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Old January 24, 2009, 01:09 PM   #1
Northslope Nimrod
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Whats the value of a Springfield 1903..original?

A buddy is selling a Springfield 1903 (no scope) 30-06. It has the original stock and has sat in a safe for 30 years. Great condition.

What is the value? He was asking $400
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Old January 24, 2009, 01:17 PM   #2
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Grab it. You see them selling for more than $600 every day.
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Old January 24, 2009, 01:50 PM   #3
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1903

I would like to find an original 1903 military rifle. Just keep in mind there are a few variants. And there is a bunch of different characteristics you have to look for, before you can claim the rifle as being an original. The stock is only one of many characteristics.

If you are wanting to buy the rifle, then by all means do so. But if you are looking for a true original piece, then you better do a lot of research on the rifle. Tom.
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Old January 24, 2009, 02:28 PM   #4
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Can't see it from here, but it sounds to me like its worth $400 unless the serial number is below 800,000. If its the low serial number then its not safe to shoot.
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Old January 25, 2009, 01:07 AM   #5
ZX10Aviator
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cheapest I seen one today at a gun show was $500, most was 1100.. I have one.
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Old January 25, 2009, 01:59 AM   #6
noyes
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info

http://www.surplusrifle.com/03a3/index.asp


for sale

http://www.atlanticfirearms.com/beta...roduct699.aspx
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Old January 25, 2009, 02:28 AM   #7
Beretta16
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Like kraigwy said, make sure it isn't an early '03 as they are unsafe to fire.
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Old January 25, 2009, 02:30 AM   #8
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Make sure the barrel is not shot out, and that all the components are functional. Most of all, be sure it can shoot modern ammo.
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Old January 25, 2009, 05:13 AM   #9
darkgael
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Low numbers

If the rifle in question is a low-numbered gun (# as noted for Springfield made guns and below 286,506 for RIA guns), then it's value is much affected. It could be that $400 is too much for the gun in that case.
(FYI - An informative article about the safety/risk factors involved in shooting low-numbered 1903s can be found at: http://m1903.com/03rcvrfail/.
It may be more accurate to say that some of the more than one million low-numbered guns may be unsafe. It is, impossible, however, to determine which ones. There have been 68 reported failures. The recommendation not to issue (though they were retained as emergency stock) was not made until 1930.
I did read a report of a low numbered receiver that was blown up in 2005. The cause was a double charge of H4227.
From the CMP website -
Quote:
*WARNING ON “LOW-NUMBER” SPRINGFIELDS
M1903 rifles made before February 1918 utilized receivers and bolts which were single heat-treated by a method that rendered some of them brittle and liable to fracture when fired, exposing the shooter to a risk of serious injury. It proved impossible to determine, without destructive testing, which receivers and bolts were so affected and therefore potentially dangerous.

To solve this problem, the Ordnance Department commenced double heat treatment of receivers and bolts. This was commenced at Springfield Armory at approximately serial number 800,000, and at Rock Island Arsenal at exactly serial number 285,507. All Springfields made after this change are commonly called “high number” rifles. Those Springfields made before this change are commonly called “low-number” rifles.

In view of the safety risk the Ordnance Department withdrew from active service all “low-number” Springfields. During WWII, however, the urgent need for rifles resulted in the rebuilding and reissuing of many “low-number” as well as “high-number” Springfields.
Interestingly, there were no reported failures among these reissued low-numbered guns.)
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Old January 25, 2009, 08:44 AM   #10
Jim Watson
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"During WWII, however, the urgent need for rifles resulted in the rebuilding and reissuing of many “low-number” as well as “high-number” Springfields.

Interestingly, there were no reported failures among these reissued low-numbered guns."



Probably better ammunition. A major cause of KaBooms in early post WW I shooting was poor quality wartime brass. The low number guns would handle normal firing stresses, but not gas loose in the action from a blown casehead.
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Old January 25, 2009, 11:42 AM   #11
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I had a low numbered Springfield once. I picked it up in a pawn shop for $120 or so around 1990. I fired several hundred factory and full power reloads through it before I learned of the low numbered receiver issue. I wish I had kept it but I traded it off some years ago. I never saw any evidence of a problem. Fat, dumb and happy, blazing away.
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Old January 25, 2009, 11:48 AM   #12
kraigwy
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I drive my truck about 40k miles a year. I guess I never crashed so I dont need my seat belts.

Thats the same logic.

When I run rifle matches, or high power clinics, and someone shows up on my range with an Early Model '03, they dont get to shoot it. I have loaner rifles if needed.

Guns are cheap, why risk it. Besides its history you are endangering. Hang it above the fire place. Contrary what you get by with those actions are brittle. Yeah they may take some hammering, but eventually something is gonna give.
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Old January 25, 2009, 11:50 AM   #13
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I'm certainly not recommending the practice, just relaying my experience.
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