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Old July 13, 2009, 03:14 AM   #51
cloud8a
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"dude no offense but i just read you talking about the money to get one. put it on a credit card or something...be responsible about it."

I do not use credit cards. I spend the money I earn. I cannot afford to pay interest on money that is borrowed. I believe one can be safe and smart without having to spend money that is not mine.
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Old July 24, 2009, 07:21 AM   #52
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Determining priorities......

Quote:
"right now I do not have the money to buy a safe"
Quote:
"Until I get the dough to purchase a more efficient safe..."
Quote:
"(leaving for a Seattle vacation Friday and all funds going for that)"

Not to be harassing, but this seems a little contradictory.

I guess it's a matter of where you place greater importance.
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Old July 24, 2009, 12:58 PM   #53
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We might be going the wrong direction with this problem. I'm a retired LEO and had a loaded gun in the holster hung on the bed post every night for 25 years. I raised one son. All the other cops I knew with families did the same thing as far as I know. I never heard of an accident and the Department numbered over seven thousand.

First, remove all curiosity about the gun. Let them handle it whenever they want, unloaded of course. Let them ask qusetions but in the end show the kids what it can do. Let them shoot it if they are old enough. When the children are very little and don't understand, just keep it out of reach. You have dangerous knives in the kitchen but don't put them under lock and key.
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Old July 24, 2009, 01:39 PM   #54
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"Quote Spade Cooley:
We might be going the wrong direction with this problem. I'm a retired LEO and had a loaded gun in the holster hung on the bed post every night for 25 years. I raised one son. All the other cops I knew with families did the same thing as far as I know. I never heard of an accident and the Department numbered over seven thousand.

First, remove all curiosity about the gun. Let them handle it whenever they want, unloaded of course. Let them ask qusetions but in the end show the kids what it can do. Let them shoot it if they are old enough. When the children are very little and don't understand, just keep it out of reach. You have dangerous knives in the kitchen but don't put them under lock and key. "

Thats the way my brother & I were raised as well as my 3 children
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Old July 24, 2009, 01:44 PM   #55
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Quote:
We might be going the wrong direction with this problem. I'm a retired LEO and had a loaded gun in the holster hung on the bed post every night for 25 years. I raised one son. All the other cops I knew with families did the same thing as far as I know. I never heard of an accident and the Department numbered over seven thousand.

First, remove all curiosity about the gun. Let them handle it whenever they want, unloaded of course. Let them ask qusetions but in the end show the kids what it can do. Let them shoot it if they are old enough. When the children are very little and don't understand, just keep it out of reach. You have dangerous knives in the kitchen but don't put them under lock and key.
I sympathize with your view, but here in CT, safe storage laws require guns to be locked in some way if you have kids in the house.
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Old July 24, 2009, 07:56 PM   #56
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Layered defense

We have raised 5 kids, youngest had 40th birthday recently. I've been a shooter since 1951, an NRA Instructor of one sort or another since 1955. You never know what kids will do, or not do. The best you can do is to establish good safe habits in them, and have a "layered defense," not just against bad guys, but against your own good kids. Teach "Eddie Eagle" to them when they are young. Teach the basics of safe shooting, and then have another qualified person, NOT YOU, instruct them further on safe handling and accurate shooting. Lock away the guns and the ammo. Have just one, 01, gun available for immediate home defense ... and have it so secured that only you or your spouse can get it ... and not even your spouse, if not trained and experienced in safe gun handling in emergency situations.

I'm also a retired EMT. Ran a call to the home of a friend, a well known and widely respected senior police official. His teen age daughter shot herself with his .357, in her bedroom, while her parents and a guest were talking in the living room. No alcohol or drugs involved. Carrying their child out of the house was one of the hardest things I ever did.

When you protect your home and family from evil doers, protect your family from your firearms.
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Old July 24, 2009, 08:26 PM   #57
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Quote:
First, remove all curiosity about the gun.
THAT'S the first step

Take them shooting and show them what it can do
TEACH them gun safety
I raised two boys - as soon as they were old enough, I took them shooting and taught them gun safety. The only gun out of the safe was the revolver in the nightstand and it was loaded. There was NEVER an issue. They knew to keep their friends out of our bedroom. They knew they would never go shooting or hunting again if they touched that gun (home invasion notwithstanding).. They're now grown and out of the house.

EDUCATE, EDUCATE, EDUCATE

Take the mystery out and it becomes no different than any other ordinary thing in the house
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Old July 25, 2009, 07:43 AM   #58
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I believe in gun safes to protect my guns. But I always have one loaded firearm or more around the house. They are no good to you in an emergency unless you can get to them quickly.

We have a widow women down the road. We live in the country along a river and the few policemen we have are far away if there at all. The widow called me one evening telling me she had a burglar in her garage. I called another male neighbor to back me up as I went to check it out. I ended up taking care of the problem alone because it took my back up neighbor at least ten minutes to get dressed and go to her house.

