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Old March 5, 2009, 08:14 PM   #1
mike85
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remington 770 so far surprised

After reading all the bad things about this rifle I thought I would post my opinion and what ive done just for who ever is interested to read. I decided to go hunting with a buddy of mine to give it a try so I went out searching for a cheap rifle because I wasn’t sure if this was something I was going to get into. Everyone said look at the savage so I went to my local gun shop and they handed me a savage with a scope ( not sure of the model but it had the acutrigger and floating barrel) in a .308 that was $595. Even in there used all they had were 30-30 marlins for over 400. I was honestly going for cheaper. So I took a ride by walmart and picked up a Remington 770 in 30-06 despite its bad reviews. I got it because for the most part in the reviews I noticed anyone who actually owned it said it actually shot well and were happy for the price. Most who bashed it complained about the action said it was garbage and put it back on the shelf, or so they make it sound. Well mine when I got it home I took apart the bolt and polished it. By the way it wasn’t very clean the grease it had on it was dried up in it in little clumps. I also floated the barrel testing with the dollar bill test. After cleaning it up it made a world of a difference in the action. I would have messed with the trigger a bit but that was a bit more than I was comfortable doing. Haven’t shot it yet but I will post what kind of results I get. By the way i have no idea what the previous 710 model was like nor some $2000 rifle so i could not compare. if it shoots good i will perfectly happy for the money.
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Old March 5, 2009, 08:54 PM   #2
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Old March 5, 2009, 09:31 PM   #3
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The big resistance to the 710/770 is the press fit barrel into the action. It means that rebarreling is really not in the cards without some serious work.

Those that shoot them have been happy with the accuracy. One of my squad leaders loves his in 7mm Rem Mag. If you only shoot a box or two through it each year during hunting season, the 770 will outlast you. If you shoot a lot more than that then it won't, but for the price it's almost cheaper than paying a smith to rebarrel...

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Old March 6, 2009, 03:05 AM   #4
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I have a Savage in 30-06 and the older version of your rifle (the Remington 710) in 7mm Rem Mag. I am happy with both rifles for my needs. Both are very accurate (although the Savage is a bit more accurate than the Remington), both are reliable enough for casual shooting/hunting, and they both fell into the price range that I was willing to spend on a bolt gun at the time when I picked them up.

I always hear about the re-barreling issue with the Remington 710/770 models but for me it's a non-issue. I simply have no reason to think that I will ever put enough rounds through my bolt actions to ever need to re-barrel them. I have AR's and such for high volume shooting, and with ammo costs being what they are... I make all my rounds count with those too.

Basically... The 710/770 may not fit the bill for the guy who is serious about his bolt guns. But, for a guy like myself who might run a box of factory fodder through each of them in a year and possibly send a single deer per season to the processing plant, they work just fine.

My biggest complaint with my 710 is that the action on it is noticably rougher to cycle than that on my Savage. For my purposes though it simply makes no difference. On the range, I take my time. In the field... One shot gets the job done. It all comes down to what your intended use is. From reading your original post, I'd say the 770 should serve you well.
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Old March 18, 2009, 09:04 PM   #5
mike85
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well me and buddy went out and sighted in the scopes the guns came with this past weekend. he got the same rem 770 in 7mm and his shot 2 inces high above bullseye at about 90 yards right out the box.

yea i know 90 yards we wanted to sight in a 150 but we wanted to stay safe using the dirtpile as a wall and the configuration of the land didnt work in our favor...anyhow.

mine in 30-06 however was way way way off. first shot hit the ground before the dirt pile. it took about 35 clicks up and about 15 in windage to get it zeroed in. after that was very fun and accurate. i was making about 4 inch patterns and have no rifle experience. my buddy has rifle experience and his group was a bit tighter.

so far im pleased after 40 rounds, no problems, no mis fires, no jams.

sorry for spelling errors didnt have alot of time tonite.
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Old December 2, 2009, 12:16 PM   #6
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A Remington 770 review

This review is to whom may be interested. I can not consider myself a gun expert even though I have a respectable experience with firearms. A couple of weeks ago I got a Remington 770 in 308 (packaged with a pre-mounted, bore-sighted Bushnell® Sharpshooter® 3-9x40 scope) despite its bad reviews I was reading in the internet because the reviews from who actually owned it said it actually shot well. I do not know their experience with firearms but I have some gunsmithing both bolt actions and semis of different calibers from 8mm Mauser, 7.65x53 Mauser, 30-06, 7.62x51 NATO (very similar to .308W) just to mention some. To be fair on the review, I just finisher to test (and zeroing) at the range. Before shooting, I clean very carefully the action and the bore and pre-zero it (at 100 yds) using a laser bullet. Even it seems that breaking-in is not necessary, I did it initially with 10 rounds (cleaning in between rounds), and then every 3 round’s groups (five in total) using Remington UMC ammo. I noticed that the shorter 60-degree bolt throw makes a more handy loading and unloading, as well as faster follow-up shots. Zeroing was really easy, requiring only few shots (actually I accomplished that during the break-in in process). After just three 3-shots groups, group size was 1” at 100 yards (pretty decent for factory regular ammo). Same results when I started using 150gr Remington Core-Lokt ammo (the one I use for deer hunting).

