hell I have a .375 Rum and promptly tell me it is over powered for anything in the lower 48. While trying to decide on a rifle I came across the .375 RUM and read that people were light loading them down to the ballistics of a 30-06. The way I see it I can have one gun and go from deer to grizzly or larger if I ever hit the lottery and get my African safari. So in short yes I do plan on loading down the larger calibers.

Yes I have been reading the sticky at the top of the forum and it seems to answer one question and give me two more...I already ordered the book online and waiting for it to arrive.

Thanks again for pointing me int he right direction and I'm sure I'll be back with some questions in a month or so when I have done some more research and such.
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