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Old March 5, 2009, 07:20 AM   #1
HAWKIN
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++ Building an accurate receiver - Nemesis Arms

http://www.nemesisarms.com/




The concept behind much of the Windrunner series is to eliminate the variables that, while individually can be small, when taken collectively, make up the majority of accuracy issues on any hyper accurate platform. Add allot of components, mate them, mount them, adhere them, bed them and attach them and the chances for complications, instability and the inability to provide ultimate accuracy becomes greater. Remove as many of these variables as possible, rule them out by initial design and production execution, simplify as much as possible while providing robustness, stability and ease of use and one should be moving in the right direction. Windrunners represent one example of what the final product of such an effort would be. It is a different platform altogether, having what some refer to as “monochasis”, and appearing stark in comparison to a majority of the other offerings. Some are uncomfortable with what appears to be a move away from the traditional “receiver in a stock” look. This is a real and completely understandable reaction and some of us have seen this before, in the earliest work of Stoner and decades later, in the world of sniping, with the Walther WA2000. As the traditionalist quite properly point out, there are a host of sniper rifles whose performance is nothing short of astonishing, especially in comparison to just a decade ago. They are, of course, correct. When I remember that when the optics were specified for the WA2000 (300 Win Mag), the effective range anticipated was thought to have been a then remarkable 600 meters! How things have changed and are continuing to change! The Windrunners are a great place to look at some of the current advancements and the Model 06 is the smallest Windrunner platform yet to incorporate those changes.



The Nemesis receiver is completely produced by the Ives, Ritchie team. This is an important point, with the exception of raw steel, there are few deliveries of OPP (Other People’s Product) coming through the back door. Nemesis controls every set-up, every run, every inspection, every line test, every approval or dismissal, every assembly, every range test, everything. This makes for a hand assembled rifle that is truly custom made. The receiver starts off as an 18 pound block of 8620 steel alloy from Castle Metal. They come in looking like rows of perfect silver bricks. No matter, every one is loaded into aVF3 Hass CNC and all the sides are machined to square, again. Now they truly are rows of perfect square bricks. With that, the work begins. Everything will eventually locate from the concentricity of the initial ½” bolt hole. The first operation is to drill four sets of holes; the bolt hole, both side of the stock holes, and the hole that will support the bipod assembly. All other holes and operations will co-locate from this set up. There are seven major set-ups to be applied to the receiver block. That eighteen (18) pound block will eventually have fifteen (15) pounds of material removed, leaving a three (3) pound masterpiece.



The next operation takes care of the front of the receiver. Working where the barrel will eventually slip in (and be properly timed) and the barrel nut will thread, the inside of the receiver is cored out and the receiver’s barrel head threaded ¼ -12. Then there is a tapping operation for the bipod pin. The bipod is one of the few products Nemesis buys on the outside. Nemesis utilizes Versa-Pod’s top quality pan-tilt sniper pod, the model 50. The Versa-pod bipod will eventually slip on to a custom pin that will go into the hole milled out of the lower front of the receiver in this operation. Next, the rear of the receiver is shaped and the cut-out where the bolt handle will eventually rest. That operation can be seen below.



Next, the receiver is turned upside down and the underside is formed and milled out. Preparation for the mating surfaces of the lower housing are all finished. Holes are drilled and tapped for the lower receiver as well as the trigger retaining bracket. The lowers that you see in the finished photos are newly redesigned and is executed in 536 investment cast aluminum. Those cast lowers are then resurfaced in house, holes tapped and galleys for the stock rods are cut, as is the relief for the Jewel triggers safety. The lower provides guidance and the structural support for the AR-15 style magazine release. The Jewel trigger is firmly attached directly to the bottom of the receiver. The lower also provides the trigger guard for the trigger operation.



The sides are then attended to. This would include the pressure relief holes, bolt release mechanism and the hole at the front of the receiver that will support the “time locking” barrel nut. As mentioned, one of the most important design considerations in the whole Windrunner line is the removable barrel. The barrel is held to the receiver with the precision lock-up provided by the barrel nut. The barrel nut will eventually thread on to the receivers 1.290” diameter barrel housing tapped for ¼ - 12 thread. The design of both the barrel and the receiver provides for positive, repeatable timing when the barrel is slipped into the receiver. A spring loaded barrel nut retention button allows for the user to simple screw the nut down hand tight and have the nut held perfectly off of the face of the receiver every time. There is a positive sounding click or, if needed, complete silence as the device can be drawn back. The result is no wearing (the barrel nut stops 1/8” off the face of the receiver), no wear marking and silence and, as noted, absolute repeatability. The last operation to be done is side engraving. All the engraving found on the Nemesis is done in house. For Government and Police purchases, custom “Property” engraving is available.

