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Old February 21, 2010, 06:38 PM   #26
TheNatureBoy
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Shot placement isn't limited to a .243 rifle although many believe that to be the case. Fact of the matter is that shot placement is essential with any rifle. When hunting deer regardless of the caliber I hunt with I aim for the vitals. As far as a .243 is concerned a friend of mine goes out west to hunt elk every year. He bought back a picture of one that was taken with a .243/100 gr. I hunt with guys that have taken deer with 75 grain pills.
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Old February 21, 2010, 06:47 PM   #27
James R. Burke
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Seems like most folks do think shot placement is important with any caliber from what I been reading, and it is. I new a guy who had a big black bear coming into his garbage pit at his camp years ago when folks done that. He got up in the middle of the nite, and took a shot with a pistol using a 22 short he thought over its head. The next morning that bear way lying there dead. But I would not use it to bear hunt with.

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Old February 21, 2010, 07:05 PM   #28
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Ive heard of people taking out deer with a .17 HMR. It is all about shot placement.
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Old February 21, 2010, 07:22 PM   #29
James R. Burke
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Yup. Lots with a 22 rimfire, and I mean lots, but I still will stick with my 30-06 even if it was legal.

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Old February 21, 2010, 11:15 PM   #30
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James
I wasnt referring to anyone in particular, it just seems like people always start saying that stuff with the smaller guns. I love the 243 and my wife and daughters are deadly with it also.


Getting a little side tracked and talking about bears, there was a lady maybe 7-8 years ago that was in big trouble for killing a griz. About 25 miles away, the story we heard was some kinda bear was getting in her corral at night. She heard it out there and shot at it with a 22 to scare it. She wasnt far away of course, at the edge of the corral and it was dark out, but the next day in the light she found out it was a griz and she actually hit it in the head and killed it!
Game and fish did their investigation and if I remember right, since it had been chewing on her horses they let her go.
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Old February 22, 2010, 11:49 AM   #31
Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
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Please don't miss understand my point here folks, AND NO!!!! I am not advocating just shooting at "the Critter" rather then carefully picking your shot.

However, do to the mass/weight/energy factor, using a lighter rifle makes shot placement ever more important!

Lets face it, most of us can spin a yarn about so & so taking his critter year after year with with __________ rifle and how every shot is in the head/neck/???? and he never misses etc. etc. etc. etc.

Back in 1960, during my 17th year, my father died and times were very hard for mom and I.

Thanks to a friend's help we put a critter in the freezer and had meat on the table.

The critter was put down with a .22 to the head. One shot, dead critter.

However, two shots were taken and the next day I finally found the other doe, dead and wasted.

The point is, we can come up with books full of tales of kills made with "sub" calibers and how the rifle kills like lightning, ----- BUT!!!!! ---- all it takes is one mis-que and we now have a different story which includes a wounded animal.

I have a .243 and have take a number of deer with same, but I realize it IS NOT an elk rifle any more then a .22, 17, .22/250, 220swift is a deer rifle.

Therefore, since once we walk into the woods for a hunt the expermentation stage is over, the smart hunter will take a gun of reasonable caliber, shooting a quality bullet AND pick his/her shot.

Because, mistakes/poor shot placement does happen in real life, and I for one do not desire to add any more pages to the book telling about lost and wounded animals left to rot in the woods.

Save the testing for the range, be ethical/reasonable in choice of caliber and bullet, then carefully take that shot, because given enough hunts, you will make a poor one.

And that shooting friends, is when the larger caliber/bullet will pull your fat out of the fire!

Keep em coming!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot

Last edited by Crusty Deary Ol'Coot; February 22, 2010 at 07:28 PM.
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Old February 22, 2010, 06:52 PM   #32
James R. Burke
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Reloader28 thanks for the come back, I do respect your vast knowledge, and have learned alot from your replys. Jim
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Old February 22, 2010, 07:24 PM   #33
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Reloader, I--and maybe others--figure that as a generality the radius of destruction inside an animal is somewhat smaller with smaller projectiles. Seems so, generally, from "autopsies" of a bunch of deer. So, I work for a tad higher grade of precision with my .243 than with my '06. And, I limit the shots I take to somewhat shorter ranges as well as the angle at which Bambi is standing.

