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Old September 23, 2009, 02:07 PM   #1
emtmark
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Rem Mod 11, great grandpas gun

near as i can tell from looking here, there and searching the almighty google I have been givin a remington model 11 serial 46874 (found just ahead of the loading gate/area) the barrell is marked with remington at the 12 with browning patent dates and "full" at he 9 oclock (indicates full choke i hope), the barrel is 28" from bead to end of enclosed tube, behind the ring (which rides on the magazine tube, not friction rings, its attached to the barrel) are the markings 46874, a slash moving down from left to right stamped into the metal, the letter "B", and an upside down V or delta. While i'm not complelety gun illiterate I am not by any means knowledgeble about this shot gun. The stock was broken at the wrist by presumably my elders and repaired with what looks like tar tape. It functions but very stiff and slow with lots of resistance, there is a button on right side that acts as a bolt release or allows loading of shells. the forestock is intact and what looks like a pices of cork in the end of the magazine. the safety is on the trigger itself. What do i have here? id like to shoot it but obviously its pretty old, it is in my family and is refered to by my grand mother as dads elephant gun. Oh and the firing pin appears to be round when viewed from the bolt face ive not been able to dissasemble it as I don't want to break it, yet! Please give me a jingle or post up if you can help! Mark ps I don't always have a lot of cash but i make some bad ass first aid kits and maybe you need one, we can chat! thank you guys your input is always top notch. Got my old revolver ID'ed and fixed up quick!
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Old September 23, 2009, 02:39 PM   #2
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YIKES - use a period or two......Hard to read.

Try cleaning it first - it may be stiff from some gunk buildup.

With the action closed. slip a wooden dowel down the barrel, mark and measure - that will give you the length. Full does mean full choke.
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Old September 23, 2009, 03:02 PM   #3
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lol, yeah punctuation and cursive are things that just diddn't take with me. I'll try to do better. I've been told I type in "stream of thought". That helped me once in a single essay in college. Not getting graded for it in real life I've never really put much effort into it, meh. I will endevour to improve good sir.

28in on the wood dowel, spoke with a remington rep. He believes the gun was a 1905-1906 based on his records. Had nothing bad to say except that the stock will be hard to find, any leads on that?
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Old September 23, 2009, 04:13 PM   #4
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Check the chamber dimension, make sure it is for 2-3/4 inch shells and not 2-1/2. Some older guns from that era were. Remember a 2-3/4 will fit in a 2-1/2" gun because the measurement listed is the fired hull length. IF it is 2-1/2, do not shoot 2-3/4 - too long, too much pressure, bad things happen to nice people that way.

Try Numrich for parts......also shotgunworld.com has sections for lovers of various makes (scroll down past the basic sections). IIRC, there is a section for Remington fans - they might be able too point you in the right direction
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Old September 23, 2009, 07:45 PM   #5
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Beside being a priceless heirloom, the 11 is a better than typical shotgun.

Made by Remington on a JMB patent, these were one of the reasons magazine plugs were invented.

Early market hunters added mag extensions and annihilated whole flocks of waterfowl.

Early ones have short chambers. Polywad and Fiocchi carry 2 1/2" ammo among others. Or, class act smiths like Jess Briley or Mike Orlen can work it over into a 2 3/4" gun.

Due to age, I'd stick to lighter loads and skip the non toxics. Also, it's not a great candidate for a flat black tactical makeover.

Brownell's has stocks at times. Wenig will make you one, but it's pricey.

And, in your shoes I'd have a good smith take it down, clean and lube it and replace the buffer at the rear of the receiver. After a century or so, it may need it.

HTH....
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Old September 23, 2009, 07:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Jess Briley or Mike Orlen can work it over into a 2 3/4" gun.
True, but can it then handle the new, higher pressures?? I'm not so sure - better to stick with what it was meant to shoot, IMO
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:04 PM   #7
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You can go to Remington's website, and under the Contact Us tab, send them an email. Tell them the serial number and they can tell you the model, grade, and year it was produced.
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:12 PM   #8
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Oneoz, note the next sentence. Lighter loads like, uh, one oz.....
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:15 PM   #9
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Dave I saw that, but too many folks here won't.....YOU know that, I know that, a few others here know that, most don't......many don't realize that the stated length is the fired shell length and will drop an unfired one in an old gun, see that it fits and pull the trigger - possibly with disastrous results....