By that time I had checked it out alone and found it was only a racoon getting into the cat food stored in the garage. My neighbor with the gun locked up was useless and would be an excellent victim for someone breaking into his home. A gun locked up will not protect you and your family.
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Old July 26, 2009, 10:56 PM   #59
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No kids in my house. This is my solution for my HD shotgun. The problem with this set up is the gun can still be racked and fired. When kids come over, for a party for example, all the guns go in the safe. My point is there always seems to be some compromise between access and safety.
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Old July 27, 2009, 01:19 AM   #60
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Quote:
there always seems to be some compromise between access and safety.
True that.
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Old July 28, 2009, 06:48 AM   #61
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If you have all your guns under lock and key during the night and someone has broken in, just call yourself a victim.

When you are in the privacy of your own home, you make the rules and decide what the law is. Never mind about the liberal state you live in.

If you own more than one gun, you need to purchase some kind of a gun safe in order to guard against burglars. Don't buy another gun until you buy one.
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Old July 28, 2009, 10:38 AM   #62
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Destroyerman762 ~

Well-written, heartbreaking post.

Worth reading again, guys.

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Old July 28, 2009, 11:04 AM   #63
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Raised three sons with guns all over the house. Trained them and took the curiosity away by taking them to the range when they were young. They didn't like the recoil. Also took all the guns out every three months with them and they handled and asked questions freely. They are now 33, 29, and 26 and they own their own guns.
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Old July 28, 2009, 12:23 PM   #64
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Constant Vigilance

Responsible gun ownership does indeed mean protecting your guns - all of them - from unauthorized access. Not only does this prevent tragedy within the family, but theft is deterred and your peace of mind is enhanced. Absolutely get a safe. (My wife, who really dislikes guns, was visibly pleased when i brought my safe home). More than one, if you need long gun storage as well as immediate handgun access. Even a cheap safe is a better strategy than hoping the closet shelf is high enough. Kids ALWAYS know what's in their parent's bedrooms, closets, etc. - it's their job - and they know how to climb.

Educate and train your kids - absolutely. Teach them to shoot and to have proper respect for firearms. But since you can't train all their friends, or even hope to control any teenager's raging emotions and moods, you have to store your firearms securely. Always. No exceptions. If not on your person, it needs to be locked up. Develop a routine and follow it exactly, every time. If you go to work in the morning and suddenly remember you left your pistol in the nightstand or forgot to lock the safe, it may already be too late. Go back home immediately and secure it, then develop a better plan. Taking a shower? Lock the door, or lock up your pistol first.

Once is all that is required for tragedy to strike and destroy your family or someone else's. As if the certainty of having your life unravel from an unthinkable tragedy wasn't enough reason, you could also get to enjoy the multiple pleasures of financial ruin, permanent loss of firearm ownership, and possibly incarceration and a cellmate named Tiny who really likes you a lot. :barf: It's really the flip side of why we carry - we carry because we can never know when the fates will select us for a robbery/carjack/home invasion - right? So, store your guns safely because you never know when the critical test will come -and the stakes are too high if you lose.

Read Destroyerman's post if you need any further incentive, and Ric From Richmond's. Be safe.
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Old July 29, 2009, 01:12 AM   #65
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I really like the digital handgun safe I got. I drilled holes through the bottom, and permanently bolted it to the very heavy nightstand next to my bed. It has a six digit combo, and now that I purposely did the combo, over and over...and over...in the dark,... with my eyes closed,... left handed,.... laying in bed,... standing up...etc etc...all to ingrain the combo into my muscle memory, it takes me less than a second to open it up and have my 9mm fully loaded with Golden Sabers in my hand plus an extra clip (or even my .38 special if so inclined) in my waistband for backup. Solved a lot of problems for me. If the gun isn't on my person, it is in the box.
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Old July 29, 2009, 07:26 AM   #66
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Many of us are responsible and will take steps to secure firearms in our own homes, yet one out of every two homes in America has a gun in it. Think of the dumbest guy you know - chances are good he has a gun in his home. Do your kids play with his kids?

I worry less about gun accidents in my home than I do elsewhere. My guns are locked up in a big honken' safe. I've got a SD gun that is secured in a gun vault that I can get to pretty fast, but I've got a GSD that can get to any intruder waaaaaay faster than I can set up a defensive posture.



No one, repeat, no one is getting up those stairs past the dog.

The wisdom is these threads is that it makes us think not only of training (securing firearms, tactics, etc.), but it makes us think of education. You have to teach your kids what to do when they encounter a firearm. Not "if" but "when". You can't be with your kids 100% of the time - they are going to see things at a neighbors' house that you probably wouldn't want them to see at home - so you need to teach them right/wrong and how to respond. My youngest is 9, but at 5, all the kids knew to Stop, Don't Touch, Leave the Area, Tell an Adult.

