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Old March 26, 2009, 11:24 PM   #1
458winshooter
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WWII mauser

I have an old 8mm Mauser that I need some info on.The only markings on it are PREDUZECE 44 and Mod 98 on the left side of the receiver.On top of the receiver is a star with two wings in a semicircle around a flame.Any help would be greatly appreciated.Thanks Russ
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Old March 27, 2009, 02:51 AM   #2
Snow Dog
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I believe it is a Yugoslavian M48 - hopefully someone with better knowledge will be able to confirm.
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Old March 27, 2009, 07:16 AM   #3
PetahW
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Not to be confused with any of the other Yugoslavian Mauser Rifles, the M-98 is the only one of the Yugo Mauser rifles that originates in Germany. These rifles were used by the Nazis during the occupation of Yugoslavia during WWII, and were captured when Yugoslavia liberated itself in 1944 (the only European country to accomplish this without aid from foreign armies). Another source of WWII German K-98s to Yugoslavia at the time came in the form of war reparations from Germany after the cessation of hostilities.

Following liberation, Yugoslavia's military was understandably critically short of weapons - which was resolved overhauling and remarking captured German rifles, which were similar to those the Yugoslavians had.

Some sellers list the Yugo M-98 as 'German M98k Mausers' - but this is potentially misleading because original markings have been tampered with and as a result do not include the words 'WWII German' in the model name.
The reasons for this involve the arsenal refinishing and remarking of these rifles: original maker's markings and production year have been ground off the receiver and replaced with the Yugoslavian crest.
In some cases serial numbers have added and/or removed, and some Yugo M-98s will bear the 'Preduzece 44' markings of the Zastava arsenal where the rifles were overhauled.

Mausers marked "48" are post-war Yugo-made Yugo 48's on the M98 pattern , since the "48" denoted the year of acceptance - 1948.

I hope this helps you understand what you have.
.
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Old March 27, 2009, 10:49 AM   #4
Wulfmann
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The Mod 98 is one of the few markings left from the original K98k most others were scrubbed.
The Yugoslavs designated German K98k refurbished rifles as the 98-48. Meaning the K98k rifle refurbished beginning in the year 1948..
The Yugo model 1924 8MM Mauser was thus renamed the 24-47 meaning the model 24 refurbished beginning in 1947.
The M-48 was a newly built rifle based on the K98k features using the shorter action of their model 1924 (Action and bolt are 1/4" shorter) and while it looks similar to a K98k it is not interchangeable in parts (Most can ber interchanged with the 24-47, however).

Yugoslavia was not the only country that "liberated itself.
Greece was not invaded either by allied armies but in truth both countries benefited from a retreating German army that pulled out more than being thrown out.
Partisan activity in both countries were the most difficult the Germans faced anywhere.

Interestingly in the Balkans wars that preceded WWI many nations switched sides from one war to the next but the Serbs and the Greeks always stayed on the same side and, I might add, always won those wars.

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Old March 27, 2009, 12:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Greece was not invaded either by allied armies but in truth both countries benefited from a retreating German army that pulled out more than being thrown out.
Not to be too much of a nitpicker, but Hitler ordered the withdrawal of troops from Greece and Yugoslavia on Aug 26, 1944. Germany had its hands full by that time, and US troops had landed in Italy, Normandy, and Toulouse several months earlier, and liberated Paris the day before.

Greece benefitted immensly from Allied troops and supplies. British troops liberated Athens on Oct 14, 1944.

Yugoslav army and partisan fighters received materiel from the Allies (Russia and USA), and ground troops from Russia assisted the Yugoslavs throughout the war and participated in the liberation of Belgrade and Dubrovnik.

http://www.euronet.nl/users/wilfried/ww2/ww2.htm
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Old March 27, 2009, 07:09 PM   #6
Wulfmann
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LOL, didn't you just repeat what I said???
In truth I posted from memory and did not look anything up.

How did British troops liberate Athens when the Germans had withdrawn???

The British moved into a vacuum to prevent Stalin from moving in to Greece as there were two partisan groups; a communist and western which became a civil war Britain could not afford to wage so the US stepped in to help defeat the communist. War did not cease in Greece until 1948, really

The Germans loved Greece and hated the occupation of a place they cherished. Many took Greek in school and of course were into the history and particularly the military history.
When the Greek army surrendered to the Germans the Greek soldiers were dismissed with their weapons (much regretted later) and the Germans did not raise their colors until the Greek officers left the field.
These were the only such times this happened in WWII.

The Italians were livid and demanded the Greeks surrender to them as well.
So, the event was replayed and one would have thought the Greeks and Germans were the allies.
The two belittled the Italians making a comedy out of the surrender farce with the Italians storming back unto their aircraft and leaving mad as hell and Greeks and German laughing like old buddies.
This pleasant relationship did not last long because Greeks have never been known to be very hospitable to occupation no matter who.
However, bad the Greeks and Serbs were in partisan activity they were meek compared to the one place considered the most dangerous place the Germans took. The island of Crete
They didn't just kill you, they chopped up your body. And, there was no reprisal that had any effect on the Cretans.
They were capable of matching brutality and upping the anti every time.

Things have changed little.
Crete is a great place to visit but not if you have bad intentions.
The current problem of Albanians committing crimes in Greece was short lived in Crete with some disappearing altogether while others returned to Albania missing limbs.

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