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Old December 5, 2016, 01:48 PM   #1
SC4006
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Am I considered few and far between?

As humans, we of course have our preferences with just about anything. We have our preferred auto maker, preferred vehicle type, preferred music, preferred food, etc. Guns come as no exception to this. Some have broad preferences like wood & steel over polymer, some more specific preferences like action type... Many both.

I am going to make a generalization when I say this, but it seems like the older generation prefers wood & steel guns, while the younger generation prefers more modern polymer "tacticool" guns. Keep in mind I am using the terms younger and older generation loosely.

Well I am part of the younger generation (I'm 22), but I don't fit into my own generalization. I think I really do like just about any type of gun. I find just as much interest in a classic wood & steel gun as I do a modern dressed up tactical gun. I want to own a Krag-Jorgensen rifle just as much as I do an armalite AR30 with all of the tactical stuff.

I certainly do find beauty in a rifle with a nice wood stock like many of you do. My M1 Garand with its oiled walnut stock is easily the best piece of eye candy in my collection. I also think tactical looking rifles with polymer stocks are pleasing to look at however. Maybe not beautiful, just good looking to me in their own way.

Anyone else just like all guns?
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Old December 5, 2016, 01:57 PM   #2
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I appreciate all types of guns, especially wood and steel. But, in my mind, I try to justify all my possessions, whether it's realistic or not. I end up with only utilitarian guns. ARs fit the definition of utility in my mind. I have no so-called safe queens, but that doesn't mean I don't like them or want them.
I wish I had some collector guns, but mine only have value to me.
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Old December 5, 2016, 02:17 PM   #3
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No, you're pretty much normal I would say. I like a lot of different guns. Oh and by-the-way, thanks for putting me in the "younger generation" where in a few weeks I might go to the range with my Walther PPQ polymer pistol to celebrate my 64th birthday!

I have always had some interest in all guns, although there are some I will never own or even like to shoot (i.e. revolvers); there are other guns I never thought I would like that I like a LOT now (e.g. single-shot bolt-action rifles).

Don't be surprised if your interests change. You might like a certain kind of gun now, but later your interests might migrate to something a little different. I used to think the only kind of rifle to buy was a semi-automatic. After doing that and owning a few, I started taking an interest in bolt-action rifles and even pellet rifles! If that happens to you, you still are not weird or "few and far between." It happens to many of us.

Not the subject of your post but related, your interests in your type of shooting might also change. Mine went from hunting to precision shooting, to competitive shooting, to defensive shooting, to ... who knows what's next? And those changes to the type of shooting can steer what firearm you become interested in having.

I just hope your interest in guns and shooting will never ends. Always keep it interesting, challenging, or whatever to keep on enjoying it!
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Old December 5, 2016, 02:46 PM   #4
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Good points Louca. What I like may very well change in the future, actually it probably will. I hope it doesn't change too much however. I think having a broad range of interests is a good thing for me to have... I'll certainly never get bored! I can tell you I'll never give up my passion for collecting/shooting guns. (Unless the government forces me to, but let's just hope that doesn't happen)
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Old December 5, 2016, 03:04 PM   #5
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Quote:
Anyone else just like all guns?
As commented. It appears to me OP your preference is military grade /battle field and LE tactical rifles. Hey that OK >Too each their own._ As for me I don't have much use for any military grade rifles. (clones or otherwise) I ate slept and carried into latrines such weaponry for nearly 4 years of my life and have long since then realize the only appealing rifles to this fellows eyes. Are those commercially suggested for my use to harvest Wild Game with. Again. "Too each their own."
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Old December 5, 2016, 03:19 PM   #6
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It appears to me OP your preference is military grade /battle field and LE tactical rifles.
Maybe I do gravitate slightly towards those types of weapons, but I am certainly not limited to those. I used military type rifles in my examples, but I like rifles that have never been widely used in the military as well. I have actually wanted a nice Winchester model 70 in 30-06 for a while, simply because I think they're nice rifles. Also, a .44 magnum revolver (probably a S&W model 29 or 629) is pretty high on my list to get someday. Also would like to own a glock 20, which is quite different than the last two guns I mentioned.
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Old December 5, 2016, 03:39 PM   #7
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I was anti-tactical and especially anti AR... I had been in the army for
A long time and I had the been-there-done-that attitude and I sucked. I bashed AR fanboys here lol. But I have since changed and ARs make up the bulk of my current inventory. Only one rifle has any additional rails, but I got the tube at a bargain.
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Old December 5, 2016, 03:48 PM   #8
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As a Life member of SNM-Sons of Neanderthal Man-I am a wood and steel man, also prefer my guns as close to stock as possible, all the bells and whistles and add-ons don't do anything for me. The KISS Principle. With regards to safety, the only real safety is behind the eyes and between the ears.
And I don't believe in using technology to compensate for lack of skill.
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Old December 5, 2016, 05:14 PM   #9
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I prefer the appearance of blued bolt action rifle in a beautiful walnut stock - but I also like the practicality of a stainless steel rifle in a synthetic stock.