We all know these things - it's the dumb guy that lives next door that you need to be worried about. The only thing you can do is teach your kids how to respond when they encounter guns, creepy people, etc.

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Old September 3, 2009, 08:24 AM   #67
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I will echo the thoughts of many who have posted. If you cannot/will not afford to buy a quick access safe such as a gunvault with kids in the house, I believe you cannot afford to have loaded firearms. It only takes 1 time for everyone's life to change. I have the Gunvault deluxe and I love it. Mine has the backup power adapter in case the batteries run out. I have taken the back up key and stored it outside my home...it will lockout anyone putting in repeated wrong codes and the model I have even has a motion alarm if you rattle it around. I bought it before I bought my first handgun. Stay safe.
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Old September 3, 2009, 08:48 AM   #68
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+1 with DANBREW

Hi All,
I have a 10 YO boy, and many times there are several of his friends that are playing around the house.
Therefore, all my guns are either locked in a safe (two of them are with digital keypads, in different rooms, which offer me quick access to a firearm within seconds whever I am in the house) or in a holster on my body.

At night there is one loaded gun on the table next to me.

My boy has been shooting since age 8, can recite the safety rules in 2 languages ( the golden 4 + a few more that I have) and when he plays with toy guns, he keeps his finger off the trigger.

Even so, he is still a 10 YO boy, and there is no way that I will leave a firearm within his reach.

I do realize that in the US safes are not compulsory, but the peace of mind is worth every cent.

Danbrew, you are aboslutely right, dogs are not only great companions , but a good dog will alert you to the fact that strangers are close long before they are at your door, and many will defend you with their lives.

Brgds,

Danny
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Old September 8, 2009, 09:20 PM   #69
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This has been a great thread

This has been a great thread. I am a new dad (first one) and have been contemplating on what to do/buy for my SD pistol.

I really like the idea of those simplex mechanical locks. All my other firearms are locked in a RSC in the basement that sank in a boating accident. I think I'm going to call a buddy of mine also that has a 2 yr old and mention this. I'm 99% sure his are just hidden and unloaded.

Be safe
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Old September 10, 2009, 07:13 AM   #70
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Love to see what you guys think about my solution and if it is good enough.

I have a biometric safe bolted to the bottom of my nightstand, in the safe I keep my handgun and all the keys to my other gun locks. The other handgun and the shotgun are in the closet with a cable lock and trigger lock respectively. The safe accepts only mine and my wife's thumbs and the only key is worn around my neck.
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Old September 10, 2009, 12:05 PM   #71
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BCeagle, that sounds solid to me. I wonder if any of the more experienced guys here can think of a hole?
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Old September 10, 2009, 12:20 PM   #72
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^-----

if you cut your thumb and it was greasy from the antibiotic and sticky from the band-aid
if your arm/hand was in a cast.

the post says 'thumbs', plural so perhaps it reads all 4?

a BHP with a mag interlock was when my kids were growing up and by default, still is my bedside gun.
never read of or heard of one failing: it is my choice to trust the mechanical interlock.
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Old September 10, 2009, 09:14 PM   #73
Destroyerman762
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Thumbprint not great idea.

Sounds good, if equipment reliable, keeps BGs out, lets GGs in. ... but:

I had some recent experience with a fingerprint reading system. Not a safe, but a GPS/HandHeldComputer/digital radio transmitter/receiver. Used by the US Census Bureau in the "pre-Census" to locate all the dwellings in the USA.

It had a digital ID system, read your fingerprint before it would let you do anything.

We were group trained on how to use the wondrous widget, and the first part of training was how to register our fingerprints in it, and which fingers to use.

We could use any fingers on any hand, only needed one to open but had to register two and AVOID USING THUMB OR INDEX FINGER. Strongly suggested, but not mandatory. Why? They were the two fingers most likely to be grungy, most likely to be injured (burns, cuts, broken). I think most of us used the signaling or emotional digit of our strong hand for our primary use, and the same or a different finger on the weak hand for secondary use.

Unfortunately, we had to turn in our widgets when we completed our work.
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Old September 10, 2009, 09:44 PM   #74
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My wife and I have one of these:



... and a 2-yr-old boy at home. Works great. Our only complaint is that occasionally it doesn't read my wife's fingerprint just right. I do worry a little that when it really counts, that she won't be able to get in (you have to get your finger on there exactly right). But we've decided that the benefits outweigh the drawbacks (for now).

Bonus: it's easy to hide behind a painting or whatnot. Here's the website: http://www.securelogiconline.com/ind...cts/wall-vault
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Old September 10, 2009, 10:14 PM   #75
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The one for pistolds, here looks practical:

http://gunracks.tylerrose.com/
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