Bottom line, the rifle delivered very well for what is was intended for: HUNTING at mid-range. If I am looking for accuracy at long range, I will spend several hundreds of dollars (is not thousands) in a sniper-type of rifle and not less than $300 as I paid for it.
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Old December 2, 2009, 04:06 PM   #7
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It's funny that when Savage started offering their "Hunter's Package" years and years ago in the Wal-Marts and K-Marts everywhere, folks ragged on them too. You got and ugly rifle with an ugly stock and a lousy trigger and a $10 Bushnell scope in your choice of 2 calibers (.270 or 30-06) for half of what a Remington or Winchester would set you back, minus a scope. Thing was, those Savages would shoot, thanks to them being smart enough to use good barrels. Now Savage, though still ugly, seems to be the cat's meow. My point is, thank you Remington for giving new hunters a reasonably priced option to get started. That's exactly what Savage did so many years ago. Congrats on joining the hunting ranks, hope you have good experiences and the spirit of hunting gets into your blood. Shoot your rifle often, get good with it. You'll soon see why you need another, and another, and another.
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Old December 3, 2009, 07:02 PM   #8
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My only problem with the 710/770 is that for the same price you can get a much nicer rifle in the form of a Savage or Howa. I've seen factory package Howas put 3 rounds touching at 200 yards with factory Hornady ammo and the cheap scope that comes with it. Show me a 710 that will do the same.
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Old December 3, 2009, 07:57 PM   #9
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For a budget rifle I prefer a Marlin XL7 or XS7. I think it's a better gun than the Remington for roughly the same price. I am also a Savage fan and own several of them. I must say when a animal gets hit with some lead you will never no what type of weapon fired it.
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Old December 3, 2009, 08:22 PM   #10
teeroux
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I put my hands on one at an Academy and worked the bolt there was lots of play in the rails and it even binded once when I pushed it back forward. Turned me off to it.

Good to hear its an accurate shooter though.
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Old December 3, 2009, 09:39 PM   #11
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I have some experience with the model 710 in 30-06, which is the model before yours I believe. I picked it up very cheap. first impressions were not great as far as fit and finish but like you I cleaned it up real well and took it to the range. with my hand loads (nosler 155 custom comp and IMR 4831) it shot right at 1.5" at 100yds. and just under 4" at 200yds. The action is nowhere as smooth as their model 700 but thats not what your paying for. I did adjust the trigger to a very crisp 3# ( really after I striped out the threads in the plastic housing I took it to my gunsmith to fix my screw up). Your rifle could be exactly what your looking for which is always going to be not enough for some or to much for others, I think if it fits your needs you made a good choice.
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Old December 3, 2009, 11:56 PM   #12
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Boy! Were some of those hard to read. Anybody ever hear of paragraphs?

I skimmed through the posts and gave up.
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Old December 6, 2009, 04:03 PM   #13
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On my 770 the action real seemed to smooth out after you get all that caked on grease off with mineral spirits. I wet sanded the bolt with super fine paper and used a buffing wheel and polishing compound to make give it a mirror shine. Put some oil on it and it is so much easier to work the bolt. It's real not a bad shooter out of the box, just needs a little TLC that Remington forgot to give it at the factory
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Old March 4, 2013, 04:48 PM   #14
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???

New to this forum but ill post my two cents. I own the 770 .270, bought it for my wife. No issues with this gun whatsoever. People seem to forget that most modern guns are far and away superior to anything that was shot back in the day. If a frontiersman could drop a deer or any other game with a black powder gun or musket, what your shooting today is like bb's to lasers. learn to be a better shot with the guns you own and you will have allot more fun and success. Everyone looking for a sub 1" shot group is a dreamer and not a real hunter who puts meat in the freezer for their family. You don't need that tight a group to bring down big game. Those that hunt deer and elk/moose/bear/hogs know that the kill window is much much higher than a 1" grouping. I say enjoy the rifle, practice practice practice. Become a good shot and the rifle wont matter.

True shots to everyone
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Old March 4, 2013, 05:10 PM   #15
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You resurrect a 3+ year old thread to say the rifle does what you want, then trash those who strive to achieve better than 1 MOA groups?

People don't just dream of better than MOA, they achieve it through practice, training, and investment in the equipment. Maybe YOU are not into that, but others are, and can post the pics to prove it. It is achieveable, and demonstrates mastery of skill and equipment.

Obviously "good enough" is good for you, but folks can have other goals than yours and are equally as respectable.
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Old March 4, 2013, 05:36 PM   #16
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I think maybe that he is referring to the fact that a lot of folks bash the 770 because they wont normally shoot moa groups and its good enough for a guy just looking to fill a freezer. My 770 in 300 win mag with the load i use makes the holes touch at 100 yards. The bolts need cleaning up to be smooth but what do you expect for an entry level hunting rifle for 300 dollars? I bought mine for hunting in foul weather so my rem 700 and 721 can stay at home in the safe on nasty days. The cheap 770 i don't worry about so much.
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Old March 4, 2013, 05:40 PM   #17
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Quote:
The big resistance to the 710/770 is the press fit barrel into the action. It means that rebarreling is really not in the cards without some serious work.

