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Old February 27, 2015, 08:17 PM   #1
stagpanther
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Progressive lens vs bifocal

After many years of deteriorating vision I finally took the plunge and went in for full tests and,as I suspected, I have major far-sighted problems (can't see irons in focus at all). My insurance does not pay for this sort of thing or glasses, and the optometrist I went to started sounding like a car dealership when discussing glasses--they recommended some progressive lenses with anti-glare coat with a total bill that would come in at about $700.00. I said I'll think about it and went down the street to a Our Eyes located in a WalMart where I could have either progressive or bifocals--including anti-glare and transition lenses all for $245. I told them shooting was a specific need--and they said progressive lenses tend to distort on the periphery--kinda like parallax, I guess. I went ahead and ordered the bifocals. These are my very first glasses--did I do the right thing??
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Old February 28, 2015, 08:38 AM   #2
longspurr
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I wear safety glasses at work. Often I am working at eye level or above. My solution was to get Bi-focal safety glasses, with the close lens on the TOP. The eye doc called this “occupational lenses”.

This happens to work just fine for shooting!! I am looking through the top of the glasses at the sights – which are now in focus.

I had to try twice to get this right. The first prescription put the reading part too close, like reading a newspaper. I had them retest and adjust the prescription so the optimal focus was the front of a fist at the end of my extended arm. BTW, they referred to this as the “computer monitor prescription”. Apparently the distance to a computer monitor & handgun sights is about the same.

I also had a pair of cheap “reading glasses” made in my prescription for the CPU monitor distance. I find these work quite well for handgun shooting glasses. Not the safety of my work glasses, but I use them all the time – like as I type this – and beside my bed.
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Old February 28, 2015, 09:04 AM   #3
stagpanther
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Thanks. I've read so many different solutions--I think what you are referring to is called "inverted bifocal" since the far and near components are reversed compared to conventional.

I've pretty much concluded from what I've read so far that it will be nearly impossible to get one pair of glasses for daily wear that works equally well in shooting, so I may explore some of the outfits that specifically specialize in making prescription shooting glasses. That may more sense anyway if they make the lens out of a high-strength plastic as opposed to glass.
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Old February 28, 2015, 09:34 AM   #4
BillM
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I've gone to what they call "mono-vision" for shooting glasses.
Dominant eye is front sight focus, other is distance. Using
a pair of Bolle' Vigilantes with the large Rx insert frame.
My wife does basically the same thing, but she does it with
contacts. Her shooting glasses of choice are Rudy's with
the photo red lens.
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Old February 28, 2015, 09:45 AM   #5
4EVERM-14
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Personally I use bifocals for every day. When shooting I found single power lenses work best. I also found the correction for shooting was not the same for reading. It all depends on your individual vision but typically you'll need to balance between seeing the front sight and still have enough bull for aiming. Low cost single power safety glasses can be had through industrial supply houses. Low cost enough to have several to choose from for the best picture when shooting.
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Old February 28, 2015, 10:42 AM   #6
stagpanther
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great info--thanks.
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Old February 28, 2015, 10:59 AM   #7
Grizz12
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I cant see my sights very well, with glasses I can see the sights but not the target. I will be switching to some sort of high visibility sights or red dots combined with glasses
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Old February 28, 2015, 11:01 AM   #8
stagpanther
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I really don't have a problem with scopes--it's just irons that give me trouble. I enjoy shooting handguns just as much as my rifles--that's why I'm spending time and money trying to find a solution.
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Old February 28, 2015, 11:02 AM   #9
wogpotter
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As a variation on the "which bifocals for shooting" theme happens regularly you might want to try this.

Google for "grind patterns for progressive lenses" then click the "IMAGES"tab. Its a great source of how different grind patterns are layed out & work.
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Old February 28, 2015, 11:12 AM   #10
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Thanks wog--I'll look into that. You are in a league of extraordinary gentlemen. : )
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Old February 28, 2015, 11:28 AM   #11
Brit
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Well, I just spent $300.00 at Walmart, Progressive Bi-focal's! Anti Glare, tough lens, twist frames, sit on the edge of the bed, TV fine, lay back on the pillows, not fine!

I hate them!

The reading is fine, if it is a book, and I am sitting, looking out of the bottom of the lenses, but the screen of the Lap Top, useless! I would have to lie down!

Walking down stairs, scary. I would like to take them back, to get my money back? But how.

My normal vision is fine for driving, see the TruGlo sights fine on the Glock 19. I had the laser surgery in 1992? The old way, right on the eye ball OUCH, next day, really painfull. In Ontario Canada, took the slide off a pistol to give the right eye measurement, still works OK.


