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Old July 11, 2009, 04:05 PM   #51
JAYBIRD78
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The big problem any more is that people dont know how to keep their mouth shut. Shoot, shovel, shhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. End of problem.
+1 to this. I'm not a hunter and I don't usually go around killing animals. However on occasion I have "taken care of" some pests within populated areas.

Just be smart about it, if your in town consider using shorts or subsonic 22s or air rifle. Don't be aiming at your pests with the neighbors kids playing in the background.

Hell, I have an aunt who was damn near anti gun until she had some coons in her decorative pond. She still has a air rifle of mine, now that I think about it.

Good luck.
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Old July 11, 2009, 04:06 PM   #52
Willie Lowman
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I know it is a crazy thought, but maybe dog food.....
That's how I do it. Put a can of Alpo or something on a paper plate and go sit behind my AR-15. 55gr. JHPs kill dogs dead.

I will say that I don't put the bait out till I know the dog I want to kill is near my house. I don't go out of my way to get 'em. The dog food just makes them stand still long enough to get a clean shot.
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Old July 11, 2009, 04:53 PM   #53
thallub
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People will drive right past an animal shelter/dog pound to throw away the unwanted bow-wow. That generally leads to a dead dog, whether by starvation or a bullet.

Same thing happens in this part of OK. Lots of dogs get turned loose here to hassle livestock, pets and game. All but the big mean ones soon become coyote food. The big ones get shot pretty quick.
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Old July 11, 2009, 06:07 PM   #54
Nnobby45
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I'm not making excuses for dogs running loose, but some good pets can become vicious when running with other dogs. Not disimilar with what happens when a group of teens get together and get destructive even though, as individuals, they seem like good kids.

Chances are that each dog is someone's pet and "such a good dog" when at home curled up on the couch.

Not saying that true feral dogs in packs don't exist, or that delinquent pets can't be just as destructive.
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Old July 11, 2009, 06:49 PM   #55
hardluk1
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Daryl at this point i don't give a damnd what you believe. Mutt, coyote or mix. I will beleive a state pay'd bio over your intuition. I am also the only person i know that has killed coyotes, at least they looked like the real thing, with a bow on several hunting trips in georgia for deer. But maybe a better get tested results. jeeesss I should have took pictures.
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Old July 12, 2009, 07:03 AM   #56
Nanuk
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I used to hunt Feral dogs in the Army. They are fairly easy to find, in that, they roam on the roads and trails (path of least resistance). A good 223 is plenty, I use a 55 Nosler BT on anything up the big deer we have here.
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Old July 12, 2009, 07:56 AM   #57
Daryl
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Hardpuk,

Believe whatever the flip you want; it's no skin off my back.

You're as entitled to repeat foolish BS as the next fella is.

You want to make your point? Show me a picture of a coy-dog from the wild. Better yet, maybe a picture of a pack of them? I'm rather curious as to what one looks like. Dogs and coyotes are everywhere these days, so it's not like I'm asking for a picture of bigfoot. If coyotes breed with dogs, it shouldn't be too hard to find several pictures, right? Of course, proof that it has coyote blood in it would strengthen your argument.

I guarantee I've shot more with a rifle than you have with a bow...or anything else in georgia.

Seriously, I've never even seen a picture of one that could be proven to be a coy-dog. Hunters kill coyotes and post the pictures on the 'net pretty frequently. Why can't I find a good picture of a proven coy-dog?

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Old July 12, 2009, 08:26 AM   #58
fineredmist
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Feral dogs can be a serious problem. I was in the Army back in the 60s and some bases had real problems with the "dogs left behind" by servicemen being sent overseas. Packs of ferals would raid trash barrels in housing areas and attack pets left outdoors. It got to the point where MP patrols were issued shotguns to take care of the problem. The dead ferals were taken to the base Vet for examination and it was not uncommon to find some of them were rabid. The City of Hartford Ct. had the same problem with feral dogs some 20 years back and animal control trapped and "disposed" of them.
A pack of hungry feral dogs is nothing to be taken lightly, they are very dangerous.
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Old July 12, 2009, 08:39 AM   #59
Art Eatman
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Knock off the personal stuff. I find it to be underwhelming.

