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Old January 2, 2010, 04:21 PM   #1
steve1147
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Join Date: December 5, 2009
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NEW/OLD Rifle, any help in ID'ing this???

Hi Guys,
Just came across this relic. I've found some info on it on the web, but I'm sure I can get better info here. On the receiver it's stamped "MIDA BRESCIA", also a big "18", and "L 1296". Also the letters "RP" in a small oval in several places.
The stock has an inked(?) old oval with a tail on it that's unreadable, and DEEP grooved lettters/numbers that to the best of my ability say "2L8, then 1890", but it's hard to make out, could be about anything.
http://www.dostplumbing.com/1_1.jpg
http://www.dostplumbing.com/1_2.jpg
http://www.dostplumbing.com/1_3.jpg
http://www.dostplumbing.com/1_4.jpg
Anyway, is this worth keeping or selling? What would this thing bring to a collector if anything?
I'm mostly into handguns so any info you can provide would be appreciated!
Thanks! Steve W.
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Old January 2, 2010, 04:35 PM   #2
Buzzcook
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Italian Carcano M91 or a variant of it. If it's in good shape and you can get the ammo, keep it. They are pretty good shooters.
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Old January 2, 2010, 06:49 PM   #3
Gator_Weiss
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You have an infantry grade, Manlicher-Carcano Rifle.

This rifle was manufactured in the town of Brescia, Italy, circa 1926, under license from the Austrian firm of Mannlicher.

You will probably find some Roman numerals on it, that will indicate the year of "reign" of Mussolini, in which it was manufactured, unless it was manufactured prior to his ascension.

The rifles came in 6.5 Carcano, and 7.35 Carcano. There were two or three carbine variants, and to my knowledge, only one infantry variant was produced - that being the longer rifle that you have.

I am going to hazard a guess and say that yours is probably 7.35. It would well be a 6.5, but I am guessing that the infantry model was in the larger caliber.

Of interest to you might be the fact that the rifling in the Carcano becomes progressively "steeper" as it nears the end of the barrel. The rate of twist increases, the farther the bullet travels down the barrel. This is unusual, and it was one of the traits of these rifles that made them somewhat unique.

Many people **** on the Carcano, and I dont know why. I have had a few Carcanos over the years, and I have found every one of those to have been solid rifles that threw good accuracy on the range.

The rifle utilizes a "clip" of five rounds that is not a stripper clip. Carcano clips are loaded in the top of the rifle, and you eject them out of the bottom of the rifle by pushing the button inside of the trigger guard. Yours might have an old clip remaining in the rifle. If not, you can find some here and there on the net or occasionally at a gunshow.

The safety is an unusual affair. You can actually decock the rifle using the safety catch. The safety can be employed silently. I dont know if it was designed that way, but it sure engages silently when you need it to.

The carbine model in 6.5 Carcano was used to assasinate President Kennedy, in Dallas.

Your rifle is probably worth between 225.00 to 550.00 depending on condition and caliber, proof marks being intact, whether or not it has been altered, etc, etc. Yours looks very good. Clean it up well, and dont refinish the stock. Leave it as it is to protect the value.

I was recently handed one - in December 2009 - that was owned by a young police officer who asked me to identify the weapon for him. His "Uncle" captured the weapon from an operative of the NVA in Vietnam who attempted to take someone prisoner by pointing the weapon at them. His "Uncle" reached over and took the weapon away and took the operative prisoner instead. He brought the rifle home with him. His appeared to have been shortened in the stock, but it had a long barrel. Maybe it was an infantry model that was shortened by someone in Vietnam. The caliber of his was 7.35. It seemed unusual to encounter a pre WW2 Italian rifle in Vietnam. But I have heard of some of the Montangards being found with Mauser rifles up in the highlands. My cousing was an adviser in Vietnam, and from what I learned there must have been a real variety of weapons in Vietnam. There were many weapons brought there by the French and some by the Japanese as well.

Last edited by Gator_Weiss; January 2, 2010 at 06:59 PM.
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Old January 2, 2010, 06:54 PM   #4
tater134
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As stated its a model 1891 Italian Carcano. The "18" stamp would indicate that it was made in 1918.I have one just like it and its a great shooter.As to whether or not to keep it or sell it that depends on what your interested in and if you reload or have access to ammo.Btw the Carcano uses an enbloc clip so youll need one to fire it unless you single load it (I wouldnt recommend this as it is hard on the extractor).

One other thing.Many of these rifles were refurbished after WW1 and they will have a star stamp on the tang where the bolt rides.Remove the bolt and check to see if the stamp is there.If not then it means your rifle hasnt been rebuilt and is worth more to many collectors.
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Old January 2, 2010, 07:00 PM   #5
tater134
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Gator_Weiss beat to posting but your post has several errors.

Quote:
This rifle was manufactured in the town of Brescia, Italy, circa 1926, under license from the Austrian firm of Mannlicher.
Im not sure where youre getting the date from but the "18" stamped on the barrel would indicate the date of manufacture.

Quote:
The rifles came in 6.5 Carcano, and 7.35 Carcano. There were two or three carbine variants, and to my knowledge, only one infantry variant was produced - that being the longer rifle that you have.

I am going to hazard a guess and say that yours is probably 7.35. It would well be a 6.5, but I am guessing that the infantry model was in the larger caliber.
The 7.35 caliber change came about between the world wars and no long rifles were manufactured in it to the best of my knowledge.All M91s will be in 6.5 caliber.

Quote:
The rifle utilizes a "clip" of five rounds that is not a stripper clip.
The Carcano clips are 6 rounders.

Quote:
Your rifle is probably worth between 225.00 to 550.00 depending on condition and caliber.
I would say that estimate is a bit high.Refurbished long rifles seem to be in the $150-300 range depending on condition with non refurbs selling for a bit more.

Not trying to nitpick or anything just wanted to get everything straight.
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Old January 2, 2010, 07:12 PM   #6
Gator_Weiss
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Tater, thanks......your information is undoubtedly correct.

Tater, thanks......your information is undoubtedly correct. I have only one of these rifles left, and have not fired it in over ten years.

Did he not say that his rifle was actually dated 1926? Could that be the date that it was refurbished? I have no doubt about your manufacture date, as you certainly seem to have some very detailed information on these rifles.

I liked the Carcano rifles. Many people seem to say derogatory things about the Carcanos. I never had a bad experience with any of mine. They worked well. They were easy to take care of. From what I was told in Germany by some of the oldsters in the shooting club I was involved with there, the Italian troopers really liked and appreciated the rifles.

In pricing, I have not seen a Carcano rifle around here for under 200 bucks in a long, long, time. Some of them in cut up condition are going for that.
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Old January 2, 2010, 07:21 PM   #7
tater134
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Quote:
Did he not say that his rifle was actually dated 1926? Could that be the date that it was refurbished?
I didnt see anything in his post referring to it???

Quote:
I liked the Carcano rifles. Many people seem to say derogatory things about the Carcanos. I never had a bad experience with any of mine. They worked well. They were easy to take care of. From what I was told in Germany by some of the oldsters in the shooting club I was involved with there, the Italian troopers really liked and appreciated the rifles.
I agree with you 100% I think alot of the bad reputation comes from people shooting long rifles that have had the barrels cut and the gain twist removed or shooting really worn out examples.

Quote:
In pricing, I have not seen a Carcano rifle around here for under 200 bucks in a long, long, time. Some of them in cut up condition are going for that.
That must just be the case in your area then.Where Im at unaltered ones are between $150-250 depending on the model and condition.The internet auction prices seem to be pretty high as of late though.Carcano prices have really gone up over the past 2 years.
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