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Old March 28, 2009, 12:59 AM   #1
roy reali
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Rimfire Reloading

I ahve always heard that reloading rimfire ammo was impossible. I just found an interesting article that might put that myth to rest.

http://rarewinchesters.com/articles/...n_voices.shtml

Read the third paragraph from the bottom. I guess rimfire could be reloaded. Now I doubt the hassle would justify it, but it can be done.
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Old March 28, 2009, 01:16 AM   #2
a7mmnut
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Still not a good idea in the traditional small diameter case. Wonder why we don't use them today?

1. Unreliable ignition source(for safety's sake)

2. Uneven powder burn pattern in longer cartridges

3. Long and fragile firing pin due to the location
(unable to locate a rebound spring along the bolt edge)

4. Difficult to reload/requires special equipment

.....the list goes on..................... -7-
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Old March 28, 2009, 02:27 AM   #3
troy_mclure
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ive seen quite a few guys recently buying up buckets of .22Lr brass. and theres a guy at my range that is pulling the bullet/powder and using his own load.
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Old March 28, 2009, 02:52 AM   #4
Sport45
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From the article:

Quote:
Some of the Henry cases bore two or three pairs of firing-pin indentations as proof of their reloading.
Is this proof of reloading or evidence of multiple strikes to try to get the round to fire the first time? I've left some Remington Golden Bullets with mutiple strikes in the dud bucket from me putting them back in to try another spot on the rim.
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Old March 28, 2009, 07:39 AM   #5
Bart B.
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For what it's worth, there's people in the remote and desolate areas of Siberia and Russia who've been reloading rimfire .22 cases for decades. They cast their own lead bullets recovered from fired ones in small game animals. Pulverizing match heads then mixing them with a wetting agent lets that "priming" mixture be stuffed in the undented rim of the case. Powder's no problem and just a pinch is plenty. A case could be reused several times until there was too many firing pin dents on it to make it worth while. Pretty cheap ammo, huh?

Learned this from a friend who began importing Russian rimfire ammo in the early 1990's after the Iron Curtain came down. He was told about this "reloaded rimfire" stuff by the managers of the ammo plant in Klimovsk about 35 miles south of Moscow. Finally, folks in the USA could get some of that excellent match grade rimfire ammo the Soviet Bloc used to win international competition (Olympics, etc.) setting world records along the way.

Last edited by Bart B.; March 28, 2009 at 07:45 AM.
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Old March 28, 2009, 08:23 AM   #6
roy reali
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What I'm Saying

The point I was trying to make is that it is not impossible to reload rimfire rounds. Difficult and dangerous, yes, completely impossible, no.
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Old March 28, 2009, 08:57 AM   #7
Mike Irwin
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Nope, it's certainly not impossible.

Not very logical, though.

"Is this proof of reloading or evidence of multiple strikes to try to get the round to fire the first time?"

I would say that you're 100% on target with that question, Sport. The whole reason for the dual firing pin in the first place was to make the chance of the iffy priming in the early rimfires going off a bit better.

Someone having a misfire the first time around may well have simply pocketed the round and then loaded it again. I've seen early unfired rimfire cartridges that have multiple firing pin indentations in them, and I sincerely doubt that it was due to the case being reloaded.
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Old March 28, 2009, 09:32 AM   #8
lizziedog1
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There are folks that reload rimfire bullets. Bill Eichelberger takes .22 long cartridges and changes them to different calibers. The only thing that doesn't get changed is the primer. Basically he reforms the cases to micro-calibers. One of his cartridges is called the 10 Eichelberger Long Rifle.

It is based on a necked dwon .22 long rifle case. It fires a 7.2 grain bullet at a bit over 2100 feet per second. How usefull this is can be debated.
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Old March 28, 2009, 11:18 AM   #9
Mike Irwin
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I've seen Eichelberger's stuff. VERY funny looking cartridges.

But, this thread is really talking about reloading fired rimfire cases.
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Old March 28, 2009, 01:19 PM   #10
FrankenMauser
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Quote:
ive seen quite a few guys recently buying up buckets of .22Lr brass...
They're most likely selling it for scrap...

Or, using the shell casings for bullet jackets.



It is definitely possible to reload rimfire ammo, but there are many risks and a lot of time involved.
One of the most over-looked risks, is that of a pierced rim. If the first time the cartridge was fired, the rim was pierced... The second time it is fired, you are going to get some nice hot gasses escaping. Should this pierced-rim-round be fired in a recoil operated auto-loader; you're likely to end up with a ruptured case.
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