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Old December 4, 2009, 08:05 PM   #26
smince
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On the one-hand reload: When I took Extreme Close-Range Gunfighting with Gabe Suarez, he had a strip of skateboard tape on the top of his slide between the ejection port and the rear sight (Glock 17). It helps grip the gun better on whatever surface you are using, along with the rear sight (if the sight doesn't have a Novak-type slant).

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What's tough is pulling the gun from the 4 o'clock holster with the left hand - even an open rig without straps or retention.
Another + for Appendix Inside-The-Waistband
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Old December 4, 2009, 10:44 PM   #27
Frank Ettin
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Originally Posted by Playboypenguin
...Do you practice bringing your CCW to bear and firing with just one hand at the range? Do you do this with both your weak and strong hands? Do you choose caliber based on whether you can accurately shoot it one handed?...
yes, yes and yes
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Old December 4, 2009, 11:04 PM   #28
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Quote:
Would you carry a gun you cannot accurately shoot one handed?
No.
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Old December 4, 2009, 11:21 PM   #29
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I think one-handed shooting should be a last resort. It'd be a nice skill to have up my sleeve, but I wouldn't leave a gun at home because of it. For me, accurate shooting in and of itself involves two hands. I can certainly imagine scenarios where I'd want to shoot one-handed, but it's just not something I thought about enough to train for. Maybe when ammo prices come down I'll teach myself to shoot one-handed.
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Old December 4, 2009, 11:39 PM   #30
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Quote:
I think one-handed shooting should be a last resort
For some, not for others.
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Old December 5, 2009, 12:31 AM   #31
XD Gunner
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Quote:
I don't shoot one handed
Really? What if say, you take a bullet in one hand? Or break that hand in the confrontation? Arm in a cast, making you a target, your attacked and only have one hand to use?

I shoot either hand or both.
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Old December 5, 2009, 12:35 AM   #32
firespectrum
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Quote:
For some, not for others.
I agree. If that's how you train then you're going to be more accurate one-handed. But I think it's safe to say that for most people a two-handed grip provides a more stable firing platform. I wouldn't go one-handed unless I absolutely had to use my other hand for something else (idk, pushing a loved one out of the line of fire, tending to a wound, etc). I think in most encounters I would opt for the most stable firing stance possible, but hey I'm just speaking for myself. Back in the day I know one-handed shooting was taught in the Army and was the preferred method in general so obviously one can become accurate one-handed with practice (more power to ya!), but I think the Weaver stance mostly replaced it for a reason.
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Old December 5, 2009, 12:38 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by firespectrum
I think one-handed shooting should be a last resort....
Sorry, but I think that way of thinking is short sighted. In a quickly unfolding violent encounter, there are all sorts of reasons why you might not have the use of both hands. You may need to push aside an obstacle or help move someone to safety. And IIRC studies of actual defensive gun uses have shown that in a significant proportion of them, the defender's gun was fired with one hand.

My personal feeling is that I need to have sufficient confidence in my one handed shooting to be able to engage that way without hesitation if the situation calls for it.
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Old December 5, 2009, 12:47 AM   #34
firespectrum
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In both my posts I acknowledged that there are scenarios where you would need to shoot with one hand and in my first one I expressed the intention to teach myself to shoot one-handed. I'd love to get to the range enough to get good with one hand, but my point is that ANY gun I carry I wouldn't be able to shoot as accurately with one hand as with two so I won't limit my carry options because of it.
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Old December 5, 2009, 06:35 AM   #35
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It’s not wither you or your USMC NYborn SWMBO can shoot better at me, it's if you are incapacitated and the only weapon she can get is your gun. Can she handle it?
It's not really that she shoots better (I'm actually a much better shot).It's that I'll probably call you a ambulance,where as she'd probably perform NY CPR (stomp chest and spit in face).
and yes she can handle my carry gun just fine it works just like her carry gun.and the AR is not much of a problem as the USMC spent a few minutes training her on that platform.
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Old December 5, 2009, 09:21 AM   #36
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Quote:
My personal feeling is that I need to have sufficient confidence in my one handed shooting to be able to engage that way without hesitation if the situation calls for it.
This. When you know you can do it under stress, at high speed, against moving targets etc. it gives you peace of mind- and frees your think box up for problem solving, avoidance threat recognition and the shoot decision.

It is definitely a skill worth learning. A free hand and a clear mind can make a whole lot of difference in how your day finishes up.
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Old December 5, 2009, 03:32 PM   #37
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I can shoot any handgun I can hold one handed as accurately as I can with two hands; but it takes a looooooooooooooooot longer to do so.
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Old December 5, 2009, 10:06 PM   #38
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no. I think I shoot better one handed anyway. <3 my 45
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Old December 5, 2009, 11:19 PM   #39
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I don't think anybody is trying to argue that shooting with one hand is a superior method to shooting with two hands. A proper two hand grip will give you better stability and allow you to manage recoil more effectively for more rapid, accurate follow-up shots.

That said, the ability to perform all handgun-related tasks effectively with one hand is critical. This includes not only shooting, but reloads and malfunction clearing.
Regardless of who you are, there are situations where you might find yourself forced to shoot with one hand. You might be injured, you might be having to fend off an attack with your other hand, or you may have to hang on to your kid/wife/whoever, etc.

