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Old May 4, 2009, 09:43 PM   #1
.357 mag
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wolf spring kit

How hard is it it install a spring kit on my 66-2. By no means am I a monkey, but I'm not a rocket specialist either.
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Old May 4, 2009, 09:52 PM   #2
postal1911
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its actually very easy, ive done it many times
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Old May 4, 2009, 09:56 PM   #3
rjrivero
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Wolff Springs......Easy to install, and you'll like what it does to your trigger.

Make sure you test fire it on a bunch of your personal carry ammo. Lighter springs can sometimes cause light strikes.
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Old May 5, 2009, 07:09 AM   #4
D-Ric902
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Go to youtube and search "gunsmithing"
Mr. Potterfield did some great videos on changing spring kits. I just put a Wolff kit in my 586 and it was a lot easier after watching someone do it.
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Old May 5, 2009, 12:12 PM   #5
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It's easy. I've installed several. When you first open the gun - STOP! Take a long, careful look at where everything goes. Make a sketch if you need to. Study how things come apart. Now, change out the springs. Watch that trigger rebound spring - it'll go SPROING on ya! That's all there is to it.
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Old May 5, 2009, 12:54 PM   #6
LUPUS
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I think the link below will be pretty helpful for you, Regards.


http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=397027
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Old May 5, 2009, 04:27 PM   #7
.357 mag
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Thanks. I don't carry or hunt with this gun just targets and fun. I did watch the larry videos. It looked easy, just making sure.

.357
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Old May 5, 2009, 08:36 PM   #8
.357 mag
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Ordered today. Can't wait. Will post when done.

Thanks again
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Old May 6, 2009, 08:53 AM   #9
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Where did you order them from?
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Old May 6, 2009, 09:24 PM   #10
.357 mag
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midwayusa
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Old May 8, 2009, 09:18 PM   #11
.357 mag
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DONE! No problem at all. It took me about 5 minutes. I went ahead and took apart all the inters to, (first time) and it wasn't that bad. Anyway, I used the 13Lb spring and The mainspring. The single action I can see a big differance. Super Light!! Double action I don't think it changed the poundage ( that I can feel) but it is more smooth by a long shot. I wish I had a trigger weight. Anyway, well worth the 20 bucks.

Thanks for all your help.

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Old May 9, 2009, 12:10 PM   #12
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Make sure you test fire it with your favorite ammo. I have installed several of the Wolff spring kits (good choice by the way), and usually had my best luck with reliability on the 14lb spring. Just make sure it reliably returns your trigger and that it it hit the primer with sufficient force to pop it all the time. Some of the primers out there don't like the light springs, and you can get inconsistent ignition (as in sometimes boom, sometimes no boom).
Have fun, shoot well.
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Old May 11, 2009, 08:56 PM   #13
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range report

I'm back from the range. I fired 200 reloads of 38 and 357 with Winchester primers and had zero FTF. My DA groups have gotten smaller and I'm shooting back further. I stayed with the 13 pound spring and all is good.

Thanks to everyone who helped.

.357
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Old May 11, 2009, 08:57 PM   #14
Mike Irwin
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It's so easy a monkey can do it, so you should be fine.

edit:

Oh, maybe this monkey should have read the entire thread before replying...
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Old May 13, 2009, 07:25 AM   #15
philthephlier
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Wolf Ribbed Leaf Springs

If you have a leaf spring polish it, especially along the edges. These springs are stamped from spring steel stock and the dies leave the edges of the spring rough. Polish them smooth with emery paper until the rough edges are gone and finish to 400 or even 600 grit. A great spring will get even better if you will take the 20 minutes or so to do this.
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Old May 13, 2009, 09:36 AM   #16
.357 mag
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good advice.
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Old May 13, 2009, 10:19 AM   #17
Mike Irwin
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"Polish them smooth with emery paper until the rough edges are gone and finish to 400 or even 600 grit. A great spring will get even better if you will take the 20 minutes or so to do this."


Interesting, this is the first time I have ever heard of this.

What does it do, specifically?
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Old May 13, 2009, 10:38 AM   #18
philthephlier
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Polishing springs

Springs are very interesting marvels. Somebody discovered long ago, probably in the muzzleloading era before the advent of coil springs that a spring that is polished to remove all file and or machine tool marks will be a much smoother spring. Originally it was probably done to reduce spring breakage because any deep scratches from a file left near the major bends of a leaf spring will almost always result in a broken spring eventually. Might last a while but if it is gonna break it will break right on the file mark. Springs don't like localized stresses. And polishing greatly reduces these and spreads the tension evenly throughout the spring. A polished spring is smoother and faster and as a result the hammer fall is faster with less tension of the strain screw applied to the spring and that translates to lighter single action cocking effort and lighter double action trigger pull. If you want to take the time polish the entire spring. You just might be amazed at the difference.
Many competition guns will have polished springs as part of the tuning process.
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Old May 13, 2009, 12:18 PM   #19
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Makes sense.

I think I've got a project for this weekend.
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Old May 13, 2009, 03:44 PM   #20
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me too. Thanks a lot, I had plans to.
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Old May 13, 2009, 07:37 PM   #21
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I doubt that polishing the edges makes the pull smoother fo the reasons you say. It does relieve stress from deep marks, and this is a good thing. The reason it feels smoother, is that you have actually reduced the size of the spring-making it weaker.
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Old May 14, 2009, 01:03 PM   #22
philthephlier
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Long experience with polished springs

I doubt that polishing the edges makes the pull smoother fo the reasons you say. It does relieve stress from deep marks, and this is a good thing. The reason it feels smoother, is that you have actually reduced the size of the spring-making it weaker.

I get the impression that you doubt a polished spring is a more efficient (smoother acting) spring. I have been a muzzleloading gunbuilder for 35 years and it is not just a matter of the spring getting lighter and thereby feeling smoother. Polishing a high quality spring like a Wolff removes very little metal,
probably .003" to clean up the marks left by the stamping die. Granted when the job is done the spring has less metal and is very slightly lighter, but experts
with more experience than I have touted the benefits of spring polishing for a very long time.
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Old May 14, 2009, 05:14 PM   #23
Bill DeShivs
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A spring either bends or it doesn't. It can't really bend "smoother."
A properly made spring should be smoothly finished to relieve stress points, and because that is just the way to make fine parts.
And, BTW- I have been making springs for about 35 years.
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Last edited by Bill DeShivs; May 14, 2009 at 07:50 PM.
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Old May 14, 2009, 05:43 PM   #24
Casimer
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What's 'smoother'? - as in less vibration?

I've seen revolvers w/ polished mainsprings - I have one. And while there has been some stock removal, it looks like the polisher was simply trying to round the edges and clean-up the surface.
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Old May 14, 2009, 07:32 PM   #25
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philthephlier, initially you had me thinking, "Oh BS". But you talked it up so well that now I'm going Hmmmm. Ya oughta be a salesman.

I would definitely agree on the crack prevention and stress relief. The rest of your points, I just don't know about. I think the function of a spring is basically to provide a certain amount of force in a specific direction, hopefully with no peaks or valleys within the distance of travel.

I don't see that your advice could cause any harm if the polishing follows the original dimensions of the material as all good polish jobs should, with minimal removal of material. jd
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