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Old September 22, 2009, 02:03 PM   #26
tyrajam
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If you have some tough or odd pieces, or just don't know what to do with a big hunk of your hog, make some pulled pork. Pack the meat in a crockpot-cubes, steaks, on the bone even-and cover to the rim with BBQ sauce. I make my own sauce, nothing like it. Cook for anywhere from 8-12 hourse stirring occasionally until the meat falls off the bone (if its on the bone) and falls apart. Stir it all up with the sauce and put a big ladel full on a hamburger bun-I'll tell you there is nothing like it!!
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Old September 22, 2009, 02:45 PM   #27
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Boar is boy pig... Truly wild hog will be a russian type. For the most part... "loose" pigs in the USA are "feral" domestic breeds.

As for well done... I agree... WELL DONE IS AN ABSOLUTE!!!!
STOP THE COOKING WHEN INTERNAL TEMP IS 5* OR SO BELOWWELL DONE TEMP (160 so stop at 155) PULL IT OFF AND LET REST 5-10 MINUTES... The internal will rise the 5 degrees to well... This will kill any and all cooties while not exceeding well done by maybe 5 or 10 total...
DISCLAIMER.... This is for large cuts... thin cuts need cooked to full...
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Old September 22, 2009, 08:55 PM   #28
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The poor mans vacuum, a bucket of water. Put your stuff into a ziplock bag, half seal, drop into the bucket to force out the air and finish sealing.

Freeze dried meat can often be recovered by steaming/slow cooking, a method favored by many for pork.
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Old September 23, 2009, 11:30 PM   #29
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Only difference between it and the ones that were killed and wraped at the grocery store so that people don't have to confront the fact that they were once living things is that the meat will have a BETTER flavor, less fat and not be pumped up on antibiotics and hormones.

Uh, not quite.

Farm raised pigs aren't pumped up with hormones, nor are they pumped up with antibiotics - regardless of what Wayne Pacelle and your vean friends at HSUS want to try to convince people of.

Also, store brought pork will have much less fat than on a boar. Its been bred out and is a very lean meat - hence "the other white meat." Wild pig has much more fat (which might give it flavor, might not).

One other HUGE difference. YOU HAVE TO OVERCOOK WILD PIG.

Domestic pigs are raised indoors primarily as a disease protection measure. There is no trichniosis in the US herd. Wild pigs (and unfortuntly, the pasture pigs that the "foodies" are infliting on us) all care trichina as well as a host of other diseases.

Which isn't to say its bad - only that it needs to be cooked very well.

DO NOT FOLLOW USDA COOKING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DOMESTIC PORK.

they do not apply to wild pig.
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Old September 24, 2009, 01:53 AM   #30
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How the heck do the honey baked people do it!?
LMBO! Once ya kill it, ya gotta - do something with it!
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Old September 24, 2009, 05:11 AM   #31
darkgael
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Smoking

Sgt:
Quote:
Smoker (found one about 2 hours away for $100 new, home-made looks nice)
Have you ever used a smoker to cook (which is what you are doing) meat or fish (or fruit, cheese or vegetables)?
If not, an important part of the process is "brining" the meat in a solution of kosher salt and water (or salt and sugar and water and.....). This adds time to the whole process as the meat has to sit in the brine for eight to twelve hours depending on the meat and cut.
Pete
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Old September 24, 2009, 06:16 AM   #32
hogdogs
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Farm raised pigs aren't pumped up with hormones, nor are they pumped up with antibiotics - regardless of what Wayne Pacelle and your vean friends at HSUS want to try to convince people of.
I agree that the hormones are not pumped in... However, there are hormones in the feed.
they only get pumped full of antibiotics if they get an infection.
They are, however, inoculated heavily to avoid the Trichinosis and brucellosis
among other cooties. The wild hogs can have these due to lack of inoculations.