I'm just sayin'................
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:16 PM   #10
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Good point....
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:22 PM   #11
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After reading threads on here and other forums, I need reminding at times that certain factoids I take for granted may not be known as basic truths by many folks, especially those just buying a gun or, in this case, getting an old gun as an inheritance.........

Not sure if some form of a sticky is in order or not........
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:30 PM   #12
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update

got to speak with a remington fellow who did the checkin and stated "wow...........that makes it........well..........1905"
1905 to 1906 were numbers 34054-48840!
HOW COOL IS THAT!
We chatted for a while and it is a 2 3/4 gun, the safety on the trigger was from 1905 to 1928, and if i can find a stock shoot it. With the caveats of lead loads, good cleaning, and once over by a smith. I may need a tutorial about the friction rings and as always with these things i'm going to start looking for a manual. I do want to shoot it if at all possible, at least once, maybe more.
numrich, gunparts.com and surplusrifle .com have all been reccomended
whats too much for a stock? I would like to get one I just don't want to go for a ride if can avoid it. mark
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Old September 23, 2009, 08:48 PM   #13
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EXCELLENT....I recently saw a thread where someone posted a link to the manual....try a google search, I'll bet you can find it before I do (in my house the wife is the google queen)

even though they stated it is 2-3/4, I would stick to low pressure target loads - no need to beat this lady up..........

Places like Numrich will charge what they charge - they're not gougers, but they're not a garage sale outlet either - remember - you're looking for a part to fit a 100 plus year-old gun - they're not exactly going to be in your local wally world

AND WHERE THE HECK ARE THE PICS OF THIS BEAUTY???????

Enquiring minds want to see!
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Old September 23, 2009, 09:07 PM   #14
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Browning stocks won't work on a Remington Model 11, well at least not look good doing it. If that date is correct that wasn't really a model 11 they called them Remington Autoloading Shotguns back then, I don't remember the date when they stamped the Model 11 on the reciever though.

For parts including a stock here is a place that has them.
http://www.gun-parts.com/index.html/

For the manual here is a PDF of it.
http://stevespages.com/pdf/remington_11.pdf

Is yours a pistol grip stock or straight stock? If it is a straight stock you might be able to work a Model 8 stock and get it to fit with some wood working.
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Old September 23, 2009, 11:30 PM   #15
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can i post them here?
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Old September 23, 2009, 11:43 PM   #16
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Old September 23, 2009, 11:48 PM   #17
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there is no model 11 stamped on the receiver, i'm hard pressed to find anything stamped on the receiver! lol. the remington tie in was from the barrell markings where my new shotguns would have a shell size mark and makers stamp. it just says remington blah blah next line browning pat number 1 through bazillion

i got to go to bed ill try and get back to this when i get home in a couple of days
thanks yall im having a blast learning about this gun
mark
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Old September 24, 2009, 01:14 AM   #18
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Yours is a little earlier than mine @ #114117 And the 11 had a rep for breaking/splitting stocks and forends. After 2 of them I went for the black plastic/fiberglass and no more problems. Low base put the Tapered ring between the receiver and spring, high base between the friction ring & spring with the taper toward the friction ring.
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Old September 24, 2009, 12:55 PM   #19
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Related, but not a large thread shift...

I thought the Garrand type safety within the trigger guard of the M11 was discontinued atound 1909 or so.

Help clear the cobwebs.

salty
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Old September 24, 2009, 01:43 PM   #20
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emtmark-
You can get stocks and a few parts from Numrich Arms.
http://www.e-gunparts.com/DisplayAd....SKU=159560&MC=

A little trivia:
Remington made the first Browning A5 shotguns after Winchester turned down the design because it didn't have a lever. Remington made shotguns for Browning until they had a falling out over another one of Browning's designs. JMB went to Belgium on a trip and met up with the folks at FN, who jumped at the chance to make guns for Browning.
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Old September 24, 2009, 03:47 PM   #21
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Scorch, that seems to be the rumor floating around the net for some reason or another but it's not quite correct. When I was at the musuem in Ogden this is what they have posted near his "workshop".

