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Old January 11, 2010, 02:23 AM   #1
hemiguy
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Holster Types

Ok, I figure I'll try this one time time, lol.

No extra rambo stuff...

I am actually getting quite overwhelmed with the varying styles and times of holsters.

I am going to be carrying a Glock G22, but I see the only 2 companies I've narrowed it down to is defiantly going to be Galco (just because everyone else seems to be comfortable with them - plus they have a holster that works with the tatical glock light) and Bianchi because they seem to have a very open stance on Glock products.

Originally I was thinking of using a holster with a slider strap like a LE holster just because it makes sense.. just like a cop you don;t want someone spotting your weapon and taking an easy grap at it, but then again is it really that big of a security stopper? I was looking at Bianchi's Piranah 77 holster


It also has a 3 hole system for standard conceal and tatical competition angle.

There is a downside I guess to having that extra security slider strap, if you needed immediate access to a car jacking or if some one grabs you from behind the last thing I want to REMEMBER to do is to have to undo that strap, not just whip it out...

Galco has two decent ones
THe M4X Matrix Auto Locking holster which is actually under $40


Then they have the "combat master" I know the pic isnt the glock but they have an option for it.



THen the big question is, the glcock tatical light.. I have a Crimson Trace laser grip, so the GTL10 or GTL11 would work for me, dimable or non dimable.
Galco and Glock are the only ones that I see that make holsters for GLocks with the tactical light.

The Galco W/ Tatical light actually looks pretty clean


THey call it the halo, lol.

What is everyone's opinion on the light? srtap and different holsters. is there something I am missing? Maybe another brand to suggest? The crossbreed holsters just look tooooooo uncomfy and a dead give away.

Sorry for my spelling, I tired...
Thanks again,
-The Big Loubowski
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Old January 11, 2010, 02:36 AM   #2
Frank Ettin
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The ugly truth about holsters is that IME they are as personal as a pair of shoes. What works for me may not work for you, and the only way to tell what really works for you is to try it. That's why a lot of us have the proverbial "Box-o-Holsters."

Some random thoughts:

[1] I prefer an open top holster. But I've experimented with straps, and, if everything is a good fit and the straps are well designed, they really won't slow you down -- as long as you practice. It's pretty easy to learn to break the strap with your thumb as you assume your full firing grip in the holster.

[2] IME, Galco makes a good product. I don't have any experience with Bianchi products.

[3] The light needs to be up to you.

[3]
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Old January 11, 2010, 02:59 AM   #3
Jim March
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I've been making my own holsters of late, with some of my most recent for two very different guns shown at:

http://www.thehighroad.us/showthread.php?t=415375 (scroll further down for the setup for a friend's Ruger 9mm autoloader).

Holsters can be classified as "low and loose" or "high and tight" or any combination in between. A tactical thigh rig would be what I'd call "low and tight". Most authenting western period stuff is "low and loose" with a few glaring exceptions (Wild Bill Hickok for starters).

I like "high and tight" for anything "outside waist band" ("OWB"). This lets you conceal with a shorter jacket, and in some cases helps with weapons retention. In crossdraw as I've started to focus on, I've gone so high I can casually rest my elbow on the gun's butt, locking it in hard with my left arm yet not look threatening at all. In case of a grab attempt, my right hand is totally free and I keep a good Spyderco 4" folding knife in my back right pocket I can get to quickly.

I think crossdraw has been under-rated because too many of the rigs are too low-slung. The advantages are interesting: fully ambidextrous gun access, fast access and strong retention.

When I started to build holsters that went THIS high, I found that strongside started to fall apart. It was just too high for that role. It would work only if I did an extreme forward cant and then ran it behind my hip, but then if I'm open carrying weapons retention is a really bad joke. But going this high and crossdraw, it all fell into place.

When I say "high", notice how on the wheelgun the whole cylinder is above the belt - and on the autoloader, the whole triggerguard is above the belt. That's pretty damn high. I've seen a few holsters that almost match it for similar size guns, but still...this is getting extreme.

Nobody else I'm aware of is doing this "belt grab" type of strap arrangement. That's the secret.

Other stuff: I don't like thumb-break snap-straps on any holster used with DA triggers. Too easy for the strap itself to get into the triggerguard on re-holstering and send a round skimming down the outer edge of your leg. Thankfully such accidents don't tend to be "too bad" as far as gunshot wounds go but...why go there?