Quote:
Also, store brought pork will have much less fat than on a boar. Its been bred out and is a very lean meat - hence "the other white meat." Wild pig has much more fat (which might give it flavor, might not).
100% wrong! I have raised hogs and hunted wild hogs... There is nothing farther from the fact than the above. I also have eaten my share of both wild and domestic swine. grease (molten fat) is obviously heavier, cut for cut, in domestic swine.
Quote:
One other HUGE difference. YOU HAVE TO OVERCOOK WILD PIG.
Pardon the pun but that is absolutely hogwash...
The best way to ruin wild pork is to cook it over the well done temp... Absolutely no bonafide reason to do so...
Quote:
Domestic pigs are raised indoors primarily as a disease protection measure. There is no trichniosis in the US herd. Wild pigs (and unfortuntly, the pasture pigs that the "foodies" are infliting on us) all care trichina as well as a host of other diseases.
Domestic hogs are raised indoors because hog tight fences cost more to build and maintain than a barn. The risk of indoor swine is one sick pig will infect the whole herd... BTDT!!!
There is no "tric" because of the aforementioned inoculations... The wild population will catch disease primarily from contact of infected untreated domestic swine...
Quote:
DO NOT FOLLOW USDA COOKING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DOMESTIC PORK.

they do not apply to wild pig.
Actually they apply to all swine! Any and all parasites and other cooties are well killed off BEFORE the well done temp is reached...
Please refrain from spewing forth untruths regarding any meats. I have fully researched the health of wild swine before letting my dogs sink their teeth in it to catch it or the teeth of my children following a well done internal cooked temp of 160*f...
Brent

Last edited by hogdogs; September 24, 2009 at 07:10 AM.
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Old September 24, 2009, 06:43 AM   #33
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The best way to ruin wild pork is to cook it over the well done temp... Absolutely no bonafide reason to do so...

Exactly. There is no reason to go over 160 degrees for an internal temp, just like domestic pork.

I'd feel pretty safe at 150 (trichinosis dies at 137) but the government recommends 160 so better safe than sorry.
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Old September 24, 2009, 07:43 AM   #34
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As for the leanness of pork... I concede that some breeds are designed for more or less fattiness. However, wild swine is leaner than any barnyard swine. NO MATTER THE BREED! A wild hog is always on the move, must fight to survive and feed is super important. Granted, a good mast crop will cause them to be fatter than other wild swine and those able to rob cattle, horse or other swine feed from farms will be as fat as a farm pig. But I doubt many here would disagree that a dead farm pig will float but most feral hogs sink like a rock when dead.
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Old September 24, 2009, 08:13 AM   #35
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Hotdogs is right. Wild hogs are most often lean or even very lean. As a result there is little or no bacon on the vast majority of wild hogs. The first wild hog pictured here is an anomaly, he was very fat.

The black hog was killed by me on Monday of this week. He has little fat: He also has little or no wild boar blood.
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Old September 24, 2009, 08:14 AM   #36
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This hog is lean:
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Old September 24, 2009, 11:05 AM   #37
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A hog that has good nutrition will have more fat than a hog that has poor nutrition but that fat isn't necessarily in the muscle tissue. Fat in muscle tissue is less dependent on nutrition and more dependent on genetics. Modern meat hogs have been bred to have a lower fat content in the muscle tissue than hogs had as little as twenty or thirty years ago. They might have more back fat than a traditional breed if they are better fed. But no matter how much they eat, the fat content in the muscle tissue won't change much. The important thing when cooking a pork chop or other cut from the pig is the fat content in the muscle tissue. In this respect, wild pigs are genetically superior to modern meat hogs as they have not been bred to have lean muscle tissue.
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Old September 24, 2009, 01:49 PM   #38
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Here's a link to a study comparing European wild boar to several breeds of domestic pigs (Polish Landrace and Duroc):
http://arch-anim-breed.fbn-dummersto...8/at08p359.pdf

In Table 2 (sorry, I tried to post Table 2 but it comes out jumbled) we find that wild boars, despite weighing about half of what the domestic hogs weighed, the wild boars had a higher intramuscular fat content.

This study was done in Europe and may or may not hold true for the feral hogs we have here but we do know that domestic pigs here have been bred to have leaner muscle tissue than their ancestors.
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Old September 24, 2009, 02:29 PM   #39
simonkenton
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Have you ever used a smoker to cook (which is what you are doing) meat or fish (or fruit, cheese or vegetables)?
If not, an important part of the process is "brining" the meat in a solution of kosher salt and water (or salt and sugar and water and.....). This adds time to the whole process as the meat has to sit in the brine for eight to twelve hours depending on the meat and cut.