The $1 dollar specials, work for the Lap top, looking at the keys now, clear as a bell, lift head, screen good. (me one finger typist, look at keys to do so) they are 2.75 power.
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Old February 28, 2015, 11:42 AM   #12
osbornk
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I've worn progressive lenses for he last 25 or 30 years. When you get used to them, you don't notice them. I have no problems but I think it is because I started with them. My wife tried to switch from bi-focals to progressives and she didn't like them and went back to bi-focals. My last 5 pairs were the loss leader they advertise and try the bait and switch on. I got a pair at Sears for $99. The last 4 pair (2 at a time) were the special of 2 pair for $99 at Valuevision. They work fine for me.

Last edited by osbornk; February 28, 2015 at 02:55 PM.
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Old February 28, 2015, 11:57 AM   #13
BarryLee
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Quote:
I've worn progressive lenses fort he last 25 or 30 years. When you get used to them, you don't notice them.
I agree even though I’ve worn glasses most of my life I just had to start with progressive bifocals about a year ago. At first I hated them, but after a few days I forgot all about them. I suppose my brain simply adapted and I just instinctively look through the appropriate portion of the lens without thinking about it. This also holds true for shooting I just simply focus on the sites and don’t give my glasses a second thought. I realize no two individuals are the same, but if you aren’t careful by fixating on anything you can make it a problem.
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Old February 28, 2015, 12:16 PM   #14
Buzzard Bait
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yes

I have progressive lenses and there great. I guess it makes you sort of a bobble head because you learn to move you head up and down to look through the part of the lens that gives you focus at the distance you are looking at. But it becomes natural to you pretty quickly you just subconsciously know what part to look through to see what your looking at.

Last edited by Buzzard Bait; February 28, 2015 at 09:52 PM. Reason: because
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Old February 28, 2015, 05:03 PM   #15
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I have been using progressive lenses for years and do not notice a difference shooting a gun. I shoot a recurve bow without any sights and the progressive glasses really screwed up my depth perception when I use it.
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Old February 28, 2015, 05:10 PM   #16
wogpotter
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There's a process of acclimatization with any progressive lens. You basically move the head, not the eye.
If you've used night vision its a similar process.
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Old March 2, 2015, 04:22 PM   #17
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Been wearing progressives for about 20 years. High index Polycarbonate lenses. Run about $350/pair at local discount shop. Seem to work fine for shooting. But they DO take getting used to. You have to point your nose at what you want to see. Until you try to wire a ceiling light fixture. Ugh! That's when I need to occupational version.
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Old March 2, 2015, 04:55 PM   #18
stagpanther
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The good news is that I have 60 days to try out the lenses I did order--and if I don't like em I can exchange them for progressives at no cost. I was wondering about plastic vs glass--my problem is that I tend to be rough on things--and every plastic lens glasses I've had I eventually screw up with scratches.
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Old March 2, 2015, 05:16 PM   #19
wogpotter
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You & me both.
Glass, put up with the weight.
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Old March 2, 2015, 08:13 PM   #20
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I hope your choice works out for you. I use progressives, but for handgun shooting, I use my "computer glasses". My computer glasses have the focal point adjusted to about arms length which just so happens is where you hold a handgun. Target is fuzzy, front sight is in pretty good focus. These are not progressives and much cheaper.

But I will say that progressives work the best for my all around wear and I had no adjustment period.
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Old March 2, 2015, 10:39 PM   #21
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For me it was like someone threw a switch. On my 45th birthday (just a few short years ago), I realized there were two 1" orange glow dots slightly overlapping on my targets at 100 yards. The rifle wasn't shooting like it used to. Also the vertical cross-hair in my scopes was thinner than the horizontal. Astigmatism. I tried to have a prescription pair of glasses made but it has never worked out. I shoot mainly irons. I get by. Also as I put on weight and drink more, I find that while the long-sightedness hasn't changed much, the astigmatism has all but gone away. Just sayin'.
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Old March 2, 2015, 11:41 PM   #22
stagpanther
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Astigmatism is exactly what I was diagnosed as having.
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Old Yesterday, 12:42 AM   #23
Sweet Shooter
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So of course I'm slightly joking about putting on weight and drinking. But I do feel like the astigmatism part of my prescription has gotten somewhat better without glasses. I can't stand wearing them. I wear magnifiers for reading indoors, but when I shoot, and I know this is a "no-no", but I can't even see right with regular shades anymore, so don't wear any. Bright sun out in the desert and I'm fine. In the shade at the range it's a struggle. I was "training" for a while and I was down to a 130 Lbs. I'm convinced it effected my eyes (among other things). Now I'm back up to a normal weight (150-ish) and things have improved.
Not sure if that's helpful.
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