The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Dave McCracken Memorial Shotgun Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old November 17, 2009, 02:48 AM   #1
GRJ
Member
 
Join Date: December 9, 2007
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 17
Turkey shoot

A local Shrines gun club is having a turkey shoot.
One shot each for $5.00, winner splits that rounds' takings with the house.

My question is; they are setting up the targets at 70+ feet
I have a single shot Stevens 12 gauge, 28" barrel, I'm looking at aiming between the top ring & center to have a chance at winning.

Any suggestions? Advise?
__________________
Life's rough, it's rougher if your stupid... John Wayne
GRJ is offline  
Old November 17, 2009, 05:01 AM   #2
hogdogs
Staff In Memoriam
 
Join Date: October 31, 2007
Location: Western Florida panhandle
Posts: 11,069
There are 2 types of winning score usually... Closest pellet to the "bull" or "X" and most pellets on paper. If the first... then the cheap promo ammo my 2 local turkey shoots use... it is really a game of chance at the 95 feet we shoot.

If the second, the guys will use real tight chokes to win. My best advice is to see if they will tell you what ammo they have bought and ask to come early to shoot the same ammo you buy in your gun to practice... One of our turkey shoot hosts is a hunt club and will let us show up early to practice.

Brent
hogdogs is offline  
Old November 17, 2009, 07:35 PM   #3
GRJ
Member
 
Join Date: December 9, 2007
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 17
They are not allowing any chokes and special rigs, just off the shelf shot guns.
Your right, it's the pellet closest to center.
__________________
Life's rough, it's rougher if your stupid... John Wayne
GRJ is offline  
Old November 17, 2009, 07:58 PM   #4
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,410
This type of shoot often boils down to being a lottery by shot shell. Usually the boomer boys from the local trap club have an advantage because they are more tuned into how their guns perform than average shooters. However, when the winner is determined by the closest single pellet, as opposed to the most pellets within a given area (circle or turkey outline), then luck plays an even bigger role.
zippy13 is offline  
Old November 17, 2009, 09:36 PM   #5
Waterengineer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 7, 2006
Location: Aurora, CO and Palm Beach, FL
Posts: 861
Zippy has given you the correct advise.

Since it is closeness to the "X" use the tightest choke you have.

Mathematically, it will but the most pellets in the smallest circle, giving you the best chance to have one close to the "X". The End.

Oops, I see you are shooting an old single shot Stevens. What is the choke on that? M, IM or F?
Waterengineer is offline  
Old November 18, 2009, 04:15 PM   #6
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,410
If you've never been to a turkey shoot and are considering trying one, here are some points to ponder…

Turkey shoots are generally held for two reasons, as organization fund raisers or as gun club autumn fun shoots. Your odds of winning are probably better at a club fun shoot.

There are two different types of turkey shoots, skill based and mostly luck. If you're an accomplished shooter (or think you are) you'll gravitate towards the skill type shoot. If you're neither a comp shooter nor ace hunter, then the luck type shoot may have a greater appeal.

Turkey shoots can be organized any way the management wants. Usually ease of operating the shoot is a major consideration. It's best to keep the shoot progressing a steady pace. So, events involving elaborate, or time consuming scoring, are best avoided. In the case of the previously discussed shoot, it's much easier to score a closest single pellet than to count holes.

The last turkey shoot I attended was a skill type held at the club's trap ranges. For the price of a standard trap ticket you got a chance for a turkey. Squads of ten (2 men per station) shoot 10 targets, 2 per station, of 16-yard trap. If you were a comp shooter, you were assigned to a handicap event. A turkey was given to the winner of each squad and ties were broken sudden death. This kept the shoot progressing at a steady pace and there was no waiting around for pellet holes to be measured or counted. If you missed, you could try again on another 16-yard squad. If you'd already won a turkey, then you would be assigned to a handicap squad.

To maximize you chances in a shoot like this, start later to take advantage of the remaining shooters. As the shoot progresses the better shooters will have been assigned yardage, so there is less competition at the 16-yard line. Almost everyone is guaranteed a turkey if they are persistent.

Also, as the shoot nears completion, the management may permit shorter squads. They will already have paid for all the turkeys so fielding a squad of less than 10 still makes them a profit. For the shooter, the smaller the squad the better their chance of winning.