"John Moses Browning, the legendary American gun designer, invented the first practical self-loading shotgun in 1898. In fact, Browning designed and patented three different systems, but finally choose the last one to go ahead. It must be noted, that at the time the autoloading shotgun was something of absolute novelty, and the task of designing such gun was severely complicated by the fact that the switch over from black powder to smokeless ammunition was well under way, and general quality of shotgun ammunition was rather uneven, to say the least. Nevertheless, Browning managed to make hist prototype model work, and work well. He first offered this shotgun to Winchester, which was the sole buyer for his designs from 1886 on. However, severe technical conservatism on the part of the Winchester's boss, T.G.Bennett, and financial disagreements (Browning insisted on royalty-based payments, but Winchester at the time always bought new designs for fixed amount of money) resulted in break between the designer and the company. Browning then turned to Remington, but tragic death of the Remington's president from a heart attack just minutes before scheduled meeting with Browning put an end to this route as well. Browning then turned to the Belgian company Fabrique Nationale (FN), which at this time (1901) produced first Browning-designed selfloading pistol (M1900) as fast as it could be made. FN management greeted Browning and his new gun with great enthusiasm, and in a short while FN produced the first FN Browning autoloading shotgun, known as Browning Auto 5, or A-5 in short. Browning himself ordered 10,000 A-5 shotguns from the first batch for sales and distribution in USA, and sold all 10 thousands in about a year. Following the introduction of the new, increased custom tariffs by US government, Browning found that it was economically not reasonable to import more A-5 guns into USA, so he pursued FN to release rights to make and sell Browning autoloading shotgun on US market to Remington Arms Co (FN originally had worldwide rights for manufacture of Auto 5). In 1905 Remington offered the Browning-designed autoloading shotgun as Model 11, and manufactured it without interruption until 1947, with well over 800,000 guns made. Between 1949 and 1968 Remington also produced an updated (lightened and streamlined) version of the Browning's design, known as Remington Model 11-48. The FN produced Browning Auto 5 shotguns continuously (with interruptions for German occupation during both World Wars) until 1999, making Auto-5 probably the most successful and longest-producing sporting shotgun in the history. Overall output of Auto-5 shotguns made and sold by FN (During WW2, A-5 shotguns were made for Browning Arms Co by Remington, and since mid-1970s Auto-5 shotguns were also produced for FN in Japan by Miroku, under FN license) over the century well exceeds two million guns (2,000,000th Auto-5 was produced in 1970). Total estimate of worldwide production numbers for this legendary Browning design is well over three million guns.
Copies and clones of the Auto-5 shotgun were also manufactured in Italy by Franchi and Breda, in USA by Savage and in USSR / Russia by TOZ, and by some other manufacturers around the world. Many Auto-5 guns, made many decades before, are still used for hunting and shooting today, but, as time goes, Browning Auto-5 shotguns increasingly become collector's pieces."
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Old September 26, 2009, 02:03 AM   #22
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I shot 24 of 25 traps with Rem 11 that I paid $60 for at a gunshow.
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Old September 26, 2009, 06:07 AM   #23
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I grew up with a Mod 11 12 gauge. Grandpa owned it, Dad owned it, now my brother has it. The old thing is heavy as an anchor, makes about 3 different sounds as the action cycles, kicks like a heavyweight boxer punching..... but it always works, never fails. The Mod 11 is a great shotgun for the money and doesnt get the respect it should.
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Old September 26, 2009, 07:08 AM   #24
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Impala has the correct Browning history here.

Where Scorch came up with that bogus "trivia", I can only wonder.


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Old September 26, 2009, 08:25 AM   #25
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Be sure to have a 'smith look at it first

I know of two different Rem 11s locally that would go full auto on ocassion. Very dangerous and scary.
I own the Savage equivalant shotgun made in the 1930s. It was my fathers' and has great sentimental value to me. The last time I had it to a gunsmith he told me it was time to make a wall hanger out of it. Although it was still in working order he recommended retiring it. It has seen a lot of use over the years. It now resides in the gunsafe. I did not want to take the chance of ruining a family heirloom or someone getting hurt if it did fail. I will pass it on to one of my sons someday.
Something that has sentimental value to you is near impossible to replace. If nothing else, enjoy it just for the memories. Jim
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