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Old January 22, 2009, 08:04 PM   #1
Hoxviii
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Need input on .375 Weatherby Magnum

At a local gun store there is an absolutely beautiful Remington 1917 that I've been eyeballing for the past couple of weeks. Well, as of today he has a sale on where all bolt action rifles are reduced, so i decided to give it a look. It's in wonderful shape, nice bluing, and has a Weaver fixed 2.5 power scope with a pickett reticle.

The price he's asking for the gun is completely fair, the only thing I didn't know until today was that it's chambered in .375 Weatherby (I know it's a conversion).

So here comes the question: How stout is the recoil? What other cartridges would fall in the same recoil family?

I've fired a Remington 700 in .416 rem mag before and while I wouldn't claim it to be a pleasureable experience, it was controllable and repeatable to a point (after 3 shots I put it down)

And as for ammo, I reload so the $100+ per 20 for factory ammo is a non-factor.
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Old January 22, 2009, 08:48 PM   #2
taylorce1
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Not a very common cartridge but from what I know it is basically an Improved .375 H&H. With bullets of equal weight the Weatherby pushes the bullet an average of 200 fps faster. So it will be of similar recoil to the .375 H&H and Ruger but a little harder. How much will it increase the recoil that is felt that has a lot to do with how the stock is designed and how heavy the rifle is. I'll bet it isn't any worse than the .416 Rem you shot and probably no where near as stout as the .375 RUM and .378 WBY.

Do you reload? I read that you can shoot the .375 H&H in this rifle. I know you can buy that cheaper than the Weatherby ammo. Once you shoot the H&H case in the rifle it will fire form to the chamber so then you have the brass to reload. Dies will probably cost around $100 so one box of factory ammunition will pay for them.

Another option is to talk to a gunsmith and see if there is enough barrel shank left to set it back and ream the chamber out to .375 H&H. The H&H is more commonly found and easier to find commercial ammunition for. Plus there isn't a whole lot of need for anything more powerful.
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Old January 22, 2009, 09:49 PM   #3
Hoxviii
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Well, on mIdway they have redding dies for $75 but they're backordered. RCBS is $142, but is special order with a 90 day lead time.

Brass is available at $2 each since Norma is the only current supplier.

I think that would be the only issue. I'd want to take it out and shoot it, but if it'll take about 3 months to get dies (i doubt my local reload house keeps them in), then that's 3 months of a rifle collecting dust as there is no way I'd spend $120 on a box 20 rounds.

Oh well. looks like I'll probably pass on this one. It's tough since he only wants $400 for the rifle/scope combo before his sale price, and this specific rifle already has another 15% off marked on the price tag- it'd only be about $300 when all is said and done
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Old January 22, 2009, 10:07 PM   #4
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See if you can get it for $250. I'll bet it doesn't cost more than $150 to set back and rechamber to .375 H&H if the smith has the chamber reamers. You will have a rifle you can use for around $400 then.

Or go over to Graf's and pick up a set of dies.

http://www.grafs.com/metallic/2106

Buy this ammo and shoot it in your new rifle to fire form.

http://www.grafs.com/product/194750

Might as well pickup some bullets while you are there to reload with. But still try and get the rifle for $250
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Old January 23, 2009, 12:12 AM   #5
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Setting back the barrel would be difficult, since the 375 Weatherby has very little body taper and is larger than a 375 H&H at aevery point forward of the belt to the neck. But you can just use 375 H&H in in, like taylorce said, and buy 375 H&H brass for reloading. Actually, I have 3 boxes of Weatherby factory brass for the 375 Weatherby. I could let you have them for $35 a box. Then the brass would not be an issue.
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Old January 23, 2009, 01:43 AM   #6
Hoxviii
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I keep bouncing this around in my head. I've decided to hit the shop tomorrow and give the gun a real good once over. Check the bore, make sure the action is solid and what not.

If nothing else it's unique as it is a conversion gun, and has been pointed out it will process H&H ammo (which is actually cheaper in some cases than just buying Weatherby brass ).

I'd really been in the market for a 45-70 Marlin guide gun when I saw this, and I'm thinking this gun will probably win if it's in good shape. The .375 is definitely more versatile and the recoil of a heavy 45-70 in a light gun vs. a moderately loaded .375 in a heavy gun should be about a wash after running the numbers, with the .375 having more umph behind it.
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Old January 23, 2009, 06:58 AM   #7
taylorce1
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Quote:
Setting back the barrel would be difficult, since the 375 Weatherby has very little body taper and is larger than a 375 H&H at aevery point forward of the belt to the neck.
Thanks Scorch, I didn't know if it was feasible or not.

The 1917 action should be plenty solid. They are one of the strongest actions ever produced. The .375 is a great caliber to shoot. I'd been wanting an H&H but couldn't find one in my price range so I re-barreled a M70 to .375 Ruger since I couldn't build an H&H on the action I had. I don't regret my decision for one moment.

Last edited by taylorce1; January 23, 2009 at 07:04 AM.
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Old January 26, 2009, 09:18 AM   #8
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So do you have a .375 Bee or not?
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Old January 26, 2009, 11:43 PM   #9
Hoxviii
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Nah, I knew it was a conversion so I spent a lot of time looking it over. The shop had a box of 375 H&H in stock so the guy let me go out back and load and chamber a round. The gun was real smooth running the bolt empty, but once a round was in the magazine it was kindy iffy in feeding. It flet gritty and most of the time it fed fine, but every now and then it would feed crookedly and jam.

Now this may be since i was trying to load an H&H into a weatherby, or it could have been because there was something up with the conversion and the feed mechanism. I wasn't willing to risk it on a used rifle that would cost me $120 for a box of bullets just to make sure it worked correctly before picking up all of the reloading gear.

Instead I wound up with an 1895 45-70 that I'd been looking at anyway. It's not as unique as the "weatherby-ed" enfield, but will do everything I was looking for a rifle to do which was kill anything that I want up to 100 yards with the right load.
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