For the luck type of shoot, obviously the fairest method would be to require everyone to shoot the same gun with the same ammo; however, most folks would balk at not being allowed to shoot their own gun. If the club allows any ammo to be used, then the blue-dot boys are at a significant advantage with their with their custom tailored boomers. If only factory loads are permitted, then obviously you want to use the load with the maximum (smallest) number pellets of that will go the distance and get the job done. Avoid promotional loads with questionable components and get first rate target loads. Some luck type shoots may involve popping balloons or other task beyond penetrating paper. Make sure your loads are up to the job. The more prepared you can be, the better your chances of winning a luck type of event.

Good luck, have fun, and be safe.
zippy13 is offline  
Old November 18, 2009, 10:38 PM   #7
Doyle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 20, 2007
Location: Starkville, MS (new to MS)
Posts: 4,801
I have never liked shotgun based turkey shoots. Too much is given to chance (closest pellet to center) or choke (densest pattern). The best turkey shoot I ever shot at was for .22 rifles. Iron sights only. They supplied the ammo. The target was an aspirin tablet glued to a black target. It splattered really well when hit.
Doyle is offline  
Old November 19, 2009, 06:58 PM   #8
hub
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 21, 2008
Posts: 4
Quote:
The target was an aspirin tablet glued to a black target.
So what if two or ten people hit the aspirin in the same round? How do you decide who the winner is? Is it supposed to be luck shot or something? I mean lets be serious, some people here can shoot 3-5 round groups the size of an aspirin at 100yds with a .22lr.

I've done some indoor turkey shoots with .22s at the local American Legion but we always used birdshot with the same concept as the shotgun shoot, closest pellet to the X wins. Sometimes it's takes a caliper or at least a good eye and magnifing glass to determine who is closest.

Quote:
Too much is given to chance (closest pellet to center)
I think that is the whole point, it's a gambling game, you can buy the best gun, barrel, and choke combo but no one can guide or aim a individual pellet into the X with a shotgun.

Most real turkey shoots to have rules of max barrel length and choke restriction to keep it a game of chance not who has the best gun wins everytime. Most people would get tired of losing their money if they didn't really think they had at least a chance to win.

Last edited by hub; November 19, 2009 at 07:05 PM.
hub is offline  
Old November 19, 2009, 07:22 PM   #9
Doyle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 20, 2007
Location: Starkville, MS (new to MS)
Posts: 4,801
Quote:
So what if two or ten people hit the aspirin in the same round?
Each shooter got their own card with their admission fee. The last time I did this was back in my college days. I recall paying $1.00 per bullet. I bought 5 chances and hit the aspirin on my last shot. So, the frozen turkey that sold for about $10.00 back then cost me $5.00. I came out ahead. Most people couldn't hit it so they lost money.
Doyle is offline  
Old November 19, 2009, 08:51 PM   #10
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by hub
Most real turkey shoots…
I always thought a REAL turkey shoot was called hunting
They reintroduced wild turkeys in our area (rural San Diego County, CA) several years ago. The big birds have thrived and the program has been so successful that they had an extra turkey season this year.
zippy13 is offline  
Old November 19, 2009, 09:30 PM   #11
hub
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 21, 2008
Posts: 4
I would make sure your Stevens is a full choke then go out and pattern it with the cheapest bulk birdshot around. Chances are that's what they will probably be using.

Most of the shoots around here are either 30yds or 50yrds. I would start by patterning at 30yds.

One great and cheap ways I've found to do this is by getting a cheap or left over roll of christmas paper. Stretch it out white side showing along a fence or in between trees, staple and put a few x's on it with a black marker a couple of feet apart. Shoot the x's, check, adjust, then just roll out another section for round two.

I only takes one pellet in the right spot to win but if you don't know where to aim to get the most dense part of the pattern in the card your just cheating yourself. Good luck.
hub is offline  
Old November 19, 2009, 09:31 PM   #12
hub
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 21, 2008
Posts: 4
Thanks Doyle that explanation makes more sense to me now. I've never seen one done like that around here but it sounds fun.
hub is offline  
Reply

Tags
turkey shoot

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09017 seconds with 9 queries