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Old December 11, 2009, 09:12 PM   #1
MeatAxe223
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Teaching kids to shoot

I've been taking my three boys to the range and shooting a variety of weopons with much success. My youngest is 10 years old and obviously smaller than the typical adult male frame most rifles are designed around. Even though he has no issues with accuracy I am concerned that without providing him with a junior sized rifle stock he may develope bad habits affecting his shooting developement. Are my concerns valid or will he just grow into the rifle stock size as he ages and cope in the mean time?

Thanks
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Old December 11, 2009, 09:22 PM   #2
ljnowell
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I dont know, really that there is a right answer.

I just bought my son a new Mossberg 20 ga Super Bantam with the adjustable stock inserts. I think that it would be best for them to learn the proper shooting techniques from the begining. At least thats what I told my wife when I bought it for him

In reality, I think that my dad, grandpa, and myself all shot guns with too long of a pull, too long a barrel, etc. We learned to shoot and grew into the gun. I dont retain any of the bad habits (I hope) and am a pretty decent shot in adulthood.

So, I guess if you have the money for a youth model, yes it will help. If you dont, hey, the kids shooting, and will eventually grow into it.
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Old December 11, 2009, 10:15 PM   #3
Schneiderman
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I started shooting at 10 mostly with a ruger 10/22 and an old marlin .22 of similar size, by the time I was 14 I had an SKS and Mosin Nagant M44. I never had any formal training but I was the best shot on my NJROTC rifle team and have a few medals from postal competitions. I feel comfortable with any rifle I've ever handled.
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Old December 11, 2009, 10:35 PM   #4
LHB1
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Which is worth more to you, your son or a replaceable rifle and stock? Yep, thought so. Then just go buy an inexpensive single shot .22 rifle and cut off the stock. Save the cut off piece to reattach later. When he grows enough, buy him a full size nice rifle. I think both of you will long treasure the little .22 rifle with cutoff stock for the memories and time together it represents.
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Old December 11, 2009, 11:01 PM   #5
fastforty
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Yep, that's what my dad did. A Savage Model 74. Shortened the stock and carved another pound or two off of it to make it contoured with the receiver. Single shot lever action rolling block, taught me the value of making the first shot count. Still have it, still shoot it, still enjoy it. It's a tack driver.
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Old December 11, 2009, 11:12 PM   #6
MTT TL
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I purchased six position adjustable stocks for my boys 10/22s. Worth every penny. As they have aged they adjust them to where they need to be.
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Old December 11, 2009, 11:13 PM   #7
Mas Ayoob
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Brownell's just announced that they're selling a set of muff-type passive ear protectors, with a set of eye protectors, both sized for junior shooters. The two together are $28.99 and www.brownells.com.
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Old December 11, 2009, 11:14 PM   #8
MeatAxe223
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Sounds like a plan.
I'll modify the stock on the Model 80. That leaves a stock 10/22 and a Glennfield. Will I be able to buy a replacement stock for a Model 80 down the road? You are absolutely right about 22's. My kids love them.
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Old December 11, 2009, 11:55 PM   #9
LHB1
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Quote: "Will I be able to buy a replacement stock for a Model 80 down the road?"

If you want to go that route, why wait to buy the replacement stock? Buy it now and just save it until it's needed. If you can't buy a replacement stock, just drill matching holes in two stock sections (easier to do BEFORE you cut it off originally), insert wooden dowels, and use glass bedding compound to rejoin the two sections. Sand two sections to match contours and refinish with Casey's TruOil.
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Old December 12, 2009, 08:15 AM   #10
m&p45acp10+1
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There are so many affordably priced youth rifles theese days it is hard not to buy one for a young'un. If it is for .22 lr buy a cricket and do not think twice about it. I bought my nephew one when my brother and I started him. He has grown and now has a Rossi .223 single shot youth model. The good part of those is that the barrels are interchangable, so when it is time we will get him a .243 for deer, and hogs. (He got his first coyote with it last week). As for the Cricket my 5 year old neice is now shooting it. She happens to be a crack shot with it too I might add.
For me my first ceter fire was Grampa's 1903 Springfield Star Barrel with the factory peep sight. The first time I shot it I dropped my first deer. 26 years later I still hunt with that tack driver.
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Old December 12, 2009, 09:10 AM   #11
Alan Duke
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My 7 year old son loves his Crickett .22. And it only cost me $108.00 + tax.
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Old December 12, 2009, 10:51 AM   #12
reticle
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My boys all started around age 5 with the same Ruger 10/22. Now they are at various stages of teenage physical development and shoot most every rifle I have with notable accuracy and technique. Didn't need to modify the 10/22 at all.
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Old December 15, 2009, 04:26 PM   #13
markj
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Quote:
My 7 year old son loves his Crickett .22. And it only cost me $108.00 + tax.
My first thought was this one, single shot too.

A ruger 10/22 carbine is a little shorter than the older models, take him to a gun shop and try some on for size.
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Old December 16, 2009, 12:38 PM   #14
Ifishsum
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It does make a difference - I cut down a 10/22 stock for my kids when they learned to shoot. When you want to switch it back it's easy to track down a replacement for little to no cost, as many people upgrade these; in fact I'm pretty sure I have one laying around somewhere myself.
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