The top of the receiver has the holes drilled to attach the picatinney rail to the top of the receiver. And with that, the milling is all done, and the receivers are given to Kerry Ritchie (Bill’s son) to have the EDM wire cutting done. The initial ½” bolt hole is finished out to full diameter and the receiver lug path is cut all the way to the back. Durability is insured as the lug path runs the full length of the bolt galley path. When the wire cut work is completed the receivers come back to be heat treated. The receivers are brought to 40 Rockwell and the oil quenched and frozen. Then comes a honing operation to bring the receiver with ½ of one thousands tolerance. Then each receiver is sent to final inspection. If passed, the receivers are cleaned and oiled and sent to be treated with black oxide. Tough stuff this! As it is a chemical impregnation, there is no change in the overall dimensions of the finished receiver. As many are aware, most coating wear off, well this one doesn’t without cutting/shaving/wearing material off as well. One Nemesis receiver has been assembled and disassembled more than 6.500 times and the resulting oxide shows a small wear mark, a polishing, with the vast majority of the oxide holding strong.



That completes the Nemesis receiver. To protect the threads of the receiver a custom Delrin cap is lathed out in house to screw over the receiver’s front. A Delrin cap is also provided to thread over the barrel end, allowing the barrel nut to thread right on it. A typical touch is that the barrel Delrin is also a bore guide for a cleaning rod. There is nothing like being able to clean and chamber and barrel that you can take off the rifle and get to work, all the guide and it’s a breeze. When both caps are used, the receiver and barrel are kept clean. The caps can be seen in front of the rifle below.


The receiver is now complete. Everything except the scope and trigger (a superb Jewel with a unique drop down safety) that attaches to it is made by Nemesis. Next up, now Nemesis makes a custom bolt.

Last edited by HAWKIN; March 5, 2009 at 07:28 AM.
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Old March 5, 2009, 07:22 AM   #2
HAWKIN
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Delrin caps:



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Old March 5, 2009, 08:02 AM   #3
Magnum Wheel Man
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interesting stuff HAWKIN ( though it seems almost like an advertisement )

Quote:
The concept behind much of the Windrunner series is to eliminate the variables that, while individually can be small, when taken collectively, make up the majority of accuracy issues on any hyper accurate platform.
if you were wanting to turn this into a discussion, wouldn't a properly fit, traditionally threaded barrel "eliminate (one of )the variables that, while individually can be small" ??? while the nut threaded barrel ( AR or Savage style ) offers a much more servicable platform, wouldn't there technically be less variables on a properly fit but traditionally threaded barrel ??? albeit not as servicable, but have less variables in fit & function ???

sorry... but the reason I ask, is that I ( along with my local builder & mentor ) are building my 1st long range rifle, so I've been paying more attention "details" that could accurize a gun... & while the nut threaded barrel has been becoming popular in the "match type" rifle, I have to assume that that is for ease of changing the barrel, & less "skill" needed to properly fit the barrel to the action, aligning sights, etc ??? I would think, that with everything properly set up, that a traditionally threaded barrel would have less variables that could go wrong after the rifle is set up to shoot well ???
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Old March 5, 2009, 08:13 AM   #4
HAWKIN
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It is great that you are taking the time to build your first accurate rifle. It will be a very important and instructional process for you.

Definately a discussion.

Short answer? No, all you are doing is limiting your ability to swap out barrels and calibers. I dont know how much you know about the Windrunner line, but they are all fielded and they all break down, "properly fit" is what they all are to the extreme. As to "less "skill" needed to properly fit the barrel to the action" it is just the opposite as you will see below. The standard "square the receiver, square the barrel shoulder, time it properly and wind it down" is SUPER simple compared to what you are seeing here.

Start here, it is a full review of the barrel technology employed and why some are going in this direction.

http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubb...93#Post1014893

The Marine snipers at the Mountain Warfare Training Center at Bridgeport, CA just reported that the Nemesis placed five rounds within 3" at 600 yards and then swapped out the barrel (in less than a minute) and placed five rounds within 6.5" at 905 yards. As you will see when you finish your project, that is one hell of goal to acheive (with a .308). Let me know if you get there.

Not an advertisement, I don't work for these guys, more of an serious technical piece on a new precision rifle platform's construction process. Trying to help the Firing Line readers become more informed on a new platform. How often do we get more than the standard fare around here? Glad you enjoyed it, these threads take time.

P.S. This is neither the AR (gas gun, tube pinned, etc. etc. they don't break down without tools and time) or Savage (1899 receiver break?) style system. What rifle(s) were you thinking of when you wrote "popular in the "match type" rifles"?

