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Old January 8, 2010, 02:20 PM   #1
colostomyclown
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How I Look after a Mossberg, esp. when new.

I posted this on THR, thought I'd put it on here. If you disagree with anything I say, by all means chime in. I've personally found this system to produce the best results on my Mossberg shotguns. It's shotgun specific because on the Mossberg you can completely strip the receiver and I suppose it could be applied to a 1300 Defender. anyhow, this method has kept my Mossbergs running beautifully (8-10 of them alone over the past year and a half-2 years) and used a barebones variety of it on my old Winchester Ranger 120 and NEF break barrel 20 for YEARS and YEARS of hard use without a single bit of rust or malfunction. I apply this method to any gun new or used that enters my possession, both on acquisition as well as after every 500 rounds or so, before long term storage and if any repairs/modifications need to be done. If storing the gun long term, I'd probably finish the process out using a moderate coat of EEZOX or Cosmoline if you can find it, and, if storing the weapon in a soft or hard shell case, storing it in a storage bag WITHIN the case (like an Aloksak) and/or using silica gel.


When I get the gun, I fieldstrip it. I even remove the extractor and screw and I open up the mag tube whether its a 590 or 500 or not. I put all of the internal parts (elevator, shell stop and interruptor, bolt, bolt slide, extractor, extractor screw, magazine follower and endcap if its a 590) in a pile on a towl or old sheet and spray them with CLP Powder Blast and then let them sit.

I then spray spray/apply 3-in-1 oil or any heavier oil, even Mobil-1 to the inside of the magazine tube liberally and let it coat the inside on it's own. attach a cleaning rod to a drill with a bore mop end and some old cloth or cleaning patches tied around the bore mop tightly so the thing will only insert into the magazine tube really firm, you may have to start the drill spinning to help guide it in. Don't mangle up the threads on the end, you'll know if it's TOO big to go in. It's important that it's tight like those so it exerts some friction on the inside of the tube in order to polish any crust on the inside. the Mossberg tubes usually come pretty dirty and gnarly except on the 590a1's, and even then they could use it. Move the drill through the tube, polishing back and forth in one slow, all the way forward and all the way back motion while the drill spins. You'll smell hot oil and the tube may even warm up due to the friction. This is good. You can't OVER polish so do a good job. I finish out by cleaning ALL residual oil out of the inside with Hoppes or Powder blast, then EXTREMELY lightly oil with CLP Breakfree. Wipe the spring off clean with a rag and set them both aside.

Now liberally cover the receiver inside and out with a heavier oil like 3-in-1 or or Mobil One. I like any heavy oil. Go decent but dont over do it. Rub it in with your fingers or a cloth so the surface is downright slippery. I then apply intense heat froma blowdryer or heat gun until the parts and receiver are red hot. I then wipe everything off extremely well with a cloth. I lightly oil everything with CLP breakfree and reassemble the receiver and mag tube. Now for the barrel.

I polish ALL my chambers the same way I do the mag tube. It's not as heavy duty as some other methods of polishing but I've never needed anything heavier, even on relatively "rough" 870 chambers. After I polish the chamber and to a certain extent the forcing cone, I spray the barrel with CLP Powder Blast and let it sit for about 10 minutes. I use only patches at first - a new gun, even if the barrel looks somewhat dirty, shouldn't require a brass brush. I only use a brush after moderate-heavy shooting (50 shells+). I run patches soaked with Hoppes Nitro or Hoppes no. 9 through until they start coming out cleaner. I then use a patch sprayed with CLP breakfree through until the barrel looks shiny and relatively dry. Voila.

After putting about 500 rounds through it or when ready to store long term, I repeat the process, or as needed. At that point, you may want to further tweak and polish/deburr parts and/or the bolt, but that's up to speculation and something not really needed to be worried about now.

In closing, products I DO recommend for maintenance/cleaningprotection :

CLP Breakfree and CLP Powder Blast (smells ok, cleans great and protects serviceably but Powder Blast does leave a slight residue)
Hoppes Nitro Solvent (smells good, cleans better)
Hoppes no. 9 (the old standby, works everytime, strong smell but it's like an old friend now)
Eezox or Cosmoline
Mobil-1, Castrol, any heavy oil, motor or otherwise but only used in the manner prescribed. Not for use as an action oil or barrel lube.

Products I definitely DO NOT :

Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber. Hands down THE worst product I've ever used. Leaves a massive white residue on nearly every surface and is unbelievably weak as a cleaner. I literally thought it was making my gun dirtier as my gun was cleaning as slow and arduous as a Mosin Nagant with it. I honestly may as well have used water. Avoid.

Remoil. Not a fan of the product you get for the name brand price. It does it's job but it stinks, and every bottle seems underfilled and runs out of pressure faster than it runs out of liquid.

