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Old January 9, 2009, 09:01 AM   #1
chadflys
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Shooting Goals? Iron Sights? and Future?

I'm new to the sport. I grew up plinking .22s as a kid, but here recently have really become interested in shooting more. My wife and I just got our LCC permit as well and that more or less got me interested. I expect way more out of myself than what was required to qualify. I understand target and SD are two different types of shooting, but I do know as well that no matter what, the more I shoot the better I'm going to get. I'm the personality type as well that anything less than supereb is not good enough. I went to purchase my new Ruger 5.5 bull yesterday, but didnt have one in stock. So that gave me a couple of more days contemplating which to actually purchase. Next question is what kind of goals should I make to grade my progress? And Where and how should I start?

Thanks

Chad
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Old January 9, 2009, 11:40 AM   #2
darkgael
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goals

Great that you want to shoot more and become, hopefully, superb.
Let me give my very personal take on goals. Try NRA Bullseye competition - also known as Conventional pistol comp. I find that it demands a greater level of precision than other formats. It is not combat style shooting; in a sense, it is not "practical". The targets are relatively small. Outdoors the precision targets are 50 yards away; the sustained fire targets (timed and rapid fire) are at 25 yards. You are shooting for points, not groups or hits and that places very specific demands on how you shoot. In addition, you will have to learn to shoot "one hand, unsupported". If you can do that superbly, then the other forms of shooting - which have their own sets of difficulties- will come more easily.
In addition, using an iron sighted .22 will allow you to shoot the International form of Bullseye with yet different targets and demands.
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Old January 12, 2009, 07:48 PM   #3
melchloboo
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I don't agree with bullseye not being "practical".

It is well documented that accomplished bullseye shooters do extremely well when transitioning to other disciplines.

Speed is fine, but accuracy is final.
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Old January 12, 2009, 08:46 PM   #4
Casimer
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Quote:
what kind of goals should I make to grade my progress?
Most of the shooting sports have a classification system.

For instance, NRA classifications for Bullseye break down as percentages of a perfect course of fire, they're awarded based on a rolling average.

Tyro (no scores on record),
Marksman (360 recorded shots but below the 85% mark),
Sharpshooter (85-89.99%),
Expert (90-94.99%),
Master (95-96.99%)
High Master (97% and above)

Most people progress pretty quickly at first but then stall at sharpshooter or expert.
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Old January 12, 2009, 09:17 PM   #5
melchloboo
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The classification is a good macro measurement. However, I think a beginner should be gauging their progress by group size. Slowly but surely, the shots should be all within smaller and smaller rings.

Do not concern yourself with your pace or how others are doing. Only be concerned if your groups widen. If you reach Marksman in a year or so you're doing fine if you are pretty much just a "weekend warrior". But expect things to happen in spurts, with many hills and valleys.
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Old January 13, 2009, 02:04 AM   #6
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"It is well documented that accomplished bullseye shooters do extremely well when transitioning to other disciplines. "

Where is this documentation? At our club we have had folks from bullseye backgrounds come a few times only to be frustrated at not having all the time in the world for their shots.

As for the origional post, look into practical shooting. It is the best way to prepare yourself for an actual situation where you may have to use your weapon.
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Old January 13, 2009, 06:53 AM   #7
darkgael
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prep

Amen:
Quote:
It is the best way to prepare yourself for an actual situation where you may have to use your weapon.
That may well be true, if that preparation is the OP's goal. Here's the "But"......but not everyone gets into the shooting sports in order to prepare for a fight.
I don't mean that comment in any kind of bad way, only to emphasize that shooters have different orientations as far as goals and motives are concerned. The practical/combat based shooting sports reflect a different mindset than classic Bullseye shooting. Not better or worse, just different and with different demands.
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Old January 13, 2009, 10:17 AM   #8
melchloboo
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1. "At our club we have had folks from bullseye backgrounds come a few times only to be frustrated at not having all the time in the world for their shots."

Yes, this is true in the very short run. But once the bullseye shooter learns only to aim as much as required, they do well very quickly. I know it may be hard for a non-bullseye shooter to understand, but the match pressure is intense. Unlike other sports where its OK to get "revved up", bullseye you have to learn to run ice through your veins during a match. I guess its like golf, and needing to sink a long put to win. The physical and mental skills apply, its just a different way of aiming.

2. "It is the best way to prepare yourself for an actual situation where you may have to use your weapon."

I have guns that are weapons, and others that are sporting goods like golf clubs or tennis rackets. I shoot combat style matches with my revolvers that I carry and use for HD. But my semi-autos are for sport only, Bullseye. They are separate disciplines.

I would agree that a bullseye shooter who never practices combat skills is less prepared, but he is not unprepared. If he practices combat skills as well, he is a-ok.
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Old January 13, 2009, 11:29 AM   #9
chadflys
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"Amen" Melchloboo

This might be the only bit of philosophy I feel I understand. Sorry to be so philsophical too. I'm new here to both worlds in shooting, but my background since highschool has been golf. Your right on with that analogy relating golf with bullseye competition. The other side of me has been martial arts. Right again with the analogy between IDPA and combat. To keep it simple repetition, technique and muscle memory are of upmost importance. From my experience the two different aspects are very much interrelated to become a "true master of the weapon". One aspect of the martial arts these days that is neglected is meditation. In simple terms again, calming the mind and visualizing the outcome of the task. Its what this instant gratification world today finds wrong or frusterating........It takes to long.....Today most of us are "jacks of all trades and masters of none" But long story short....Mastering the mind is by far the most difficult. Its a journey not a destination. Enjoy.......Thanks for everyones insight on my Ruger shopping, sight selection, model, etc...
Chad
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