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Old February 3, 2013, 08:47 AM   #1
Kalgalath
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You said I can do what?!

I went to an out of the way gun store yesterday to check and see if they had a revolver that I've been looking for.

When I got there I found that they had a huge selection with good prices, (about 50 higher than what I've been finding on Buds website) and a friendly staff treating everyone with respect whether they were there to buy or browse.

I found a Taurus Raging Bull, asked a few questions about it and the guy behind the counter reached in opened the cylinder and handed it to me.

I pulled the hammer back with my thumb and said to the guy "Don't worry I'm not going to dry fire it, I just want to feel the trigger release" He said "It's ok if you want to dry fire it, go ahead"

I was shocked, I didn't know what to say. Never dry fire your weapon was the first thing my father taught me about guns. I even slightly looked around to see if the old man was standing somewhere as if this was some kind of test.

I handed the gun back to the guy, browsed around a little bit and left the store.

I really want to buy this revolver, and they have a good price, but how many times have they let someone like me come in and dry fire that weapon? Are they correct and could my old man be wrong? Did it use to matter and now technology has made it not matter anymore?
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Old February 3, 2013, 08:51 AM   #2
Shadi Khalil
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Unless its used or on consignment, the revolver you fondled is probably just a floor model. Usually when you decide to purchase, they get one from the back. As for the dry firing, did your old man mean other peoples guns or just any gun in general? Nothing wrong with dry firing most well made, modern guns.
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Old February 3, 2013, 08:51 AM   #3
Skadoosh
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Quote:
Never dry fire your weapon was the first thing my father taught me about guns.
Its a well known fact that dry firing will not hurt a modern centerfire firearm.
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Old February 3, 2013, 08:58 AM   #4
Kalgalath
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Quote:
As for the dry firing, did your old man mean other peoples guns or just any gun in general?
I don't know what he meant, but I know after reading your replies he'll hear about it today. Dad being wrong about something is a rarity, last week was his birthday and today I'm buying his lunch at his favorite restaurant. I can't wait for this dinner conversation. Thanks guys.
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Old February 3, 2013, 09:20 AM   #5
Mike Irwin
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Your Dad was probably taught that by his Dad.

At one time dry firing a gun could damage it. Broken springs from dry firing were pretty common with older guns. Dry firing rim fires could also damage the chamber on many firearms.

It's also a general safety concern.

There are still some modernish guns that should not be dry fired, including the CZ 52, 50, and 70, and the Tokarev TT-30/33, among others. They've been known to break firing pins on limited amounts of dry firing.
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Old February 3, 2013, 09:56 AM   #6
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You generally shouldn't dry fire rimfires too much, but anything else is fair game.
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Old February 3, 2013, 10:24 AM   #7
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.

All well & good - but I haven't come down with Triggertus Snapitus just yet. .



.
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Old February 3, 2013, 12:17 PM   #8
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Though I have always believed you could dry-fire most any modern center-fire handgun with impunity, Taurus is one company that advises against dry-firing their centerfire revolvers.
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Old February 3, 2013, 02:07 PM   #9
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Kalgalath, That's a conversation you might just keep to yourself. I never found anything good coming from correcting my father.
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Old February 3, 2013, 02:19 PM   #10
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Some rimfires don't like dry firing. If dry firing a bloody Raging Bull is going to hurt it, just think what a real live round will do :-)

In IDPA, end of stage, you dry fire the gun. Every time. Upsets the guys with Spanish iron. But in real life, it ain't gonna hurt a real gun.

I've dry fired my Taurus plenty. No worries. Go buy that Bull.
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Old February 3, 2013, 03:51 PM   #11
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Never dry fir a gun and never load more than 5 rounds.
When the Colt SAA was the most popular large caliber handgun in the US, both of these were true. It was handed down for several generations of gun people. When I got into Law Enforcement in '77 there were still agencies who would not let you carry 6 rounds in a modern DA Revolver. These are still true for modern made SAA and most clones. The firing Pin is rather cone shaped and when dry fired the firing pin will force metal outward at the hole where the firing pin goes through the frame. It will cause function problems. The same firing pin will rest on the primer if the hammer is lowered onto a loaded chamber, a blow to the hammer will likely fire that round.
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Old February 3, 2013, 04:18 PM   #12
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Quote:
Its a well known fact that dry firing will not hurt a modern centerfire firearm.
Agreed, although, I believe that Taurus recommends that you do not dry fire their guns. At least that was what the manual read with my old M85.


Quote:
Never dry fir a gun and never load more than 5 rounds.
I actually just had the "never have the hammer over a loaded chamber on a revolver" quoted to me on Friday as a fact. It's amazing how some of this stuff just never dies.

Quote:
Dad being wrong about something is a rarity, last week was his birthday and today I'm buying his lunch at his favorite restaurant. I can't wait for this dinner conversation
.