Last edited by colostomyclown; January 8, 2010 at 02:37 PM.
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Old January 8, 2010, 02:38 PM   #2
hogdogs
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Quote:
heavier oil like 3-in-1 or or Mobil One
What weight of Mobil one?
3-in-one is like a 5 weight at most. Mobil one is 5W30 or such.
Both are completely different animals as far as weight goes. The former is "sewing machine" or "light" oil and the latter is motor oil.

In motor oil the first number is "how it flows cold" the second is "it protects like..."

Brent
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Old January 8, 2010, 03:09 PM   #3
colostomyclown
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usually its any somewhat vicous oil like 3-in-1 on up to heavy motor oil, usually like you said 5w30. I just wing it when it comes to that because I try have it absorb in, which it does to a point. After it's red hot, wearing gloves I rub it in and off THOROUGHLY. I leave none of that oil out. I "function" oil with breakfree. I view the sop or motor stuff as a shild that's ususlly good for a week or two in as humid of conditions as I've had it. You're in Florida...you may need a little more haha. So it's more part of the surface than anything. One thing I don't use is WD UNLESS it's the only thing because I believe it was you that said it had a tendency to kill primers. Plus there's so many gun specific similar things, like the break free that are better.

Last edited by colostomyclown; January 8, 2010 at 03:16 PM.
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Old January 8, 2010, 03:29 PM   #4
JerseyDrez
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You could summarize that whole book and just say 'I clean my shotgun thoroughly' you know

Haha. Its obvious your a perfectionist. You have a few good tips though, so thanks for sharing.
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Old January 8, 2010, 04:29 PM   #5
colostomyclown
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haha probably. however I think the average gun owner doesnt use the oil/heat method on their guns and it really does them a disservice unless they want to look after them more often. plus I think failing to give attention to the inside of the mag tube can lead to some troubles later. my guns just FEEL better with a smooth tube. Yes, the ordeal's a hassle, but it keeps even my blued guns pretty attention-free in some pretty bad conditions for at least a couple weeks at a time. a terribly humid climate like FL, LA, other coastal states may need a little extra protection in the form of a silicone treated gun sock or an airtight storage bag with some desiccant inside, but beyond the general method there isn't a whole you can do besides have your gun finished in some ultra high tech super duper setup like Robar NP3.


there's been a few threads here and over there on how to keep a shotgun rust free and or general maintenance, so I thought it could go up. thanks for the input, as always.
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Old January 8, 2010, 05:42 PM   #6
Big Bill
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Why such an elaborate ritual? I'd never do all that in a million years. IMO, it's totally unnecessary. I've owned guns for 50 years that have never rusted or malfunctioned. All without going to the trouble that you do. Simple cleaning and lubricating as the owner's manual suggests is enough.

PS When do you find the time to shoot your guns?
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Old January 8, 2010, 06:53 PM   #7
colostomyclown
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Find the time? It takes like a half hour to do this and it makes for a better firearm in my opinion. I'm glad you don't have rust. Wonderful. You wouldn't believe how many of my friends have encountered both rust AND pitting on a shotgun by just going through the motions. Granted, they weren't GREAT to the firearms as I am, but they weren't terrible to them either. Also take into consideration all factors. Do you have a gunsafe? I don't. Does the temperature fluctuate in your house? Mine does. Do you ever store the weapon in a trunk, behind a seat or in a garage, in all seasons? I frequently do. All these circumstances and more become magnified three times over if you live in a humid climate and/or use the weapon in a duty capacity (which I do not), so you need all of the help you can get. The gun is an investment that I intend to have in working order until it is passed down. It's a bigger ordeal than just running a swab through the barrel and lightly cleaning and lubing the action, yes, but I am very satisfied with the results.

I've performed this on a blued gun I had stored in a foam lined case (notorious for trapping moisture) in one of the most humid areas of my house (next to a room with a shower) prior to letting it sit for around 6 months, and it was shiny and nice when I pulled it out. Bright shiny bore, No rust, no pitting, beading, etc....I do not recommend storing guns this way but I didn't know any better at this time, and I believed the method helped a bunch. The foam cases can be detrimental FOR SURE in the long term. I can store my Sig in one for only a week or two and pull it out and notice oil beading and fogging all over the gun. This is not from over lubrication as I am pretty moderate with that and throughly wipe all firearms after cleaning.

Last edited by colostomyclown; January 8, 2010 at 07:06 PM.
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Old January 8, 2010, 08:00 PM   #8
troy_mclure
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my mossy 500 protection plan.

buy used 500, spray wd 40 in receiver/barrel, use for 3 seasons, re-spray after last duck season.
stick in closet till squirrel season. repeat for 10years.

of course i now clean my guns after every range session, but thats what i did while young.
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Old January 8, 2010, 08:20 PM   #9
colostomyclown
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worst case scenario, a durable gun like the Mossberg would be okay with that. A blued gun would *probably* still rust somewhat, but who knows.
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