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Old November 2, 2009, 05:52 PM   #1
mench10
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1917 Remington .30-06

I have a 1917 model Remington .30-06, and I believe it was a sniper rifle from WW1. The butt protector had some sort of medallion on it. Does anyone out there know this rifle? Right now I just use it at the range, but am thinking about having it drilled and tapped for scope mounts for next fall's moose hunt.
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Old November 2, 2009, 06:13 PM   #2
Tom2
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It would already have some sort of holes for a scope mount if it had been some sort of a sniper rifle. And if you alter the gun, if it is in fact in original military configuration, you will destroy value. IF it is already altered too much from military configuration, it will not really matter. Whatever the medallion is, it is not a military item, I do not think. But you must post pictures, especially before you mess with it. Those of us looking can be alot more specific if we know exactly what you have.
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Old November 2, 2009, 06:14 PM   #3
brian45auto
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all m1917 rifles were produced during the 1917-1919 time frame. it is believed a large number were assemled during ww2 from left over new parts from the original run. they were overhauled at the conclusion of the first war and put in poorly controlled storage. twenty years later in the opening days of ww2 the overhaul program was restarted as result of their poor condition, and then through out the war. in addition several contracts were awarded for manufacture of new replacement barrels during the second war.
there were no sniper versions of the rifle. winchester was to make a sniper version, that would have became the m1918 but none are known to exist.

if your gun is complete, drilling and tapping would wreck a rifle that is not overly common, and even less understood.
i would suggest not drilling it.
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Old November 2, 2009, 06:40 PM   #4
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Sounds like a 1917 Enfield (Remington but Eddystone made some too). They are reather heavy and I don't know of any that were of the sniper version. (Those were the 1903-A4s).

If original with all orginal parts, I'd keep it stock. However if you must, it can be drilled and tapped and would make an excellant hunting rifle. A bit heavy (the action that is) but that too can be modified if'n you want to sporterize it starting by grinding off the ears, etc.

The 1917 Action is a long action (for runner to the Model 721 Action, one of the strongest out there). Being a long action it leaves it open to a wide range of calibers. I made a 416 Rigby out of mine. Good action for making a cheap 338 Lup Sniper(sic) rifle.

If you are gonna shoot it, I'd recomending getting the firing pin assby. changed so it cocks on openning as opposed to closed on closing. Its rather cheap and easy, get them from Sacco (shotgun news) or gunpartcorp.com. All you do is screw the firing pin assembly out of the bolt and screw in the new one. Wont hurt the value because you can always put the old assembly back in.

Hard to find a better, stronger action.
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Old November 2, 2009, 06:51 PM   #5
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Sounds like a 1917 Enfield. If it's in its original configuration, DON'T alter it! It's worth much more like it is. Give us some pictures, maybe we can help.

I have a 1917 Enfield that was build by Winchester. Unfortunately it was altered before I got it. It's a very fine shooter, and a very reliable, accurate hunting rifle. However, if it were in original condition, it would be worth $1500 - $2000. As it is, it's worth the $200.00 that I paid for it.
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Old November 3, 2009, 08:30 AM   #6
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Love my Rem P-17. Don't believe there was a sniper config.
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Old November 3, 2009, 11:52 AM   #7
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Quote"Sounds like a 1917 Enfield. If it's in its original configuration, DON'T alter it! It's worth much more like it is. Give us some pictures, maybe we can help.

I have a 1917 Enfield that was build by Winchester. Unfortunately it was altered before I got it. It's a very fine shooter, and a very reliable, accurate hunting rifle. However, if it were in original condition, it would be worth $1500 - $2000. As it is, it's worth the $200.00 that I paid for it. "Quote






Wow! That must be some 1917 you've got there.
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Old November 3, 2009, 02:09 PM   #8
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AFAIK zero M1917's were manufactured as or altered by the factory, armories, or military to become sniper rifles. That was always the province of the 1903.
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Old November 4, 2009, 12:28 PM   #9
mench10
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Thanks everyone. I'll post some pics when I get a chance.
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Old November 5, 2009, 11:36 AM   #10
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Quote:
The 1917 Action is a long action (for runner to the Model 721 Action,
Other than being turn-bolts and their action lengths, the 1917 Enfield and the Remington Model 721 have little in common. Perhaps you were thinking of the Remington Models 30A, 30R, 30S, 30 Express or the Model 720A-the 1917 Enfield was not only a forerunner to the 30 series but, with only slight modifications, is essentially the same rifle. Remington made the 30 series from 1921 to 1940.The Model 720A (also R and S) was also a direct derivative of the 1917 Enfield and was made from 1941 to 1944.
The Model 721 was not introduced until 1948 and it was made until 1962, when it was replaced by the similar in design Model 700 rifle.
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Old January 3, 2014, 10:01 PM   #11
82ndMedic
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1917 Remington