The only coy-dogs of which I know first-hand had coyote sires. Momma was a house dog. The pups were locally in demand as yard-guards. But this was just two litters, and maybe 20 years back.

What we've found, these last 30 or so years, is that occasionally a group of three or four coyotes will come past a house where there is a yard dog. If the yard dog is lured out by the smell of a bitch in heat, shame on him; it's a one-time event. I doubt that anybody knows whether this is deliberate or "just happens", but it's been written about for over a hundred years.
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Old July 12, 2009, 09:23 AM   #60
roy reali
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Hougars

Coy-dogs are not a problem here, we have to worry about Hougars. They are a cross between house cats and wild cougars, hence the name, Hougars. Fortunately our Badgers haven't taken to fornicating with any of our domestic animals yet! Could you imagine what a Bamster would look like!!!
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Old July 12, 2009, 09:35 AM   #61
treg
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Several of the dogs we've had to deal with around here were the result of townies that move out and let thier dogs roam, "like they did in the wild" or "just like nature intended". If the owner is known or a collar with ID is present the prefered method is to catch them and have the county take them to the pound - 50 miles away. The result is an educated (less ignorant) owner that had to spend time and money to retrieve thier dog, pay fines and veterinary costs. Being how this is both fun and effective I have plans and materials for a large towable live trap, should be done by fall.
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Old July 12, 2009, 10:39 AM   #62
hardluk1
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Art Eatman atleast one guy around here knows coy-dogs are real to some extent even if only a regional area. Try to control the bs till i find someone that closed minded. sorry if your offended
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Old July 12, 2009, 12:54 PM   #63
Daryl
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The only coy-dogs of which I know first-hand had coyote sires. Momma was a house dog. The pups were locally in demand as yard-guards. But this was just two litters, and maybe 20 years back.

What we've found, these last 30 or so years, is that occasionally a group of three or four coyotes will come past a house where there is a yard dog. If the yard dog is lured out by the smell of a bitch in heat, shame on him; it's a one-time event. I doubt that anybody knows whether this is deliberate or "just happens", but it's been written about for over a hundred years.
Art,

If you read over my posts, this goes right along with what I said. I have serious doubts about a bitch coyote letting a dog breed her. I'm sure it can happen, but it's almighty rare.

A litter of dog pups sired by a male coyote is more likely, yet still very rare. They're generally raised/dealt with in captivity by a dog as the mother, and aren't the problem many folks like to believe. They're usually about half wild and tend to be shy, but they aren't necessarily agressive unless cornered. In fact, some reports are that they don't make good watch dogs because they don't bark much, and tend to hide rather than show aggression towards an intruder.

I've no doubt that it can and has happened, but I also know it's very rare in the wild. "Packs of coy-dogs" rampaging an area is a nearly non-existent concern.

I've spent a lot of time over many years in the outdoors, and my primary focus over much of that time afield has been hunting coyotes. When you spend that much time interested in a critter and their habits, you invariably learn a bit about them. I've never in my life seen anything resembling a coy-dog in the wild. I once knew of a litter of pups that I suspected might have been sired by a coyote, but that was never checked to prove it one way or the other. The litter was mothered by a captive mutt that was very friendly, and the pups were never (as far as I know) tamed to the point of becoming decent pets.

BUT, they were raised in captivity, were not a problem in the wild, and never showed any aggression towards a person that I'm aware of. They'd hide rather than show any aggression at all.

As I've said over and over, I've no doubt it's possible, and I'm even fairly sure it's happened in the wild, but it's mighty rare.

Rare enough, in fact, that any threat they might pose would seem non-existent to the general public.

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Old July 12, 2009, 01:11 PM   #64
hogdogs
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This is not only a "Coy-Dog" but a damn fine hog dog! I copied the pic without permission but doubt the guy would mind. Florida bred and born.