I prefer "plastic" or stainless for handguns.
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Old December 6, 2016, 10:42 AM   #10
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A professor in a mechanical engineering class suggested his students study firearms design, for the huge variety of those designs.
All guns are interesting from at least that stand point.
There are no uninteresting firearms.
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Old December 6, 2016, 12:52 PM   #11
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I really do like them all. I guess if I had to have a preference, it would be the Wild West era and military surplus.
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Old December 6, 2016, 01:01 PM   #12
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Primary issue with W.W. II and before milsurps these days is the price and availability. My M1 Rifle cost me $175Cdn when I was younger than you. Was working in bars then. Not a chance I'd be able to afford an AR, of any flavour, now. Never mind an M1.
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Old December 7, 2016, 01:51 AM   #13
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I like them all a little, some a whole lot, and some just barely. I prefer cartridge arms over muzzleloaders, but I have had some, and they have their charm, just not as much, for me as more modern arms.

I've been fortunate to experience a lot of different firearms over the last 50 some years, including some rather rare ones, and military arms not available to the general public.

One thing I have noticed, and not likely something you will run up against for some time, is that my interest in NEW guns has waned a lot.

one thing I will caution you about (besides getting so many they take up too much space) is that there is sometimes a bit of a difference between what is said and written and reality.

And, each gun is a bit of an individual, some have more quirks than others.

Welcome to the hobby, enjoy, and be safe!
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Old December 7, 2016, 05:19 AM   #14
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My interest in brand new guns went away so long ago I don't remember when. That may have been from years of working on guns. Maybe because those jobs were just boring "Bolt on" and order parts jobs. I still buy the occasional gun, but I believe it has been 30 years or more since I bought a new one. For personal use, I have always gravitated towards hunting rifles or the obscure design.
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Old December 7, 2016, 09:12 AM   #15
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I'm 24 and I think I just go through phases...my most recent purchase was a 1967 Ishapore but next I want to do a pistol grip only shotgun. I hate the term "tacticool".. if you'll find a use for the gun (Including fun at the range) then I'm not going to judge you for it!
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Old December 7, 2016, 12:05 PM   #16
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I rather like the term "tacticool". It pokes harmless fun at the entire range of current advertising slogans that use the word "tactical" INCORRECTLY.

Tactical is about what you DO with something, not about what that something is, or what features it has.

you can bolt 67 different things onto your gun that "spec ops uses" to make it look cool, but it isn't "tactical" unless you are USING it tactically.

While I haven't seen it yet, I expect to see "tactical toilet paper" any day now. Can even see one of their slogans, "when you need to wipe out the enemy...."
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Old December 7, 2016, 12:42 PM   #17
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Google "tactical toilet paper". It may (or may not) shock you.
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Old December 8, 2016, 08:45 AM   #18
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The biggest problem I have with new Polymer guns is that I have no idea if the polymer used is any good. Glock has been around for a long time, and it's polymer is proven. But, just because there are 100 guns out there made by other companies that look like a Glock doesn't mean they use the same polymer. Who knows how good those guns will hold up.

Same goes for MIM parts - I can't tell by looking at a part whether it's MIM or not. And, even if I were told it was MIM, I can't tell by looking at it if its any good or not!
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Old Today, 03:02 AM   #19
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A lot of it is probably a question of cost.

You can't even get into a Garand for under a grand.

Whereas, a budget AR is more like $400.

