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Old November 21, 2009, 08:45 AM   #1
maximus001
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Citori "Sporting Hunter" 12/28

I'm buying a Citori later today for $995. It's in like new condition but approx. ten years old. I'm curious how the "Sporting Hunter" differs from current models. Anyone out there familiar with this model?
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Old November 21, 2009, 07:18 PM   #2
maximus001
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Well, I shot Trap with my new Citori today and loved it. It was a first for me on three counts. First time shooting Trap, first time shooting an O/U and first time shooting my own gun. I'm hooked!
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Old November 21, 2009, 08:39 PM   #3
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Welcome and awesome - good for you....if you stick with trap, eventually, you will want to get a dedicated trap gun....but what you have will do fine for now. When trap becomes boring to you..., you'll try skeet, then 5-stand, then sporting and eventually, you'll discover FITASC. Along that way, you find that some guns can do multiple jobs decently, but when you become serious about the sports, that specific guns will be filling your safe.........and that's a GOOD thing!
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Old November 21, 2009, 11:16 PM   #4
maximus001
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Thank you for the welcome. much appreciated.

Funny thing is, I started with sporting clay using first a Remington 11-87 then a Beretta 391 and decided along the way that I really wanted an O/U.

Today I just had to get out and shoot and see how the Citori behaved. I was really surprised how her heft (8 lbs. 6 ozs.) reduced recoil and how easy she was to swing and point. I think I'll enjoy the gun very much and would love to have my son inherit it when I need to take the next step. I'm going to introduce him to shooting Trap this coming Wednesday when I pick him up from college.

So is my gun a field model or a sporting model or as her name suggests a combo?
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Old November 22, 2009, 12:55 PM   #5
BigJimP
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Welcome - and good to hear you like the gun.

In terms of what the gun is - in my opinion, the name is irrelevent and just marketing speak. Personally, my primary gun for hunting birds, shooting sporting clays and for Skeet - is a Browning Citori XS Skeet with 30" barrels at about 8 1/2 lbs ( and I've purachased the same gun in 12, 20, 28ga and .410 ) because it fits so well / and I like the weight and feel of that model. I can shoot Trap with it as well .... But my primary Trap gun ( I like a heavier gun for Trap ) because there is less left to right barrel movement - so I go to a Browning Citori XT with 32" barrels for Trap ( at about 10 lbs ) and my primary gun has a Gra-Coil system in it.

The key - is having a gun that "fits" - meaning it hits where you look. To determine your point of impact -take it to a pattern board. Then, if necessary, you can adjust the point of impact up or down etc ...

Have fun / and enjoy the holiday with a new gun and your son home from school.
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Old November 22, 2009, 01:08 PM   #6
zippy13
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With shotguns, the term combo typically applies to a gun with one stock and action and two sets of barrels. With trap guns, a combo is usually a double/single barrel set.

There's no hard and fast rules about what's a field model and what's sporting (target). Here are some of the features that distinguish field and target models:
  • Sling swivels are rarely seen on target guns.
  • Target models are typically heavier that their corresponding field models.
  • Automatically engaging safeties and target guns don't mix. Guns without (or bypassed) safeties are for the target range only.
  • "Flashy" guns with highly reflective and white metal are usually target models. Camo finished guns are destined for the field.
  • Guns with large extensions such as bolt handles, action releases or clamp-on recoil reducers are for the range since they tend to snag things in the field.
  • Target guns will have a vent rib with a mid rib sight; but, these are seen more and more on field guns, too. Guns with wide, high, step and/or adjustable ribs are typically target models.
  • Target guns will have smoother triggers set to a lighter pull than field models.
  • The higher and straighter the stock, the more likely it's a target gun. Guns with a lot of drop are generally field guns. The extremes are obvious but there may be some overlap. Quality target stocks tend to be a little thicker. Few target guns have synthetic stocks. Stocks with adjustable combs were once found only on high end target guns, but are now found on entry level target and some multipurpose models.
  • Barrels with extended forcing cones, over-bored tubes, porting and precision screw-in chokes were once limited to target guns but can now be found on some multipurpose and field models.
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Old November 22, 2009, 01:40 PM   #7
sean gaines
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if you need any new parts for your shotgun, let me know, as my signature says.
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PM me for 40% off on Rudy Project Sunglasses, or 10% off on Briley Mfg. parts and accessories.
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Old November 22, 2009, 07:10 PM   #8
maximus001
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Hey BigJim and Zippy, very helpful, thanks.