Once upon a time your Dad was right. Times change though and your Dad's info is just a little out of date. Go easy on him.
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Last edited by Kreyzhorse; February 3, 2013 at 04:27 PM.
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Old February 3, 2013, 04:47 PM   #13
gandog56
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I believe that "Never dry fire a gun" is like an old wives tale. May have been true once, but not now. I have since heard like the only guns that are vulnerable to dry firing are some rimfires due to their design. Don't even know if that's correct, either. Still some gun dealers and venders were raised hearing this one, and WILL get upset if you do it. Instead of the disclaimer you offered, just ask them if it's OK if you dry fire it. Yes or no should be your reply.
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Old February 3, 2013, 05:15 PM   #14
jason_iowa
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Ya I don't dry fire rim fires, I have seen pictures of beat up cylinders. Modern center fire handguns, rifles and shotguns should not be an issue. Apparently ruger says you can dry fire their rim fire handguns as well.
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Old February 3, 2013, 05:31 PM   #15
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I also do not dry fire my S&W 66-2 with its hammer mounted firing pin.8 do not believe it is wise to dry fire those as it can cause some rounding of the firing pin
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Old February 3, 2013, 05:44 PM   #16
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Just checked the Ruger site. It says you can dry fire your single six all you like.
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Old February 3, 2013, 06:18 PM   #17
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Once upon a time firing pins were part of the hammer and made of softer stuff than today.
Same was true of the frame mounted inertia style firing pins and even the frames.
Without the cushion of the cartridge case, damage could occur.
As the materials got better and better, dry firing became less of an issue, especially for the inertia style.
But, now that so many manufacturers are using MIM parts, maybe those precautions are true again.
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Old February 3, 2013, 07:01 PM   #18
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Even when people say I can dry fire my Rugers ... I don't.... at least not often. I was taught the same thing as a kid. We mostly shot .22 in those years. I still don't in my center fires. What I will do is keep my thumb on the hammer to gently set the hammer back down. I see no purpose to dry fire a gun and letting the hammer slam home. I treat every gun as if loaded. Just me though. Then I also carry my guns with an empty under the hammer as well... Even my .44Spec Bulldog carry gun only gets four. I'll load six at the range if I am immediately going to shoot (either Ruger or Colt) ... but not for carrying into the field ... just five.... Habits ....

[edited] Never dry fire my percussion revolvers ROA or the others....
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Old February 3, 2013, 07:46 PM   #19
Kalgalath
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Lol, so diner tonight was interesting.

I shared the new information with glee to which he replied...

"Son, you may be bigger than I am and I may be older, and you can do what ever you wish with your personal firearms in your house. But, before you dry fire anything I own you'll need to remember that I know where you live and you have to sleep some time" Happy 67th old man, may you have many more.
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Old February 3, 2013, 10:00 PM   #20
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Your Dad sounds like my kind of man. He handled that conversation like a gentleman.
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Old February 4, 2013, 08:00 AM   #21
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I wonder if "don't dry fire" is even older than cartridge guns. I would think dropping a hammer on a percussion cap nipple wouldn't be good for it.
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Old February 4, 2013, 12:12 PM   #22
mcb66
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I bought a used Ruger Mach 1 semi auto. It wouldn't fire. Sent it back to Ruger and they said the damage was due to dry firing the weapon. There was noticeable damage to the face of the bore where the bullet seats. The gun was replaced at cost. Very cheap for a new discontinued model.
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Old February 4, 2013, 12:30 PM   #23
Mike Irwin
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"I wonder if "don't dry fire" is even older than cartridge guns. I would think dropping a hammer on a percussion cap nipple wouldn't be good for it."

Quite correct. I've seen more than a few percussion guns with nipples smashed flat from dry firing.
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Old February 4, 2013, 02:19 PM   #24
JimDandy
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And don't forget about snap caps. Dry firing may not be bad for most modern centerfires but I'll still drop a snap cap in just to be safe.
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Old February 4, 2013, 05:06 PM   #25
FrankenMauser
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Quite correct. I've seen more than a few percussion guns with nipples smashed flat from dry firing.
Yep. I used to own one.

I had a set of nipples for shooting, and a set for dry-firing. The dry-fire nipples were pretty hammered, by the time I sold it. (No pun intended. )


As for general dry-firing... every firearm I've ever owned has been dry-fired. For some of them, dry-firing is avoided (like the WWII-era Winchester shotgun). Others are dry-fired to decock them, for storage (even rimfires like the Browning Buckmark). And, others have seen many thousands of dry-fire cycles, for practice, trigger work, or finger exercises.

One of the high dry-fire-count firearms is even a Taurus - a PT138 (Gen I).
It was a pile of crap when I bought it, and required a significant amount of tuning, polishing, and tweaking, to run reliably. In the process of doing that work, I dry-fired it several thousand times. And, since then, I've dry-fired it at least 500 more times. It's doing just fine.
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