As for my chained out dogs, I am not ignorant! If I had the many thousands of dollars to build an escape proof kennel, I surely would. If my bulldogs were able to escape, it would be a bad situation and someone would be posting a "How to hunt feral dogs" thread about them.
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Old July 12, 2009, 01:41 PM   #65
barnetmill
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coydogs

Interbreeding between closely related canines occurs. I do not know how often. Below is part of an article that is based up one from Science Magazine.

"By Thomas H. Maugh II

Los Angeles Times

Black wolves and coyotes, often the villains of cartoons and children's fairy tales, apparently inherited their color from a much more warm and fuzzy animal: the dog.

True, dogs are descended from wolves, but research Friday in the journal Science indicates black fur was bred into dogs by humans and inadvertently introduced into the wild species.

The trait shows up in the wild primarily in North America, and it was probably brought to the continent about 15,000 years ago, when the first immigrants crossed over the Bering land bridge, bringing their dogs along.

That the mutation has stayed in the wild population for so long suggests it is beneficial in some way."

I have seen what I believe was a black coyote at the former Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (35,000 acres a little southwest of Chicago) a few years ago. The canine reminded me of some dog-wolf hybrids except for the very small size. Coyotes that I saw in Kansas were grey.
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Old July 12, 2009, 03:44 PM   #66
hogdogs
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And the only dogs I keep on chains are work dogs. The ones I consider to be tools. I have the 4 indoor pet dogs as well. But the work dogs are not something I wish to have the same level of affection for as they may end up cut down dead by a hog on any hunt.
The wife and daughter don't need to be falling love the same for them as they do the pets as it will cause me strife from them when the dogs get hurt or killed.
Brent
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Old July 12, 2009, 04:03 PM   #67
cornbush
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I guess I'm igronant too, my yard in Idaho wasn't fenced and I didn't own the place. So I kept my MUTT on a chain, had shelter, food, and water too. But I guess maybe we just don't have the brain power to take care of an animal Brent! We also regularly shot strays, and problem dogs, collar or not. If my dog got out and caused a problem I wouldn't hold it against anyone to do the same.

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Old July 12, 2009, 11:26 PM   #68
Dallas Jack
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I hunt in the Central Texas area. Goats are a big form of income there and the ranchers keep dogs to guard their goats. Usually Great Pyrenees. If they find another dog on their property that they do not reconize (another ranchers dog) the dog is shot collar or not. If they see another ranchers dog on their property they will call the rancher. (the first time) They just can not afford the loses caused by dogs and coyotes.

When hunting season starts, the hunters are likely to shoot any dog they see. The herd dogs generally stay with the goats and do not roam the woods. Of course there would not be a dog (or cat) problem if people didn't come from town and drop them off.

Feral dogs (and cats) are just not tolerated there. The general rule (as I've heard it) in ranching country is to shoot all feral dogs (and all cats) and be done with it.

On a side note, I live in the suburbs outside of Dallas. I keep a live trap baited in my back yard because of racoons. So far I've caught as many stray cats as I have coons. (5 each and 1 possum) They all go the the animal control folks never to be seen again. I've about cleaned the neiborhood of stray cats.
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Old July 13, 2009, 08:44 PM   #69
cornbush
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When I lived in Idaho the sheep hearders left a few dogs behind every year. They were all great pyrenese, they were aggressive and we shot every one we saw after we knew the hearders had pulled out. There have been some heated discussions on this topic in the past, everyone has a different opinion about "the poor dog left behind", but I think if they saw them work over a deer or two they would change their mind.
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Old July 20, 2009, 03:02 AM   #70
Peptobismol9
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If you live in a neighborhood, use something with high fragmentation, so its not likley to ricochet. Have you ever heard of Varmint Grenades? If you live in the woods, or away from a lot of people, shotguns are always a great way to eliminate the problem. If you want to be sure you get 'em, 3-inch 12 gauge rounds.
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