Those that shoot them have been happy with the accuracy. One of my squad leaders loves his in 7mm Rem Mag. If you only shoot a box or two through it each year during hunting season, the 770 will outlast you. If you shoot a lot more than that then it won't, but for the price it's almost cheaper than paying a smith to rebarrel...
and

Quote:
learn to be a better shot with the guns you own and you will have allot more fun and success.
are kind of mutually exclusive- it takes more than a box or two just before hunting season to become proficient with one's rifle. It's not the sub-MOA groups that are important in hunting, it's the ability of the hunter to hit what he's aiming at from field positions, under time pressure. Sub-MOA rifles do not benefit anyone who can not hold to 10 MOA without a rest. That said, a 4MOA rifle in the same hads will shoot just as poorly.......

Putting several hundred rounds down range in practical practice every year will make for rebarreling, eventually. Buy a gun that makes that possible, or even easy (Savage!).
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Old March 4, 2013, 05:59 PM   #18
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???

It wasnt my intention to bash anyone. I agree equipment can achieve sub !' groupings. I agree whole . My intention was to point out that the gun in question is with out a doubt better with the user being a better shot. I dont bash anyone. The previous post about shot position and conditions and the shooters ABILITY play a much bigger role. If you can achieve pass through shots when practicing this is great, but if you are not achieving this I believe it has more to do with the shooter than the equipment. This is the point I was trying to make.

cheers
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Old March 4, 2013, 06:06 PM   #19
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Re: remington 770 so far surprised

Let me say this, after shooting 3 Rem 770s that couldn't shoot tighter than 2.5" groups I was on the bashing "bandwagon"... But this weekend I shot one in .243 and after 4 consecutive 5 shot groups, the results were: 1.3", .68", .87", and 1.14" (all at 100 yards with Rem Cor-Lokt) ....some of them are decent shooters after all.
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Old March 4, 2013, 06:51 PM   #20
SkillTopsSteel
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On a side note, not sure what your hunting for but the 770 .243 my wife owns has been used for caribou the past 2 seasons with good results.
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Old March 4, 2013, 09:58 PM   #21
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I keep reading about folks who buy a 770 in .30-'06 and right away want to have it rebarrelled in 5.6 Velo Dog and are unhappy because that is not feasible. Why do people buy a rifle and immediately want to change the caliber? Why not buy the caliber they want in the first place?

As to wearing out a barrel, that is very unlikely with a hunting rifle of any type in any caliber. Most of the hunters I know fire maybe 20 rounds a year, if that, so it is going to take several generations to wear out a barrel.

We are likely to see more of that kind of rifle and that kind of design and less of the "made for the ages" rifles of the past. The gilt-edge rifles will still be available for those who want and can afford them. But if a less expensive rifle and a "scope and all" package deal lets more people shoot and hunt, then it is a good idea.

Jim
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Old March 4, 2013, 10:04 PM   #22
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Quote:
As to wearing out a barrel, that is very unlikely with a hunting rifle of any type in any caliber. Most of the hunters I know fire maybe 20 rounds a year, if that, so it is going to take several generations to wear out a barrel.

We are likely to see more of that kind of rifle and that kind of design and less of the "made for the ages" rifles of the past. The gilt-edge rifles will still be available for those who want and can afford them. But if a less expensive rifle and a "scope and all" package deal lets more people shoot and hunt, then it is a good idea.

Jim
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Old March 4, 2013, 10:25 PM   #23
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I've actually had reports of OK accuracy claims for the 770 but accuracy is just ONE measure of a gun. In every other category the 770's fall flat compared to similar price point firearms.

Most that have been satisfied with the 770's are the less than a box of ammo a year hunters. If you're one of those than a 770 should very well last you a good long time. But if you're putting many rounds down range do yourself a favor and buy a better gun.
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Old March 5, 2013, 09:02 AM   #24
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I'm going to hurt some feelings here but the 770 is a POS and not worth the money you throw at it. I'm just not a real big fan of any of these "throw away" guns. Not saying to go out and buy a $3000+ rifle but for just a little more than what people put into these junk guns they could start getting into a 700 or higher series Savage and end up with 10X the gun with 1000X the aftermarket upgrades and parts.
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Old March 5, 2013, 09:19 AM   #25
globemaster3
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Everyone looking for a sub 1" shot group is a dreamer and not a real hunter who puts meat in the freezer for their family.
Ok, I misinterpreted this statement as the bashing of those who don't believe the same as you. Glad we cleared that up.

Personally, if all you have is just shy of $300, and that's ALL you got, I'd rather see you in a 770 than not shooting at all. At least you're shooting!

However, like Saltydog and Killkenny stated, for just a little more, you can get a whole lot more gun that lends itself infinitely better to after-market support.
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