I was wondering if all guns were configured specifically for one purpose or another and wanted to get a feel for the pedigree of mine. I get that some guns are serious hunting instruments and others are all about sport competition and others are very expensive works of art while still others are multipurpose (like mine). Now, I might even be able to tell the differences.

I really am having fun with this. My first round of Trap, I hit three or four clays and was thinking maybe this gun is not a great fit but on my third and final round I was over fifteen and feeling pretty good about things. The guy in our group that was shooting best was a college kid with a short barreled pump action and was attacking the clays very early. I think his best round was twenty two.
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Old November 23, 2009, 07:16 PM   #9
BigJimP
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There are different philosophies on whether to "pre mount" a shotgun / or to shoot a "low gun" and mount as the bird is in flight .....

In general ( international games are different ) ...but in general, "pre- mounting a gun" is ok within the rules of Skeet, Trap and Sporting Clays.

Most of the time, I "pre-mount" the gun to my shoulder and my face - then move my eyes only, to where I expect to see the bird clearly, and call for the bird - or I focus on my hold point in Trap (beyond the house) since I don't know the flight path of the target. But in Skeet and Sporting Clays - you always know the flight path of the bird, where its coming from and you should have a "plan" on where to break it. In Sporting Clays, its probably more common to see shooters, shoot "low gun".

To some extent, the dimensions on the stock - may dictate what style stock, weight of gun, etc you choose to use. I've been shooting long enough, and had enough good advice, that I've figured those dimensions out - but most of the time, if a gun is labeled as a "sporting gun" for me, it has too much drop at comb and heel ... but it may fit you great. So it depends....

You're going to hit some plateaus in your Trap shooting. 15 to 18 is a good start ( with a goal of not missing more than 2 birds per station ) / as you transition to 19 - 21 then reset your goals, no misses of more than 1 bird per station. As you go to 22 - 23 average / you need to go straight on some stations - and expect it ! To average a 24 / means 96 out of 100 obviously - so you need to run some 25's / with the goal of never shooting a 23 ( no matter how windy, etc it is that day ). When you shoot a 23 ( with your goal of a 24 avg ) you need to bear down ... and get it back with a 25 on the next squad out.... Don't be hard on yourself / be realistic -- work on hold points, foot position, staying relaxed, calm, one shot at a time, find it, feel the lead, kill it and follow thru ( no quick or uncontrolled movements ). Quick is ok / if its controlled ... Be aggressive / but don't "slap" at a target... Head is always on the comb / eyes are always on the Target and nothing else / and follow thru and keep the gun moving on the target path as the target breaks .... ( my average at the 16 yd line is around 23 / not 24 ... / but an occasional 100 straight still feels pretty good.
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Old November 23, 2009, 07:25 PM   #10
oneounceload
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There are several "mount" styles....FITASC low-gun, which means off the shoulder and below the 25cm line below the shoulder, international skeet, which means on the hip, trap, which means a full mount with face firmly secured to the stock, and then the basic current preferred method called a "soft mount" which is to pre-mount the gun,then take it a little off the shoulder and move your eyes to the trap to watch the target, favored by sporting shooters
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Old November 23, 2009, 07:39 PM   #11
BigJimP
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oneOunce is right / I was simplifying it too much .......there is a lot more to it.
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Old November 23, 2009, 08:10 PM   #12
oneounceload
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Thanks BigJim (hope the furnace stuff went well)

OP - depending on your game - will determine your mount preference. Personally, I shoot sporting about 85%, 5-stand and FITASC about 14% and skeet about 1%. In shooting those disciplines, I prefer low gun for the challenge and to make sure when I shoot FITASC or Int'l Skeet, I am used to low gun, which are required...........I do admit though, when I shoot sporting, I DO premount, then take it low enough to make that "soft mount".....scores are up, even if part of the challenge using this method is slightly down.......

Pick your game, ask questions as to how and what works for your game from your local experts....determine what works for you.

For American skeet, I shoot low gun better with the exception of station 8 - that I shoot pre-mount., but if you ask me about 5-stand or sporting, low gun is the way to go.

figure out what is legal and works for you and go have fun
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