Last edited by HAWKIN; March 5, 2009 at 08:41 AM.
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Old March 5, 2009, 12:07 PM   #5
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Quote:
though it seems almost like an advertisement
It is an advertisement. Hawkins claims to not be associated with Nemesis Arms, yet he has all sorts of professional photos and marketing pieces for the company. Sounds like an ad to me!!!

Please don't feed the trolls.
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Old March 5, 2009, 02:52 PM   #6
HAWKIN
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The materials came after alot of begging, the writing came after alot of research and word smithing, the posting came as an act of pure interest in informing. I'm still waiting for the target sets, I still am waiting for the pictures on the new forend, suppressor sets from Ops Inc, Elite Iron, I'm still waiting for the photos of the finished front harness system. I'll get 'em and when I do I hope to write on why they have moved from 5/8 X 24 to the heavier 7/8 X20.

Scorch, sorry you didn't like the piece. I would be curious to know if you think that both the barrel end and the front receiver internal barrel surface should both be hard chromed? Or do you think that only plating the barrel is enough, given that they used a rockwell 40 hardening on the 8620. I had that question answered a month ago from David Ives of Nemesis. Nice guy. I asked if I could post on the rifle, he said sure. He is the President of Nemesis and you can always call him and ask him if I work for him in any way shape or form, heck ask if we have ever even met. Here is his direct line 909-520-5636. He is a great guy, like the owner of ShortRifles.com. I'm waiting on photos from him so I can post on his new rifle soon. So, Scorch, plate one surface or both?

Scorch, I hope you find something you like to read on TFL.

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Last edited by HAWKIN; March 5, 2009 at 03:42 PM.
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Old March 5, 2009, 05:08 PM   #7
Jimro
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You know I'm never surprised at how accurately a Marine can shoot....

Regardless of who made the rifle.

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Old March 5, 2009, 05:41 PM   #8
HAWKIN
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Me neither, need to know how well a rifle will shoot? Find a Marine sniper.


Last edited by HAWKIN; March 5, 2009 at 06:11 PM.
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Old March 5, 2009, 07:28 PM   #9
tINY
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I'm suprised that a barrel extension isn't used. Seems like locking the bolt to the barrel with a small extension could save a lot of weight in the receiver.

You haven't shown your bolt yet. Two lug, horizontally opposed?



-tINY

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Old March 5, 2009, 07:58 PM   #10
HAWKIN
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Great question, for those not following, tiny asks (and Im paraphrasing here) "why didnt the designers use a simular operation to lock the bolt into the barrel as we would see in an AR-16/M16? Why didn't they have the bolt enter the rear of the barrel instead of having the lugs rotate and use the receiver frame as the lug lock up? If they had done that, wouldn't they have been able to shave a great deal of the weight of the receiver off?" Great, great question! One that I had as well.

tINY, the answer is three fold:

1. Pure physical strength required in the receiver for a weapon that dismantles and packs so small. Being a monolithic receiver (stock hangs on it, optics hand on it, rear grip hangs on it, bipod hangs on it, barrel hangs on it) it had to be bullet proof. This is also a remarkable 4 pound barrel. The receiver could have an addition 6 ounces shaved from it by going your route, and it would have worked, but that which held the barrel into the receiver, etc. would have been compromised. Believe it or not, in the end, the receiver ends up being thinner (galleys get cut deeply into the receiver, no transition to a barrel mounted lock-up.)

2. Nemesis wanted to be sure that the two lug (Savage like) bolt would have its lug galleys go all the way through the reciever for much more strength. It was clear that using the receiver as the final galley to lock-up was best.

Here is the bolt in 50 cal and .30



3. Speed to swap out the calibers. Take off the barrel and swap (30 seconds) throw out the bolt and replace (30 seconds or less). Think how massive the receiver would have to be to accept every barrel in every caliber if that barrel ended past the chamber and included the much wider lock-up area as well. There are rifles in the Nemesis shop that have gone through 6,000 barrel on/off cycles. It had to be fast and bullet proof, literally.
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Old March 5, 2009, 11:04 PM   #11
tINY
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Do you actually make that bolt, or just add your handle and blast shield to a savage assembly?



-tINY

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Old March 5, 2009, 11:42 PM   #12
David@Nemesis
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Hey John or Scorch

I noticed that you have quite a few comments on how a rifle should be built, but notice that you do not build any?? Hawkin does not work for Nemesis Arms Inc., he has simply asked a lot of questions and for many photo's as many do here, then he has written very fine articles. Maybe if your cannons were as interesting he might write an article about them?