You might note that my rig for my SA revolver doesn't cover the triggerguard at all. That's because as long as the hammer is down, pressure on the trigger won't do squat. The two other rigs I've made this way are both for DA guns owned by friends, a sweet little 3" S&W 66-3 and the Ruger DA/SA 9mm shown in that thread. Both of those rigs cover the triggerguard.
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Old January 11, 2010, 04:23 AM   #4
KenpoTex
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Any of those should be ok...I personally prefer an open-topped IWB (inside waistband) for day-to-day concealment, but to each his own. The thumb-break won't give you any problems if you train to use it. If you buy one with a thumb-break or other retention device, just make sure you engage it EVERY TIME you holster the weapon. Don't cheat yourself by leaving it disengaged when you practice (dry-fire, range, whatever) or you will create a problem.

One thing I would advise is to buy a holster with belt-loops that exactly fit your belt. In other words, don't buy a holster with 1 3/4" loops if your belt is only 1 1/4" or 1 1/2" wide (basically, avoid the "one size fits all" loops). Loops that fit your belt will make the holster more stable since the holster can't "rock" back and forth.
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Old January 11, 2010, 09:32 AM   #5
The Great Mahoo
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The retention strap can be nice, or it can be a pain. Personally, I don't care for them on my daily conceal rig; the normal retention of the mouth is good on most well-fit holsters, especially with IWB. Retention straps are nice, however, if you find yourself jogging up/down steps or making bending over a lot. For typical day to day use, I have never found it to be an issue not having the strap.

For holster style, there are many shapes and sizes, made to accomodate many different preferences. I prefer small holsters, using Slides for the most part for my OWB carry. These are just short holsters which secure the gun around the trigger guard and chamber, having an open bottom through which the barrel hangs down. This allows guns of various lengths (provided they are similar guns) to be used in the same holster, doesn't hand any lower than it needs to (no extra material to stick out) and lets the holster be easily hidden if empty (when going where a gun is prohibited, but I don't want to take the time to remove the holster.)
I am also a fan of IWB carry, especially tuckable holsters to allow me to conceal in most any mode of dress.

As for Galco and Bianchi, they both make excellent products, and best of all, are readily available for most guns. I actually was looking through their product lines the other day, and noticed their prices have really gone up from what I remember buying my last one at. For about the same price, or a bit more, you can get a custom fit holster from one of many great places. I have a tuckable IWB from K&D leather that is among the nicest I have ever used, and have been debating on a second for a new gun. If you want to look into some other dealers, I'm sure many of us can make some suggestions. Keep in mind, going this route usually means a long wait (3 weeks to 6 months) where as Galco/Bianchi are usually stocked items easily had within a few days.
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Old January 11, 2010, 09:48 AM   #6
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Can't add much more than was already said but I will throw my two cents into the mix.

Retention strap holsters are great if you are doing a lot of physical stuff in the course of your day to day routine such as running or jogging or open carry. Otherwise, they are a pain for concealed carry. It makes it more difficult to get to your gun as now you have to remove your cover (clothing) and then find the snap.

Like everyone else, I have a gazillion holsters in my collection. What I've learned is that for overall appearance, practicability, and comfort, Galco has it covered, unless you want to spring for really big bucks and get a custom jobbie. I have more Glaco stuff than the others, which quickly find their way to the bottom of the holster pile.

And as someone else mentioned, holster shopping is like buying shoes, it is a matter of personal taste and comfort. Good Luck.
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Old January 11, 2010, 11:26 AM   #7
hemiguy
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I am starting to see more and more where the shoe line fits into the equation. I am a pretty relaxed dude when it comes to options and such. Bottom line I just want something that works...

That Galco autolock G4 looks a lot like a tactical glock plastic holster instead of leather. YOu think that would be uncomfy? Its $34 too..

I seriously don't see any glock holsters with the exception of that "combat master" that is top slider open (no strap). Other than the K&D and make your own, is there any other brands to suggest?

Thank-you for your knowledge.
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Old January 11, 2010, 12:03 PM   #8
hemiguy
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I seemed to found more holsters!

Safariland has a cheap holster that has no strap...

under $60.. they call it the "FBI conceal hoslter" lol
Actually looks like a very nice holster...



THere is a "Sky Cop" holster that appears to me a tactical bases strap holster, looks middle of the road between complicated and comfy, its under $70



Then there is a no name Dual slot "pancake" holster for $55 that looks decent



I got a lot to think about these holsters are at a place called.. http://www.glockstore.com
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Old January 11, 2010, 12:10 PM   #9
ATW525
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Quote:
I seriously don't see any glock holsters with the exception of that "combat master" that is top slider open (no strap).
There are tons of Glock Holsters without a strap. Here's a small selection of other "Off the Rack" models. There are also countless custom leather makers that make open top holsters, and almost all of them make holsters for Glocks.

Desantis Speed Scabbard

Desantis Mini-Slide

Desantis Mini-Scabbard

Don Hume Agent 3 Slot

Don Hume H710

Don Hume H721 OT
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Old January 11, 2010, 01:01 PM   #10
The Great Mahoo
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I'd start by deciding what method of carry you want to try. Stong-side, cross-draw, shoulder, ankle, etc. Then there is IWB (Inside the waistband) vs OWB (oustide WB) to decide between.