I figure most experienced hunters work at proper shot placement; folks with the smaller-cartridge rifles are just pickier about it.
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Old February 23, 2010, 09:26 AM   #34
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A .243 is an excellent caliber for deer. I've killed many with it. By the same token I've killed many with a 22LR and up. And yes, shot placement is critical with any caliber.

For me it's not just killing the deer. Most of my satisfaction comes from making the most perfect shot I can. Nothing is better to me than a well aimed and executed shot that drops deer in their tracks. Unfortunately this isn’t the case with all hunters. To many, the kill is the apex. The shot is just a means to an end.

To these hunters larger calibers equate to more killing power. This greater killing power effect instills the false notion that even a poorly placed shot will somehow lead to a clean kill, the zenith of their hunt. While a bad shot will kill deer, or any other game, it may take hours, days and miles before death. Many have learned that more killing power doesn’t necessarily mean easier kills. Sadly to say many more have not. In their exuberance to kill they forget the fundamentals. They break the chain necessary to accomplish the task at hand to a full and satisfying conclusion.
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Old February 23, 2010, 10:54 AM   #35
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I've defended the 243 many times so I'll just offer picture proof from now on. I'd stick with the heavier 243 bullets intended for deer in the 80 to 100 gr range. Which ever one your rifle groups well. But other than that it's all good.

.243, 159 yard shot, 100 gr Cor-lokt. Bullet exited the far side. Buck ran 30 yards after the shot.

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Old February 23, 2010, 03:30 PM   #36
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If you can afford them the Swift 90 grn Scirocco Bonded is one awesome projectile with a ballistic coefficient of .419, which is very high for this caliber.
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Old February 24, 2010, 08:54 PM   #37
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if its a factory load i go with the 75 gr hollow point from hornady. have killed many deer with them and have seen several other people using them and they have had no complaints. i like to shoot my 257 weatherby or a 300 win mag but i have to say that my 243 will kill just as well if the bullet is placed rite. its all in what ur gun likes because if ur gun wont shoot better than a 2 or 3 inch group with a bullet then obviously u better find sumin else cuz if it groups bad at 100 it will most likely get worse as it gets farther out there. play with different loads and pick out the one that groups the best in your rifle and stick with it
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Old February 24, 2010, 09:03 PM   #38
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Dozens of Whitetail Deer with a Ruger .243 Most with Remington Express Core-Lokt 100 GR.

Not one has ran more than 50yds.

My uncle shoots a 22-250. He has shot several studs with it and claims its due to its shootability. Meaning, He can shoot it offhand or at odd angles from a climber. He doesnt have to worry about the recoil. I agree. I like my .243 for the same reason. I dont jump the trigger so I dont miss. (I have missed 2 deer over my lifetime. Both were when I was younger and before I joined the army and learned to shoot well.)
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Old February 25, 2010, 08:48 AM   #39
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I hear some of you talking about wounded animals because of small calibers but I have personally been on searches for deer that others have shot here in Maine that were hit with a 300 WM, 30-06, 308, 30-30, 270 and these deer went for Miles. It all comes down to where the hit was. You can use a .22 Magnum here but I wouldn't. I have also seen deer torn to shreds by over kill in Caliber. I guess it all comes down to what you are comfortable with. A Man in WV takes over a 100 deer in his life, all with a 22-250, and 99 percent of the time he drops them in their tracks. A guy in Maine takes 2 deer with a 338 and all of a sudden thats the best deer gun. I do know that a double lung shot will result in a kill but you still have to find them. I've seen people give up looking because they didn't see the deer with 50 yards of where they hit it. Once you hit it, keeps your eyes on it. I never dreamed this post would generate this much talk but it's good. Good Hunting
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Old February 25, 2010, 09:01 AM   #40
skydiver3346
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.243 for deer?

Lots of whitetails have been taken over the years with the .243 Remington.
I personally would rather use my 6.5x55 for deer but no matter what you hunt with, (shot placement is king).
A 300 Win mag doesn't guarantee a sure kill unless you hit it in the right areas. Bottome line, I would use a 100 grain bullet if hunting a .243 (Remington Core-Lokts are perfect). My wife uses a Remington 6mm for deer hunting (similar to .243) and she has taken untold numbers of deer with it over the last 20 years.
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Old February 28, 2010, 07:03 AM   #41
David Turley
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the 243 is to small for deer sized game ive heard people say if you hit them in the right place they will drop them everytime but the same could be said for the 22lr
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Old February 28, 2010, 09:03 AM   #42
nate45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydiver3346
Lots of whitetails have been taken over the years with the .243 Remington.
I'm not trying to be overly picky about correct nomenclature. Also I'm not ridiculing you for not knowing the correct name of this cartridge. You may very well know and just accidentally wrote the wrong thing. I and many others have done the same thing.