I have smoked at least 50 shoulders and hams from wild hogs.
I have never heard of "brining" the meat. We never soaked the meat in salt water and our results were spectacularly good.
Love that mesquite wood.
Also, wild hog is absolutely leaner than store-bought pork, that is one reason I like wild hog so much.

As to antibiotics and pork, I had a job 30 years ago which involved going out into the country and interviewing farmers, and other people.
I spent a couple hours one day on a big hog farm in Georgia.
This was where they raised the hogs on concrete-floored pens. Big operation.
The farmer told me that the food was loaded with antibiotics.
He showed me one of the feed bags, sure enough antibiotics were listed as an ingredient. Might have been Tetracycline, I can't recall exactly.
This place had hundreds, if not thousands of hogs, and every time those hogs ate, they ate antibiotics.
The farmer told me that this was the industry standard.
Maybe practices have changed since the late seventies.
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Old September 24, 2009, 03:23 PM   #40
2damnold4this
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I have smoked at least 50 shoulders and hams from wild hogs.
I have never heard of "brining" the meat. We never soaked the meat in salt water and our results were spectacularly good.
Love that mesquite wood.


Just think how much better they'll be next time if you brine or marinade them. : )

Also, wild hog is absolutely leaner than store-bought pork, that is one reason I like wild hog so much.

The evidence seems to suggest that the muscle tissue of wild hogs has a higher fat content than the muscle tissue of domestic meat hogs, despite the wild boars being about half of the weight of the domestic pigs in the study.


Fatty tissue content, %(histochemically)
Wild boars 3.11
Polish landrace 2.37
Duroc 3.02


Edit to add: I'm sure a good dry smoked ham would be delicious. Do you use any rub or spices when you smoke the ham?

Last edited by 2damnold4this; September 24, 2009 at 04:12 PM.
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Old September 24, 2009, 03:57 PM   #41
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There was an article recently about a guy cleaning a wild hog with no gloves and getting a very serious disease some of them carry for the rest of his life with a bunch of expensive meds he will now have to take the rest of his life.

Guess the only suggestion I have is that if you clean one then be positively sure to wear some gloves and do not let any blood splatter onto your skin or wash it off immediately if it does.
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Old September 24, 2009, 04:31 PM   #42
hogdogs
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I don't hold any respect for a survey from europe... ESPECIALLY IF THEY COMPARE WILD TO A "DUROC"! A high number of my ferals are duroc or duroc crosses.
I will say that over cooking by even 5 or 10 degrees will be a dryer tougher piece compared to a domestic piece of meat. Intramuscular or outer I care less... I do know that a feral hog has about the same fat appearance amount as a deer...
I mean lean... I do know of a dozen or 2 hogs that looked fat like a domestic but that is after looking at literally a thousand or so dog caught or trapped pigs.
Brent
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Old September 24, 2009, 05:03 PM   #43
2damnold4this
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I don't hold any respect for a survey from europe... ESPECIALLY IF THEY COMPARE WILD TO A "DUROC"! A high number of my ferals are duroc or duroc crosses.

The duroc did have the closest intramuscular fat content to the wild boar they tested. 3.02% to 3.11%

It is fair to say that a study comparing European wild boars to domestic European hogs might not be representative of US feral hogs and US domestic hogs.
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Old September 25, 2009, 09:17 AM   #44
hogdogs
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It is fair to say that a study comparing European wild boars to domestic European hogs might not be representative of US feral hogs and US domestic hogs.
Yes sir... the above is very true...
Them studies are comparing the eurasian/russian swine which is a true wild hog.

