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Old November 20, 2009, 04:23 AM   #1
bamaranger
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tree stand safety

I started a thread elsewhere about tree stand safety, what I carry in my safety vest, etc.

I bowhunt exclusively from treestands, and am curious to hear from other users as to some of their safety practices, preparedness, etc regards elevated stands and preventing falls.

Falls are a big killer/crippler and I'm anxious to hear of any ideas or practices that would increase my/our safety.
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Old November 20, 2009, 04:37 AM   #2
wpcexpert
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Well, me too...I fell...

I did fall this past weekend...about 15 feet from a wooded box stand. It can be attributed to my backpack catching, me missing a step, in a hurry I guess. I fell and hit my feet and rolled mostly straight to my back. My pack broke most of my fall. However, I did have a set of 8 point rattling horns in there. If the back on the pack wouldn't have been so thick, I believe they would have punctured a lung. I ended up with a bruise on my back and a huge bruise to my ego. But me and the rifle ended up just fine. It was held high above my head when I landed. And yes, I actually unloaded it this time.

As far as advise, take you time, wear your harness, and always pay attention to what you are doing. I am primarily bowhunting from a climbing treestand, I've never fallen from one of those.
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Old November 20, 2009, 08:04 AM   #3
Gbro
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Be attentive to your equipment, I had a climber come apart during a youth day safety course. We covered daily and seasonal inspections then went right out and put 10 or more years worth of use to the stand and it came apart with a 12 year old boy descending the tree.
The safety system did its job, but it should never have gotten to that point.
The sling style seat slipped out of 3 buckles at once just as the lad was sitting back. He would have gone out backwards had the saefty system not caught him.
Use safety systems from ground up and down. Many only tie in after sitting in the hunting position. AND use a haul line for all equipment.
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Old November 20, 2009, 08:42 AM   #4
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A subject I am most passionate about......

Here's why:

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/...d.php?t=263730

Read it.

This above incident is what inspired me to become a Hunter's Ed Instructor. I was damn lucky I wasn't paralyzed or killed by that fall.
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Old November 21, 2009, 06:59 AM   #5
shortwave
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Rantingredneck, glad you reposted your incident. Many lessons to be learned from what happened to you. I`ve got a neighbor young man thats spent the last 7-8 yrs in a wheelchair from a fall out of a wooden tree stand when he was 13 yrs old. The boy really loves to turkey hunt and one spot he can get to in his wheelchair is a pine ridge running through the middle of my property. Few years ago he called and asked if he could hunt there. Thats how I met him. I`d heard different stories of his accident but here`s the scoop from him. His fall was from 12ft. A rotten wooden step, screwed to a tree gave way while climbing tree. Being in a hurry to get to the wooden platorm 18ft above he had his fully loaded shotgun slung over his shoulder while climbing. He landed on his shoulder/neck area breaking his neck/back. Luckily the shotgun didn`t go off. Here`s the kicker. He had cut school and layed in the woods all day till older brother got off work and decided to go hunting about 2 in the afternoon. Whats more amazing is this family owns about 100 acres littered with deer stands and the brother chose this stand to go to. The boys got use of his arms but will remain in a wheelchair the rest of his life.
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Old November 21, 2009, 10:06 PM   #6
bamaranger
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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I thought I was careful. "Rantings" account sends shivers through me. I hunt alone, oft times way back. God knows when anybody might find me. I have not typically carried a phone. I'm gonna start.

My vintage climber had been up a zillion trees. I'm in the market for a new one, soon. I'm adding an extra piece of webbing to my tether, to facilitate clipping "in".

thanks Ranting, get better.
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Old November 22, 2009, 08:29 PM   #7
rantingredneck
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bama,

I am doing much better, thanks for the sentiment.

2 years and 2 mos after the accident I have no restrictions to my movement or activities. My neurosurgeon at my last visit (Jan 08) told me to "live your life like you never hurt your back". I do that every day. I hunt just as hard as I used to (but safer). I go to the gym 2-3 times a week and workout harder than I did in my 20's. The stronger I keep my core, the longer I'll go without further back problems. No guarantee that 30-40 years from now the hardware won't have to come out or be replaced with something else (likely better tech by then).

The lessons I learned from my accident were:

1) no home built stands.
2) SAFETY HARNESS 100% of the time.
3) have a way to call for help! Phone, radio or both.
4) Let people know where you will be and what time to expect you back.
5) have enough gear in your pack to keep you alive for a night in the woods. Shelter, fire, water, basic first aid.
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Old November 23, 2009, 02:39 AM   #8
bamaranger
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home mades bad news

Yeah, I have seen a pattern w/ homemades, nail ups and trouble.

I am doing all you describe, just not every time. Am guilty of jumping in the truck and going, and had a "thing" about not carrying a phone.

Looked at a new(er) used Old Man stand today, but it didn't talk to me.

Am glad you are better.
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