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Old March 11, 2009, 05:34 AM   #1
N00b_Shooter
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Home Made Muzzle Brake

Anyone here successfully made there own muzzlebreak, they are so expensive down here in Aus. If you have, was it difficult and where did you get the plans for it. Just so you know i wouldn't make it, my dad is a mechanical engineer and has no doubt that he can do it. So making it isn't a problem, i'm more worried about attaching it to a match grade barrel without ruining it, can you somehow do it without modifying the barrel?

Any stories good or bad will be appreciated.
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Old March 11, 2009, 06:07 AM   #2
longrifles, Inc
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Quote:
Anyone here successfully made there own muzzlebreak, they are so expensive down here in Aus. If you have, was it difficult and where did you get the plans for it. Just so you know i wouldn't make it, my dad is a mechanical engineer and has no doubt that he can do it.

Making a brake isn't difficult so long as you have the right equipment. If you have a good lathe (or a bad one that you operate exceptionally well) and a good mill (diddo) or drill press it'll get the job done. At the minimum a dividing or simpler indexing head of some kind is highly desirable so that your ports are symmetrical.

Make your brake first, then thread your barrel. This way you have a better chance of having a better thread fit since its much easier to thread a brake onto a barrel than it is to thread a barrel to the brake while its in the machine. So long as dimensions are clearanced enough to avoid physical contact, concentric and symmetrical it's of little consequence as to the number of holes, the spacing/pattern, or diameter etc. Finish ream your bore diameter to .030" larger than the caliber and you'll be fine. Run your internal threads about a hundred and fifty thou deeper than what you need. Depending on how you thread the brake, this will mitigate a number of potential issues with your internal threads locking up on the barrel threads before the shoulder/face contacts one another.

Crown your barrel as you normally would, it'll work just the same.

Just some numbers to put it into perspective a bit better.

If a bullet is traveling at 3000fps in a 28" barrel, by my math that is 1/1285th a second. (3000X12='s 36000 inches per second 36000 inches per second divided by a 28" long barrel ='s 1285 barrel lengths in one second or 1/1285 of a second barrel time)

A typical muzzle brake is only about 2 to 2.5 inches long so that's only 1/18000 to 1/14400 of a second in "muzzle brake time"

Now short of the bullet "trading paint" with the brake just what the heck is going to happen in that short a time span? I've made and installed dozens of muzzle brakes in all sorts of configurations for customers and they've all worked just fine.

Quote:
i'm more worried about attaching it to a match grade barrel without ruining it, can you somehow do it without modifying the barrel?
Not if you want it done right and want it to look like something presentable. If you or your Pops understands machine work then this will be an easy procedure for you. Support the barrel through the spindle. Use a three jaw scroll chuck that is indexable or a four jaw indepenedent on the front and a "spider" on the back side. Indicate the barrel so that it is running concentric to the lathes spindle centerline. Get as close as you can, anything at or below .0005" is fine.

Keep the crown close to the chuck's face so that the workholding has maximum support and rigidity. This will mitigate any chatter so long as your tools are sharp and you pay attention to speeds/feeds on the lathe.

Turn your thread major diameter for half an inch on the barrel and then start threading. When you get close start test fitting the brake. It should "just" fit. Not so tight that you have to use pliers, but with a nice silky feel to it. If it rattles on there the way a cheap nut does on a bolt then you screwed up. cut it off and try again. Better yet, practice on a scrap piece of steel before you turn to the barrel.

If you really really want to be anally retentive and the caliber is large enough, drill the center of the brake undersized from its finish dimension. Thread the brake onto the barrel after it's been fitted and then single point finish bore the brake to the +.030" dimension I mentioned earlier. This way you are 100% certain the bore is concentric. Don't use a reamer or drill because it is just going to follow the hole that is already there. If the hole is off center all you did was make a bigger hole off center.

Happy to help if you have anymore questions.

Cheers,

Chad Dixon



Here is an example. This is not a barrel that's been drilled. These are two separate threaded together pieces. If you look very closely you can see a slight change in material color and a bit of oil has wicked at the seam where the barrel shoulders up to the brake about 2.5-3" back from the crown. It hides better when everything is clean. This is a switch barrel to my 338 lapua Magnum.


Last edited by longrifles, Inc; March 11, 2009 at 06:32 AM.
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Old March 11, 2009, 06:46 AM   #3
N00b_Shooter
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Wow, thanks very much for that post, to be honest i didn't understand alot of it, but i dont really have to, i will let my dad read it, i'm sure there will be no problem but i'm still worried about the barrel.

That is an incredible job you did in that photo, i wouldn't have even noticed that it was threaded on. I live in Australia but how much do you charge anyway and whats the reduction in recoil you normally expect?

We want to do it on a 7mm Rem Mag and maybe a .308 (This is the one with the match barrel), i know a .308 doesn't kick much but if its easy on the 7mm and it looks good, every little bit of recoil reduction helps.

Thanks again for the great post.
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Old March 11, 2009, 07:13 AM   #4
longrifles, Inc
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Brakes are 75 bucks and 125 to install them. They'll be finished just like the one in the photo.

The photo is a Vaise brake. The ones I make don't have the itty bitty holes around the crown.

Recoil reduction? I've never done formal testing, what I can tell you is they work and they work well. Just make sure you have ear plugs as they do get loud. Some claim to mitigate the noise but the fact is you are exposing a higher volume of high velocity gas to stagnant air. It's going to thunderclap and its going to get louder no matter how you drill your holes.

If your really worried about recoil, get a mercury slush tube and install it in the stock. That in conjunction with a brake and a good "wuss" pad is a great way to tame an out of control rifle.
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Old March 11, 2009, 04:47 PM   #5
N00b_Shooter
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Is the one in the photo removable? there a range near me the i love that doesn't allow muzzle breaks, so i would like to be able to remove it. Also is it hard to make some thing to thread on the end to protect it when the break is not in use?
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Old March 11, 2009, 05:50 PM   #6
Alleykat
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Check with Smith Enterprises for removable brakes.
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Old March 12, 2009, 12:12 AM   #7
longrifles, Inc
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You stick a brass pin in the holes for leverage and screw it right off. Then stick a thread protector on there.
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