In addition to a good holster, be sure to get a good, sturdy belt! Much of the comfort and dependability of a good holster is lost with a belt that folds over and flops away with the weight of the gun on it.



Personally, I prefer strong-side carry, and flip between IWB and OWB depending on dress.

As for holsters and makers, I have a ton of great links on my home PC, but don't know them to cite them from work. From my memory, though

I use a Don Hume JIT Slide for OWB carry of my Glock 36. They seem to have some other designs that look great, and they are all stocked-items and readily available.

For IWB carry of my Glock, I use a Dakota Defender from K&D, though it has since been replaced with the Thunderbird, which converts to an OWB as well. I've been considering ordering another for my new Sp101. I also have on of their belts, with which I am very happy. I believe it took about 3-4 months to get my order last time around.

Originally purchased for my .357 snubbie, my tuckable-IWb holster from http://www.highnoonholsters.com/ luckily fits my Sp101 and is still in use. High Noon's holsters are plain (atleast their stocked-items) but serve their funtion well. They are rather limited in models and sizes of guns they will support, though, but you should be fine. They do custom orders if you want something a bit nicer and don't mind waiting.

My OBW holster for my revolver, again originally used for my .356 but now used on my Sp101, is a Bianchi slide-stlye. The online store I bought them from stocks Galco and Bianchi, but the name escapes me at the moment, so I will have to get back on that one. Its a great holster, though, for a great price (~$30 IIRC) and probably has seen the most use of all of my gear.
Edit: The place I bought it from is Packin Heat. I knew it would come to me sooner or later. /edit.

Lastly, I have recently come across http://www.dmbullardleather.com/ and have been intrigued. I'm considering one of their BodyGuard style holster for my Sp101, since it's 3" barrell hangs a little lower than I would like in my current Bianchi slide. If anyone has any comments on this maker, I would be very much interested, but will likely be making a purchase in the next few weeks to try them out. Order make-time is quoted at about 8 weeks at the moment.


Oh, and don't forget about mag/ammo holders! If carrying an auto, you want to make sure you have a spare mag, not for capacity issues, but because most of any problems result from magazine failure. Not wanting to carry an extra magazine is why I usually carry my revolver instead. The above all have magazine carriers available in various styles.
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Last edited by The Great Mahoo; January 11, 2010 at 01:06 PM.
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Old January 11, 2010, 09:52 PM   #11
wally626
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I have a Glock 22 and started out with a Blackhawk Serpa II OWB holster, I liked as a holster but it was not good for concealed carry for me, the Glock 22 is a big gun and my waist is low, so getting even coats to cover the bottom of the gun was difficult. So I bought a IWB from Bull Dog Leather http://www.bulldogleathercompany.com/home Once I got the belt straps stretched a tad to handle my Beltman Belt it is working very well. If you are wearing suit coats and the like an OWB works fine, but for me I needed the extra coverage from IWB.
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Old January 11, 2010, 10:17 PM   #12
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Have you looked into the BlackHawk models? Their line of kydex holsters is pretty good but I carry my M&P in the BlackHawk "Serpa". it is an open top with a lock on it. the lock it disengaged with your trigger finger as you slide it up the holster when drawing your weapon. give it a look, can't hurt
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Old January 12, 2010, 12:28 AM   #13
Jim March
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The Serpa can in fact hurt you and there have been major criticisms of it among firearms trainers. See also:

http://www.rangemaster.com/newslette...Newsletter.pdf

http://www.thehighroad.org/archive/i.../t-164512.html
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Old January 12, 2010, 08:23 AM   #14
The Great Mahoo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Papa_timmy13
Have you looked into the BlackHawk models? Their line of kydex holsters is pretty good but I carry my M&P in the BlackHawk "Serpa". it is an open top with a lock on it. the lock it disengaged with your trigger finger as you slide it up the holster when drawing your weapon. give it a look, can't hurt
Blackhawk does make some fine gear. I don't care much for the Serpa, as Jim has mentioned it has drawn some criticism. The retention on it is great, but one must be very concious of how they disenage the lock, lest they find their "booger hook on the bangstick" possibly resulting in un-intentional discharges. If you can train to push w/o bending the finger joints, you come up with your finger along the frame, but it takes rigorous training to make sure you can do this under stress.

Bottom line, though, I just prefer leather over plastic holsters.
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Old January 12, 2010, 12:25 PM   #15
Jim March
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Right, but no amount of training will protect against a grain of sand or gravel under the switch locking it up tighter than Ron Paul's finances.
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