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Old October 6, 2009, 06:01 PM   #1
OhioDuck
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Info wanted on this gun please.

First I will say sorry for the poor quality of the pictures. They were taken while on a visit out of state. The gun was offered to me for sale but I want to find out what it is and worth first. I was told it was a 1917 British Enfield 303.
http://s169.photobucket.com/albums/u211/thestonesaver/



A newbie to guns I just want a little history of the gun and what it is worth so I dont overpay for it. Thanks for any and all help.
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Old October 6, 2009, 06:29 PM   #2
robhof
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From the pics. it appears to be an Enfield in fair condition (a shooter) with a recoil pad addet, that reduces any collector value. Look an Gunbroker and Auctionarms to get an idea of the range of prices as they can vary greatly, also check the bore and rifling, as many older millitary rifles have been shot enough to wear out the barrel.
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Old October 6, 2009, 06:55 PM   #3
emcon5
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Looks like a Lee-Enfield Mk I, sportorized and missing the magazine.

It should look like this rifle pulled at random from Gunbroker:
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=141118896
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Old October 6, 2009, 07:48 PM   #4
gyvel
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It's a No. 1 Mk III* Lee-Enfield that looks to have been a nice old gun before it got butchered. The good news is that it could be restored as it looks like nothing has been done to the barrel or action. Personally, I wouldn't pay more than $75.00 for it, mainly because you are looking at another $100-125 in parts to make it right.
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Old October 6, 2009, 08:51 PM   #5
tater134
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Quote:
It's a No. 1 Mk III* Lee-Enfield that looks to have been a nice old gun before it got butchered. The good news is that it could be restored as it looks like nothing has been done to the barrel or action. Personally, I wouldn't pay more than $75.00 for it, mainly because you are looking at another $100-125 in parts to make it right.
Today 07:55 PM
Springfield Sporters has stocks sets with metal included for $60.00.This rifle would be a great candidate for a restoration
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Old October 7, 2009, 01:40 AM   #6
gyvel
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Springfield Sporters has stocks sets with metal included for $60.00.This rifle would be a great candidate for a restoration
Unfortunately, their sets are Indian wood from Ishapore and have the tell-tale screw through the forend just ahead of the action. I couldn't tell who the maker of his gun was as the photos are poor quality. If he's got an Ishapore, the $60.00 set might work, but add your shipping ($12-15), a magazine ($25-35), and you're over a hundred.

I still wouldn't pay more than $75.00 for it.
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Old October 7, 2009, 02:27 AM   #7
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If yo don't want it I'll give the guy $20 bucks for it!
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Old October 7, 2009, 06:44 AM   #8
mp25ds4
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realisticly its worth about 140-170
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Old October 7, 2009, 12:22 PM   #9
emcon5
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I would take a pseudo-restoration with Ishi furniture over how it is now. That being said as it sits it looks like a decent utility rifle (if you stuck a magazine in it of course).

How much is he asking?
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Old October 7, 2009, 03:09 PM   #10
James K
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Come on, guys. There are a gadzillion of those "sporterized" L-E's out there. They make cheap but reliable and powerful hunting rifles. Period. To attempt to "restore" one is plain silly, no matter how good it might make you feel, and buying one for that purpose is a waste of money. There is little point in doing a restoration that will never be really "correct", while spending twice or three times what the gun would ever be worth in doing so.

There are plenty of un-Bubba'd L-E rifles if one wants one in something approximating original condition. Trying to restore a junker is pointless.

Jim
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Old October 8, 2009, 06:47 AM   #11
PetahW
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I wouldn't buy it at all.

Even if it was given to you, to find/buy a mag alone would cost at least $25 - almost half it's worth.

And that's w/o knowing if the headspace/bolt head's correct.

There's a LOT of fish in the sea - Look for a better example, if you GOTTA have a British .303.

.
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Old October 8, 2009, 09:06 AM   #12
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There are plenty of un-Bubba'd L-E rifles if one wants one in something approximating original condition. Trying to restore a junker is pointless.
Yup! You end up with more money in a non original rifle than if you just bought a good one to start with.
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Old October 9, 2009, 10:08 PM   #13
DG45
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There was about zero "collector" interest in these things back in the 1950's and 1960's when they were so plentiful that they were a drug on the gun market. But beacoup of them were sold for a pittance to guys who wanted a hunting rifle but couldn't afford a fine new gun. So, they'd spend a few bucks to buy one of these heavy-as-lead surplus Lee-Enfields or Mausers or whatever, and then "sporterize" it, which usually meant either completely restocking it or cutting the military stock down like was done to this one. Once the gun was a few pounds lighter, that .303. got tough on the shoulder, so a lot of these guns had recoil pads added. I agree with Jim Keenan that the result was usually a reasonably effective, very inexpensive hunting gun. There's not much interest in these homely "sporterized" military surplus guns today. The long, uninterrupted, ever-growing economic prosperity that this country enjoyed for about 50 or 60 years after WWII (until it ended in the recent downturn) put a chicken or two in most of our pots, and now most of us are affluent enough that we can afford hunting rifles that were actually built to be hunting rifles. It wasn't always that way though, and it's a cheap shot today for someone to sneer at an earlier and less prosperous generaton for "sporterizing" surplus military weapons into practical and effective hunters. That's adding arrogance to ignorance. Nevertheless, it is true that the"sporterization" work that was done on this gun and others just like it, has, in fact, greatly depreciated "collector" value. Since there isn't much hunter interest anymore in these "sporterized" military surplus guns either, the result is that they are not worth much to anyone anymore. I'd say $50 to $75 would be top dollar for the OP's gun today. That's still probably $30 to $50 more than the gun was purchased for in the 1950's or $60's. (Yeah, yeah, I know that the dollar's worth a lot less now than it was then.)
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Old October 9, 2009, 10:38 PM   #14
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DG, That may be the the largest paragraph ever written.

Without going into all of the details, the .303 was similar to the 1903A3. If the action a bbl are good it's a perfectly servicable rifle. I bought and sold about 1K of them in the late '60's , early '70's. They were generally going for about $35 back then.

I'd just make it work for you, it's really a great rifle.
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Old October 10, 2009, 12:33 AM   #15
DG45
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You just haven't read much of my stuff Swampghost. That's nowhere near the longest paragraph I've ever written.
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Old October 10, 2009, 08:41 AM   #16
robhof
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My brother and I were intersted in guns as teens in the 60's and bought gun magazines; when they sold guns via the mail and there were pages of war surplus and none over $100. with rifles usually being cheaper than pistols. Found an old mag when cleaning out my parents house a few years ago; M1carbines $50-$75 depending on condition, Enfields $25 to $50, Lugers from $50 to $100, Garands were the exception $100 to $175, but the $175 were new. That all ended with Kennedy in Dallas.
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Old October 17, 2009, 07:36 PM   #17
TEDDY
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SMLEs

they were selling for$9.95 in natick Mass.in the 60s.and carcanos for $7.95.
1903A3 for $15 from DCM and 1917s were $7.50 1911s were $18 + shipping.
I got two new 1903A3s
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