What we have here is very rarely pure russian or even near pure... Ours are mainly domestic bloodlines. I have trapped or dogged a slough of pigs. While the young will be red with black stripes, they are black, red, belted, or tri-color... heck even got a few pink/white ones.
I feel that the spanish blood (black), duroc, hampshire are heaviest in the panhandle as well as eastern/central florida. I can't speak for the whole nation though...
Brent
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Old September 25, 2009, 09:33 AM   #45
darkgael
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brine

Quote:
I have smoked at least 50 shoulders and hams from wild hogs.
I have never heard of "brining" the meat. We never soaked the meat in salt water and our results were spectacularly good.
Simon: Yeah. I figured when I wrote that that there was probably someone who did not include brining in the process.
All I know about smoking comes from two sources - one is the instruction book that came with my little commercial smoker; it gave very specific instructions about brining before smoking. The other is from a fellow I know who smokes meat regularly at a commercial level (two smokers - one is a walkin house in his yard and the other is a one ton traveling arrangement on a trailer that allows him to smoke maybe thirty shoulders at a time. He brines his meats before he smokes them.
Any how - that's the source of my info. I'll have to inquire more about smoking without the brining since you have had such success with that.
Pete
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Old September 25, 2009, 09:42 AM   #46
hogdogs
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If I were "cold" smoking to impart flavor I would likely brine. But smoking to cook, I do not brine as it is just too salty too me. I quit smoking meat many years ago as it is just too slow for me. I do add some wet wood chips for flavor though.
Brent
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Old September 25, 2009, 10:30 AM   #47
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Quote:
Farm raised pigs aren't pumped up with hormones, nor are they pumped up with antibiotics - regardless of what Wayne Pacelle and your vean friends at HSUS want to try to convince people of.

I agree that the hormones are not pumped in... However, there are hormones in the feed.
they only get pumped full of antibiotics if they get an infection.
They are, however, inoculated heavily to avoid the Trichinosis and brucellosis
among other cooties. The wild hogs can have these due to lack of inoculations.


Quote:
Also, store brought pork will have much less fat than on a boar. Its been bred out and is a very lean meat - hence "the other white meat." Wild pig has much more fat (which might give it flavor, might not).

100% wrong! I have raised hogs and hunted wild hogs... There is nothing farther from the fact than the above. I also have eaten my share of both wild and domestic swine. grease (molten fat) is obviously heavier, cut for cut, in domestic swine.

Quote:
One other HUGE difference. YOU HAVE TO OVERCOOK WILD PIG.

Pardon the pun but that is absolutely hogwash...
The best way to ruin wild pork is to cook it over the well done temp... Absolutely no bonafide reason to do so...

Quote:
Domestic pigs are raised indoors primarily as a disease protection measure. There is no trichniosis in the US herd. Wild pigs (and unfortuntly, the pasture pigs that the "foodies" are infliting on us) all care trichina as well as a host of other diseases.

Domestic hogs are raised indoors because hog tight fences cost more to build and maintain than a barn. The risk of indoor swine is one sick pig will infect the whole herd... BTDT!!!
There is no "tric" because of the aforementioned inoculations... The wild population will catch disease primarily from contact of infected untreated domestic swine...

Quote:
DO NOT FOLLOW USDA COOKING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DOMESTIC PORK.

they do not apply to wild pig.

Actually they apply to all swine! Any and all parasites and other cooties are well killed off BEFORE the well done temp is reached...
Please refrain from spewing forth untruths regarding any meats. I have fully researched the health of wild swine before letting my dogs sink their teeth in it to catch it or the teeth of my children following a well done internal cooked temp of 160*f...
Brent
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Old September 28, 2009, 02:41 PM   #48
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Ok, sorry to revive this, as I have gotten so many great replies but a co-worker (we call him pig killer around here) informed me that wrapping pig in aluminum foil can cause botchilism....which I know is pretty deadly....and to throw away all of the meat I have.

Is that true? I know i shouldn't have stored the meat in aluminum foil but I figured it was ok for now (besides freezer burn). So far I've cooked shoulder, back strap, and crock-potted some of the ham meat in bbq sauce. Each dish has been delicious.

Will I get botchilism if I continue to store my swine in a freezer wrapped in aluminum foil? This just sounds crazy asking.....but hey I'm nervous now so don't ridicule.
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Old September 28, 2009, 03:28 PM   #49
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I say no you can't, but I wouldn't trust internet sources for possible life and death information. Ask your local Butcher Doctor or FFA/County Co-Op field agent.
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Old September 28, 2009, 04:38 PM   #50
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I don't think you have to worry if the meat is frozen.
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