As far as the one hand reload, the methods shown in the videos posted earlier are fine for certain situations. In general however, I personally prefer a method that allows me to stay mobile rather than being static while performing the reload.
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Old December 7, 2009, 08:14 AM   #40
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I wouldn't have a gun for any type of defense - CC or Home Defense - that I can't fire one handed. In fact, I practice one and two handed shooting about 50/50 with my main defensive weapon.
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Old December 7, 2009, 08:43 AM   #41
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i own a kimber 9mm paraordanace and i could rock that puppy all night and day one or two handed fired...and yes that is my personal one i carry!! but i wouldent carry a 44magnum i cannot accurateley shoot that!!
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Old December 7, 2009, 10:03 AM   #42
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To carry, or try to use a gun you can not handle with one hand is like having oops kaboom, or misfire.

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Old December 7, 2009, 10:33 AM   #43
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Quote:
I think one-handed shooting should be a last resort.
Shooting is a last resort.

One-handed shooting may be necessary, if you are in the desperate circumstance of needing to shoot at all.

Further, in the past few years, probably 6 people in my social circle have injured their dominant hands, arms, or shoulder in some way: two shoulder surgeries, a broken arm, carpal tunnel problems, you name it. These were pretty much all unexpected injuries or problems that came on very suddenly. I am here to tell you that the ones who already knew how to shoot one-handed with either hand were in a much less vulnerable position during the healing process than those who had to try to learn everything from scratch while in pain from their injuries. All of them looked like prey during their healing periods, but some of them were still able to defend themselves if necessary.

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Old December 7, 2009, 11:01 AM   #44
madmag
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Many years ago the Army's standard shooting stance for pistols (1911 & Revolver) was one handed. I don't shoot that way anymore, but not really hard to hit the target one handed.

Lots of old films around showing GI's shooting one handed.
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Old December 7, 2009, 11:50 AM   #45
Brian Pfleuger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarge
When you know you can do it under stress, at high speed, against moving targets etc. it gives you peace of mind- and frees your think box up for problem solving, avoidance threat recognition and the shoot decision.
While that may be fundamentally true, how many of "us" have either the time, money or inclination to reach that skill level?

Don't get me wrong, it's an ideal, and there ARE those who reach that level, whether it be actual combat experience or heavy, regular, realistic (and expensive!) training.

Setting aside military and law enforcement training, it is a very small fraction indeed.
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Old December 7, 2009, 12:30 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by peetzakilla
While that may be fundamentally true, how many of "us" have either the time, money or inclination to reach that skill level?....
That doesn't change the fact that if someday you find yourself in a "situation", you can not have known ahead of time how difficult your particular problem would be nor what skills would help you solve it to your satisfaction.

Each of us decides how much time, effort and money he is willing to invest in training and practice. If the time ever comes, he'll find out then if it was enough. And there's always the element of luck, but I believe that the better prepared I am, the luckier I'm likely to be.
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Old December 7, 2009, 12:41 PM   #47
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Necessary Skill

and fortunately, easy to practice. And more fun than closing one eye, firm on the bench rest, slow squeeze, bam another xring.

I have a special roll of silhouette targets (cheaperthandirt.com) that are full size, in red. Placed at 7 yards, they are big as life. It is a lot of fun, and very instructional, to pull up from waist height and find the front sight for a point/shoot double tap.(the ranges i visit don't allow draw from holster) Think you can make a double head shot, from only 21 feet away? Try it! Then switch hands.

Good practice. Good fun. Take someone along, and make it a competition with side-by-side targets.

It has the added advantage of providing an accurate sized COM to use for the same exercise. With my Beretta, there's also really no other way to effectively practice the speed and still get the DA/SA trigger change over. With snapcaps, it requires the hammer be cocked manually to achieve the SA pull.

As for one-handed reloading, have to admit i am lax. Will try a drill this weekend with the snapcaps. Is there something out there for one-handed revolver reloads?
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Old December 7, 2009, 06:53 PM   #48
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I would think everyone would want to be good enough with their protection pistol to hit the proverbial pie pan at 15 or 20 feet, with strong hand two hand grip, weak hand two hand grip, strong hand alone and weak hand alone. An extra 20 or 30 rounds per practice session, should keep you up to speed.
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Old December 8, 2009, 11:48 AM   #49
Brian Pfleuger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddletown
That doesn't change the fact that if someday you find yourself in a "situation", you can not have known ahead of time how difficult your particular problem would be nor what skills would help you solve it to your satisfaction.
I don't disagree one bit but I can have a pretty good idea of what skills are MOST likely to be helpful.

If I had to pick ONE single thing that's going to be live or die in a DGU situation, it's going to be not wetting your pants and crying for mamma when it all goes down. In other words, FoF training and/or stress inoculation. Being able to shoot one handed doesn't do a thing for you when TSHTF if you scream like a school girl, wet your pants and empty your 19 round magazine in 1.5 seconds flat into everything EXCEPT the bad guy.

You'll note that I have no FoF training OR stress inoculation. That doesn't change the fact that I think it's the most important thing that I, or anyone, could do to prepare for a lethal force situation.
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Old December 9, 2009, 05:14 AM   #50
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I've only shot offhanded enough to assure myself that it can be done without much difficulty. That requires very few bullets to be wasted. In fact most offhand training can be accomplished with dry fire. It's familiarization and muscle memory you're after. According to science this requires approximately 4K repetitions before your subconscious instinct can take over. Who has that many bullets to waste? Not me... Well not all of the same caliber anyway

I shoot one handed at close range as I backpedal, shoot, and raise the gun to aquire the sights I transition to two hands. That's because my offhand is busy with other things.

I don't purposely handicap my ability to shoot well at a distance by not using both hands to steady the firearm. I have zero tolerance for excuses when it comes to lousy performance.
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