I love a fancy walnut stock, but my wallet hates them. Plastic is cheap.
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Old Today, 04:19 AM   #20
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I do own a "Black gun", but it is over 40 years old. I think the turn off with the plastic stuff for me is the lack of skill or workmanship involved in producing one.
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Old Today, 04:46 AM   #21
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It's funny you bring this up . I thought I liked wood and steel , in fact I do . How ever my collection does not promote that thought . I was at the range one day a couple years ago and had brought 6-ish rifles and a few hand guns . I was meeting some friends to shoot with and some did not have guns to shoot so I brought extras . Anyways this very subject came up and I proceeded to "claim" I love a nice wood finish on a rifle . So one of the others said so what do you have here today . When I turned to point out my guns I quickly realized I did not have one rifle with a wood stock with me . So then I got to thinking about it and came to another realization . At the time I only had one rifle with a wood stock period . Not going to say how many rifles I have but based on the total you'd think I'd have more then ONE .

Heck all the hand guns I brought were polymer as well . I don't think I'm purposely not buying wood but I sure don't have a lot . I think it's I just buy what I want with out thinking brand or style . I have many brands and usually a couple of them . Price and reliability seem to be my driving force when it come to firearms . My son asked me how much al my guns were worth . I told him not as much as you'd think . Very few are high end fanboy models . They're mostly just accurate and reliable . That's worth more then anything to me and I told him as much .

I only have one firearm that truly sucks and that's an old Jennings semi auto 22lr . Man what a piece a junk that thing is . It jams with just about anything you put in it on the first round . CCI stingers are one of the few that work OK at best .

So I'd like to think I like and appreciate wood and steel but looking at what I own you'd never think so .
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Old Today, 07:07 AM   #22
buck460XVR
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Quote:
Well I am part of the younger generation (I'm 22), but I don't fit into my own generalization.
Folks tend to stereotype people and want to fit them all into pigeonholes. Truth be told, while we all have things in common, we also have many differences. Tastes in firearms is one of those things. I have two boys, the oldest is into semi handguns and tactical rifles. The youngest(still in college) is into revolvers and lever carbines. Both enjoy shooting each others. It's all good.
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Old Today, 08:41 AM   #23
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I'm an codger level member and

I like everything. Sometimes its the function. Sometimes its the engineering marvel of machining. Sometimes its beauty and the American flintlock to me is the most beautiful there is (striped wood, relief carved, wire inlay and engraved).
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Old Today, 11:16 AM   #24
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I wonder about myself at 69 years old. I went to buy myself a new polymer stocked shotgun the other day. However, I couldn't resist the beautiful wood stock sitting beside it so I paid more and got wood. I have 8 long guns and all are blued with wood stocks. However, I have the same number of handguns and none of them have wood on them. They are steel, polymer, aluminum and zamac but they are all blued.

I have no plans to add any more in my lifetime but I said the same thing about 10 guns ago.
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Old Today, 11:42 AM   #25
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I pretty much like all guns, even the plastic ones. Granted I'm partial to wood stocks and blued metal, but there is something to be said about the accuracy of mass produced cheap guns like the Ruger American Predator.

But you have to admire the craftsmanship of the old guns, before the days of investment castings and computer lathes and milling machines.

I like to take out my 98 Krag, or similar guns, and study them close. Seeing the tool marks from these mass produced guns made on manual tooling. These were truly craftsmen. They had to mass produce interchangeable parts to build or repair thousands upon thousands of guns to support our military.

They didn't have programmable machines where you through in a block of steal, push a button and watch the part spit out.

No they had to take blue prints, and spend more time measuring then cutting.

Thank about it, loot at the late 1800s when someone would have to make a part, for example something for an 1873 Trapdoor, sent it to an armory a thousand miles away, so some company armor can fix Private Snuffy's trapdoor.

Anyone who can do a jig saw puzzle can build an AR, the parts are cast and will pretty much fit anything. Trapdoor parts had to be machined individually by a guy reading blue prints with a tool bit he ground himself.

Of course at todays labor cost, these guns would be cost prohibitive, but you have to love them, and have total respect for the craftsmen who built them.

To get an idea, pick up a copy of Howe's THE MODERN GUNSMITH, and read about machining sights, making reamers, bullet molds and cherry's.

Simply amazing. I have my own manual machines, and made parts, putting together nice target grade rifles, but it takes me hours of trial and error. Those old guys produced the several of the same parts daily.
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