The correct name is .243 Winchester, Remington does have a .243 caliber cartridge, it is called the 6 mm Remington.

Again you may already know this, I'm not saying you don't. The reason I pointed it out, is because lots of people who don't know the correct names of cartridges come here seeking information.

To the OP: In general .243 caliber bullets of 90-100 grains are usually structured for deer size game.
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Old March 4, 2010, 07:29 PM   #43
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Don't even think about a V-Max. They're varmint bullets. Varmint bullets are designed to expand rapidly upon impact with little penetration. Deer sized game requires controlled penetration while the bullet expands. Think 85 grains and up.
My .243 is partial to Speer 105 grain SP's. Does astounding things to a ground hog too.
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Old March 5, 2010, 09:33 AM   #44
Art Eatman
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Back about forty years a go, a dozen of us leased a 7,000-acre ranch near Uvalde. We had the place for six or eight years, thereabouts. I hunted with a .243 about half the time; the rest was with my '06. I probably killed on a 50/50 basis by usage.

One day the rancher came up to me as I was skinning a buck and in the course of casual conversation said, "You must be a better shot than most of the guys." I kinda shrugged and asked, "How so?" He commented, "Well, you shoot 'em in the neck, mostly." So I just shrugged again; didn't really know what to say. I knew I couldn't match my father's skill, and a couple of the other guys were good shots. But I never brought any in which had been hit "a little far back".

I've mentioned numerous times that I use the Sierra 85-grain HPBT. That's not the best deer bullet there is. But I already know that. I'm not covered all over with stupid. It's not a good bullet for an angling shot. But it's the hammer of death on a neck shot, and I never had a deer go anywhere after a cross-body heart shot.

That rig worked good on my culling program for about four years on the old family ranch, for some twenty or so excess deer.

So when I see comments about the .243 as not being big enough, I just figure that we still have folks who don't know what they're talking about. More mouth than experience. When I see folks bumrap the cartridge for problems with a wounded deer, they're blaming the cartridge instead of the user. Sorta like blaming a handgun for causing robberies, seems to me.

It wouldn't be my go-to gun for elk, though.
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Old March 5, 2010, 10:08 AM   #45
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Well put ART.
I'm not so good with words. Thats what usually gets me into trouble on here.
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Old March 5, 2010, 02:30 PM   #46
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Quote:
90-100 grain controlled expansion. Cor-lokt is perfect.
This. My kids who hunt all took their first deer with factory loaded 100 grain Cor-Lokts. All DRT.
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Old March 6, 2010, 07:44 PM   #47
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The Core-lokt Remmys are great factory loads and work well for deer. I have seen many mule deer taken with the .243 and 100 gr. Core-lokt even out to 300 yards. Shot placement is prettty important with the smaller calibers, but the 6mm's are by no means too small for even the biggest of the mulies or whitetails.

If you desire to go with a very good premium bullet, the Nosler Partitions and the Barnes TSX are difficult to beat. They will extend your effective range by a few yards but you have to ask if the additional cost is worth it. I personally love the 85gr TSX in my 6mm Rem. They do require a 1:10 or faster twist rate to stabilize, and take some tweaking to dial in an accurate load, but once you do, they take no hostages.
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Old March 8, 2010, 08:17 AM   #48
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I have finally chosen the Remington .243 - 90 grain Swift Scirocco Bonded. The Ballistics are Great. I'll let you know about my results this fall.
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Old March 8, 2010, 12:45 PM   #49
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I've loaded 95gr partitions in my 6mm and love em. I really want to try the 85gr tipped triple shok, but now that I moved to the midwest where I can't deer hunt with it I guess I'll have to wait a little to try it.
Stickman, you mind posting your load and overall length for your load? I know the tsx is supposed to be loaded out farther.
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Old March 8, 2010, 11:28 PM   #50
reloader28
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tyrajam...

Why cant you hunt deer with it? To small a gun or the bullet? I thought 6mm / 243 was legal everywhere.
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