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Old January 15, 2010, 10:22 AM   #51
Zhe Wiz
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Not really, most deer I have shot was no farther than 50 yards out. Good ground blind or driven most of my shots have been that close. I do have a weatherby 30-06 too but prefer the shotgun, hunt birds take a slug or two along and bag a deer same day. I have done just that in the past.
I get the bird thing...though I don't hunt birds... The rest? I don't get it. It's not like a rifle doesn't work at under 50 yards! And nearly all rifles are more pleasant to shoot than a shotgun...and more accurate too. I guess I'm odd or something, but a rifle seems like a much better tool for deer. You have the short range covered, the long range covered, less recoil, cheaper bullets, more accurate - what's not to love? If I had a choice between my 7mm-08 and a shotgun, I'd take the 7-08. No contest really. Unfortunately the counties in which I typically hunt are shotgun/muzzleloader only.

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Old January 16, 2010, 02:51 PM   #52
Dave McC
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While I have used rifles, and may again.....

Under typical Eastern conditions a decent slug shotgun is not a handicap.

Shot opps over 50 yards are the exception, not the rule. And while I eye askance ANY claims of brush bucking abilities, the big lead chunks shotguns throw MAY be slightly less subject to deflecting on a twig, leaf or shadow.

Slugs, even from the 20 gauge, provide plenty of power and penetration.

The 20 gauge Rottweil is quite effective, right up there with the 12s.

The other 20s,used at reasonable range, make nice short blood trails when properly inserted.

And unlike,say, 25-06s, the meat is edible right up to the hole.
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Old January 24, 2010, 11:51 PM   #53
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Born and raised in Illinois, Marlin Model 512 Slugmaster,(clip-fed bolt-action)1"in 28" twist shooting Lightfield 1-1/4 oz sabots.Absolutely hammers both deer & shooter.
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Old January 25, 2010, 09:00 AM   #54
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Things come full circle. In the days before smokeless powder, British hunters going into places like the African plains used "bore rifles" to hunt big dangerous game. These guns looked like heavy built double barrel shotguns with express rifle sights. The bores were often rifled but sometimes smooth to allow use of shot shells. They fired a hard cast lead round ball. Very destructive on the large beast. A "10-bore" would fire a 700 grain ball. (10 lead balls to the pound). Then smokeless powder came along and allowed longer range and lighter rifles.
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Old January 26, 2010, 02:52 AM   #55
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things have changed

Back in the day, when there were no "dedicated" slug guns, and shotguns wore beads, and not dots and Leupolds, the Foster slug, or heaven forbid the "punkin ball" (my Dad had a cigar box w/ a few in it), the shotgun was pretty limited in range due to the sights (or lack of). And so a shotgun was looked upon as a marginal deer getter. Who wanted to lug a 30 inch 12ga pump w/ a 50 yd range around all day when they could have a M94.

Now we've got special bbls, sights and slugs and the shotgun w/ slug seems a pretty effective deer getter, esp since most deer are killed inside 100 yds anyhow.

I am most curious about this 150-200 yd slug shooting and 8 inch group business. Not to hi-jack the thread, but how do you zero such a gun?

Are you simply measuring low groups at 200, but zeroing the gun on at 100? If so whats the drop?????

Or do you zero it x high at 100 to come on at 200? The velocity has got to be low, so the trajectory must be very arcing, ie lots of drop. A long range zero (200?) must result in a very high midrange trajectory, enough for plenty of misses if we count in shooter wobbbles.

How do you zero a .68 caliber rifle??????????????
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Old January 28, 2010, 11:21 AM   #56
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+1 to bamaranger I have the same questions plus one.

If slug guns are for shots 100yds or less, wouldn't peep sights be optimal?
That is about the range that they are used by a lot of the guys in the rifle part of this forum.

If not, what sights do you guys use?
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Old January 28, 2010, 07:26 PM   #57
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Peeps,Morg. Mine are an old Lyman 58 and a newer Williams. Both have the apertures removed, the original ghost ring.

They work well, almost as fast as a bead and much more precise.
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Old January 29, 2010, 01:48 PM   #58
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Is it beyond the rhelm of an average DIY'er to remove the bead and add rifle sights to the barrel (no ribs on the barrel)...or should this be left to a professional smith?
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Old January 29, 2010, 01:55 PM   #59
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In another thread people where talking about peeps sights and posted a website that has them for sale. So I assume that you can put them on yourself. They were talking about rifles though, so it might be different.
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Old January 29, 2010, 07:32 PM   #60
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Adding sights is more than just unscrewing a bead. You have to drill and tap the threads exactly inline on both the front and back of the barrel. Plus, you'd have to find the right height sights that match that barrel. Of course, all that assumes your bird barrel has enough meat in the wall thickness to handle screws. By the time you do that, you are better off buying a $75-$100 barrel from Gunbroker.
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Old January 31, 2010, 10:11 AM   #61
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Some require drill and tap, others soldering, or some clamp onto the gun without any gunsmithing. Mounting sights can be a good entry level gunsmithing project.
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Old February 1, 2010, 04:54 PM   #62
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a rifle seems like a much better tool for deer.
Iowa does have a rifle season now, lower 2 counties across the state late hunt anterless deer.