I have a weapon my father in law gave to me that says US model of Remington 1917 and the # 276917 under this stamped into the breech of the weapon. I have not fired it yet but want to know if anyone can tell me if the flip up sight would be in meters or feet? It is in excellent condition and I will be posting pictures soon.
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Old January 3, 2014, 11:23 PM   #12
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The magazine will hold 6 30-06 cartridges BTW. If it has the 2 groove barrel they do not do well with boattail bullets, but can be very accurate with flat base ones. That rifle is nearly a century old and are not made anymore. Please don't alter it. It is a tangible piece of American history.

I don't understand why some people feel the need to change cock on closing rifles to cock on opening. No slam or flames to the poster above who suggested it; I just don't get it. I have rifles that are some of each and I just take them as they are.
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Old January 4, 2014, 12:15 AM   #13
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Wow. Another zombie post rising from the dead.

82ndMedic, the markings on the rear sight are in yards.
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Old January 4, 2014, 05:40 AM   #14
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82nd Medic- I believe that would be 'yards'.
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Old January 4, 2014, 07:50 AM   #15
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Thanks "senior members" helped a lot. Never owned a weapon with the flip up sight but will enjoy this one.
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Old January 4, 2014, 07:54 AM   #16
gyvel
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Quote:
Sounds like a 1917 Enfield (Remington but Eddystone made some too). They are reather heavy and I don't know of any that were of the sniper version. (Those were the 1903-A4s).
There were no 1903-A4s in the First World War. Issue snipers were standard 1903s equipped with (among others) a Warner-Swazey of rather odd design. I've handled one in my life and it was definitely unusual.
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Old January 4, 2014, 09:42 AM   #17
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10-96 thanks for the response. I had considered yards but have only had the weapon a short time and I was used to the Army range distances in meters. So at the risk of offending those that dislike " zombie posts" thanks again.
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Old January 4, 2014, 01:19 PM   #18
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For those who complain about the sporterizing of those old rifles:

In 1950, a Winchester Model 70 cost around $70 or so. A DCM rifle was about $8.

Gunsmithing to mill off the ears, drill and tap for a scope, and cut the barrel back and recrown was $25 to $30. A Dayton-Traister trigger conversion was around $15, if you wanted to make that change.

In 1950, saving $20 or $30 was "real money" for a teenager.
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Old January 4, 2014, 09:01 PM   #19
WIN71
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DIY

Quote:
For those who complain about the sporterizing of those old rifles:

In 1950, a Winchester Model 70 cost around $70 or so. A DCM rifle was about $8.

Gunsmithing to mill off the ears, drill and tap for a scope, and cut the barrel back and recrown was $25 to $30. A Dayton-Traister trigger conversion was around $15, if you wanted to make that change.
There were even instruction books for the semi handyman

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Old January 5, 2014, 04:15 PM   #20
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alright I'll throw in my .02
Sniping is a relatively new concept. it was not really wide spread in WWI. the idea was you sit in your trench and wait for the enemy to be dumb enough to try to hop in the trench next to you. the concept of kill shots at several hundred yards was still very much laughed at. there were marksmen but still no real true blue snipers. people often call Simo Hayha, a Finnish marksman, the best sniper who ever lived but the fact of the matter is that most of his kills were close range, many were even done with a handgun, his style though remeniscent of sniping was still far from tactics used in WWII to modern day.

so with all that said. your M1917 was not a sniper rifle. it is heavily contested that sergeant Alvin York(if you don't know him, he was an american marksman from WWI) used a M1917 but there are others that claim he used a springfield 1903 and the movie Sergeant York depicted him using a springfield 1903. they are good rifles and were by far the most common among US troops during WWI. however with that said. that rifle is a collectable. in 3 years the first of those will be turning 100 years old and in 4, all will be 100 years old. they are highly sought after and many have been drilled, tapped and otherwise permenantly modified to the point that they have no collectors value. if yours is indeed original, I would implore you to not modify that rifle, even if it was not really a sniper rifle. there are hundreds of thousands that have already been modified that are much cheaper(because they no longer hold collectors value) and would save you the trouble of scoping.

I am not normally a purist and will never judge someone for chopping up their own property but I really do hate to see yet another M1917 changed into something that they were never intended to be.
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Old January 5, 2014, 04:17 PM   #21
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awe dangit I just fell into another zombie trap.
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