Maybe you can show me how to build a rifle from scratch and show everyone where I went astray.

Either way, complaining about what someone writes, builds, enjoys or accusing of it of being advertising when you have absolutely no proof is really low!!!! I do find it rather funny that at the bottom of your posts you have your own companies? Isn't that like a double standard?

Speaking of on your web site your have an Ikthus, if your faith is strong you would know that accusations without proof or attacking verbally or other wise without a very good reason or putting someone else down is not the Christian Way. If this is ok with you, you will pay your own price. If you followed the teachings you would support your fellow man.

Thank you for listening and if you do not care for the information, maybe the thread is not for you.

I am thankful that people like Hawkin do not give in to the presures of others that are simply unhappy with what they see.

In the end I HOPE you find what you are looking for.

Thank you for listening,
Nemesis
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Old March 5, 2009, 11:48 PM   #13
David@Nemesis
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Tiny,

We do build our own bolts from end to end. Our tubes, bolt faces and rear lugs are 4140. Our firing pins and sear sleeves are made from S7. They are similar to the Savage.

I hope this helps explain a little about our bolt. If you have any other questions I would glad to answer.

Nemesis
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Old March 6, 2009, 01:19 AM   #14
Scorch
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Quote:
Maybe you can show me how to build a rifle from scratch and show everyone where I went astray.
David-
I did not say you don't build very nice rifles. In fact, if you read on the previous post where HAWKINS was plugging your product, I said that the rifles appear to be very well built, but simpy higher priced than other available platforms, considering the cost savings available from CNC technologies. I will say it again, or you can simply go back and re-read my post in that previous thread. About the same time, there was a thread regarding the Alpine rifle, very similar in appearance and features to my eyes, at a similar price. Posters there felt that rifle is also overpriced.
Quote:
Either way, complaining about what someone writes, builds, enjoys or accusing of it of being advertising when you have absolutely no proof is really low!!!! I do find it rather funny that at the bottom of your posts you have your own companies? Isn't that like a double standard?
I have not complained about what or how HAWKINS writes, he writes quite well, he might even be a professional writer. This is his second lengthy expose on your company. For anyone that missed that first opus, it is electronically stored for posterity. It's just that going on and on ad nauseam about a product no one has asked about is a bit over the top. He presented the product's virtues and benefits, repeatedly. But claiming it is not an advertisement seems misleading. It may not be paid advertisement, but he has been provided by you or your firm with marketing material and product specs and allowed to plug the product, then claims it is not advertisement. I believe it is, just the same as seeing a product plugged in a movies is advertisement.

BTW, I do not own or represent Taylor Machine, but I will speak for the quality of his work and his personal integrity. I do feel that posting a link to his web site is an advertisement, but it is subtle.

Finally, since it appears I have offended you by stating my views, please try to find it in yourself to forgive me for expressing my opinions. I truly did not expect the type of response I drew from you. Thank you for your response, both of them, and keep working on your dream.
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Last edited by Scorch; March 6, 2009 at 01:30 AM.
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Old March 6, 2009, 11:40 AM   #15
David@Nemesis
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Scorch,
First to the statement of CNC Machinery. If you consider that the machines that run these parts start with Milling Machines (5 axis) $60,000 to $ 80,000,
Lathes $45,000 to $65,000 each. Then for the internal parts Citizen Machines starting at $260,000 to $500,000 ea. Yes, this makes the parts faster, once the engineering is complete and the programming is done, prototypes have mastered. However, that time is not free, it is an incredible investment. If you compare my rifle to other customs you will also find that most, probably not all build some components, but most use other companies stocks, barrels (complete) actions. It is very easy to build a parts gun and make money.

I do not know if Hawkin is a professional writer and it does not matter! Are you not a professional in your field? To ad nauseam about a product no one has asked about, simply means that you are on the wrong thread. If you do not have interest in it, then respectively why are you on it? If someone is excited about a product and asked for photo's I send them (CUSTOMER SERVICE) and they are happy. If someone would like to write about my rifle and has asked me many questions so they understand, I help them understand. If this makes them happy, I am happy, but then if they write something on line that does not depict my company or what I explained or stated, I will correct them.

As for marketing materials, I gave the pictures he asked for, he does not have fliers, ads or the approval to use such. As for product spec.'s they are on my web site. Not often does this much information about how a product is made get to the consumer and advocate.

Finally, I am not offended by you stating your opinion, however when that opinion is stated as fact (it [U]is/U]), then I do take exception to it because, what you accused my company of diminish the value of what my company represents.

I encourage all to give input and ask questions to there fullest that is how we all learn and expand our knowledge.

Thank you for your response and I encourage you to enjoy the information found on this thread.
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