Been hunting since the 60s, a shotgun is a comfy feel. I am good with a rifle out to 300 yards, but never have I shot a deer that far away. Most were 50 yards or less.
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Old February 1, 2010, 06:11 PM   #63
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Been hunting since the 60s, a shotgun is a comfy feel. I am good with a rifle out to 300 yards, but never have I shot a deer that far away. Most were 50 yards or less.
That fact that you shoot deer at (typically) under 50 yards and feel comfy getting punched in the shoulder by your shotgun does not make a shotgun a better tool than a rifle for hunting deer. Rifles do just fine at under 50 yards, last time I checked, and they don't punch me in the shoulder, at least my 7-08 doesn't. If YOU are more comfortable with your shotgun than you are with your rifle, you should use the shotgun, of course. But my argument doesn't apply. I'm suggesting that if the hunter is equally practiced with both tools, the rifle is the better one. I have seen nothing in this thread to argue against that. Everyone just says "I shoot less than 50 yards so my shotgun is fine". Yes, it's fine, but is it better?

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Old February 1, 2010, 06:17 PM   #64
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I have not in a while. But 2X scope with an 11/87 at 100 yards from a tree stand. They fall right down, very quick.
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Old February 1, 2010, 11:08 PM   #65
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The rifle shoots a light weight bullet at high velocity, which creates alot of hydrostatic shock which ruins alot of meat around the bullet placement.
The shotgun shoots a heavy weight bullet at a low velocity, which does not create as much shock, which saves more meat. When using the shot gun for more than just deer, such as squirrel, rabbit, turkey, ect. its the same manual of arms also. I would guess more deer that are hit with a rifle round are lost vs getting hit with a slug.
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Old February 2, 2010, 11:48 AM   #66
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The rifle shoots a light weight bullet at high velocity, which creates alot of hydrostatic shock which ruins alot of meat around the bullet placement.
The shotgun shoots a heavy weight bullet at a low velocity, which does not create as much shock, which saves more meat.
Oh come on, you can do better than that! :-) Shot placement, shot placement, shot placement!! If you hit 'em where you should (in my opinion) hit 'em - in the ribs and thru the lungs, no meat is damaged regardless of rifle/shotgun choice. Not only that, but I would also argue that you're much more likely to hit them where you should if you're using a rifle instead of a shotgun. Greater accuracy of the "tool" added to less likelihood of a punch induced flinch equals better shot placement.

Now, there ARE occasions when the deer doesn't cooperate and you can't get a nice broadside shot. It's either quartering to or away, etc. In those cases (which aren't that common in my experience...you can almost always wait for a broadside shot) you are going to ruin some meat, so MAYBE you could argue that a shotgun will ruin less. I say it doesn't happen often and there's very little additional meat damage. Not enough to offset the advantages of a rifle.

As for your second argument - that you "guess" more rifle-hit deer are lost than shotgun hit deer - that's a very difficult theory to test. I would "guess" that at equal distances, more shotgun deer are lost than rifle deer are. Why? Reduced accuracy/poor shot placement.

Hunters are possibly more likely to take a longer shot with a rifle than with a shotgun and may very well overestimate their ability to successfully make such a shot. That overestimation would cause a poor shot at distance with a rifle, a shot that may not be taken at all with a shotgun. That, however, is not the "tool's" fault, at least not the tool we're discussing. It's the "other" tool at fault in that case - the hunter. :-)

OK, I've completely taken this thread in another direction. I'm sorry. This is an interesting (to me) discussion, however. I primarily hunt in shotgun only counties of NY state and have taken all but 2 deer with my shotgun. One was with a rifle and one with a muzzleloader. But I'm very much looking forward to those counties switching to allow rifles. When they do, I'm switching to my 7-08 as my gun of choice. It is bolt action and my shotgun is semi-auto (reduced recoil, of course!) so the shotgun has a slight edge there, but follow-up shots are rarely needed anyway.

I may change my mind after using the rifle for a while (if the option ever comes to pass,) but for now it seems to easily be the best tool in my gun cabinet.

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Old February 2, 2010, 04:56 PM   #67
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does not make a shotgun a better tool than a rifle for hunting deer.
It does for me. My 30-06 kicks too. A box of 20 at the range will be felt out of the rifle, the shotgun? Not so much.

Hey use what you want and feel comfy with. I prefer the shotgun.
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Old February 3, 2010, 04:47 PM   #68
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Will any 12ga slug be safe to fire from my fixed choke (modified choke) barrel? I've heard stories about people using chokes that were too tight and cracking their barrel.

I was specifically considering the Brenneke K.O. Slug, 2-3/4" Shell, 1 oz., 1600 fps
Seems that a lot of people say they get the most accurate results from this brand, and (for now, due to cost) I won't be buying a whole bunch of different brands to compare, but will in the future before doing any hunting w/ slugs.

Last edited by Uncle Ben; February 3, 2010 at 05:08 PM.
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Old February 3, 2010, 04:58 PM   #69
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Brennekke makes a good slug for smooth bores, the sabots wont work as well without a rifled barrel. Slugs are relatively cheap so you can get a couple boxes to try out at the range. Makes a diff on longer shots for accuracy.
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