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Old December 28, 2008, 12:26 PM   #1
Rizzlecrack
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Century Arms CETME

i had purchased a cetme a few weeks back. its a nice gun and fires very well. i just wanted some feedback/concerns people have had with them. thanks!
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Old December 28, 2008, 03:15 PM   #2
Rizzlecrack
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any feedback ttt please
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Old December 28, 2008, 03:21 PM   #3
bigghoss
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first of all it is a cardinal sin to start a thread about a new gun without pics

the only way to make atonement is to rectify the situation immediately

secondly the question is pretty vague. is there something specific you'd like to know? the only thing that I personally can tell you is that it's chambered in 7.62x51mm AKA 7.62nato which though very similar is NOT the same as .308win. It's my understanding that it's ok to shoot 7.62nato in a .308 but not necessarily ok to do the opposite. maybe someone else can clarify if it's ok or not to shoot .308win in a cetme
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Last edited by bigghoss; December 28, 2008 at 03:30 PM.
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Old December 28, 2008, 03:27 PM   #4
jpwilly
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All Century Arms CETME rifles are a roller lock, delay blow back, design with fluted chambers for reliable functioning and are built using a cast, 17-4 stainless steel receiver. This receiver is produced using vacuum cast technology. Each casting is hot straightened and heat treated to 42-47 RC. The rifle is finished with a baked on gray/black paint just like the H&K process.

They are decent rifles and use to be the best deal out there in 2004 you could get one for $300! The complaints with Century Arms are basic quality control or the lack thereof. Generally you get one that works or one that doesn't. The consensus seems to be they are assembled by trained monkeys and its rumored that sometimes they are drunk too. They'll fix the bad ones of course.

The rifle itself is a great design and mags are as cheap as $5ea in many places. It has a long history. Hope this helps!
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Old December 28, 2008, 03:27 PM   #5
Rizzlecrack
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i dont have any pictures of it yet..... will post when i do. just curious of peoples opinion
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Old December 28, 2008, 03:41 PM   #6
Shrubmaster M4A3
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I have had one for a few years and from what I've gathered... I must have lucked out. Mine has been flawlessly reliable and the headspace/bolt gap are well within spec.

The rifle is not without drawbacks. It's heavy, and the ergonomics leave a lot to be desired. Also, if you reload (I don't) it beats the crap out of brass and will chuck it half a mile from where you are standing. I also find cleaning to be a bit of a pain due to the fact that reassemling the bolt and getting it back into the reciever can be difficult at times and the butstock can require some effort to remove sometimes.

On the plus side... The rifle looks very cool, packs a serious punch, and is quite accurate for a battle rifle. The best part when I got mine was the price of mags. Mine works perfectly with the aluminum H&K G-3 mags and I bought 25 of them for $1.20 each shipped in new condition. I'm not sure if they are still that cheap or not but it was a huge bonus when I picked up my CETME.

At any rate... The Century builds can be (and usually are) a crap shoot. I've heard of Century CETME's that were unsafe to shoot the day they were purchased due to headspacing issues from the factory. I've also heard of terribly inaccurate rifles due to canted sights. In some cases, I've heard that H&K mags won't seat properly without doing some Dremel work on either the rifle reciever or on each individual mag.

Basically, if you got a good one.... It's a great deal on a rifle that will hold its own against the more expensive H&K's/PTR's although it will never be as nicely finished or fitted. In the end, it's all a matter of what day of the week your CETME was built on. Good luck with yours.
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Old December 28, 2008, 03:42 PM   #7
noyes
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century arms i have several with no problems



this is interesting tho

http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2003/libe...030331-04.html




Me and Century International Arms:
A Capitalist Response to Producers of Junk





I have decided to destroy a company. It's not a decision which I have made lightly, nor do I believe it will be easy. I may not succeed, but I will try, and at the very least I will do them major damage. I do this not simply because they sold me a defective weapon. I do this not because they made me mad, which they have. No, I do this because I feel that it is my duty as a capitalist. I know that sounds funny, but I will explain that in a moment.

This story starts back around Christmas of the year 2000. I got a rifle, not just any rifle, but a Spanish CETME rifle, the kind of evil black implement of destruction which haunt the nightmares of the statist vermin who currently infest the halls of power in America (and with a damn pretty set of wood stocks, ta boot). Unfortunately, living in the People's Democratic Republic of Michigan, just spitting distance (I ought know, I do it a lot) from that den of Socialist inequity known as Detroit. There is almost no place where one can shoot a rifle. Most of the ranges in this area have been shut down by the EPA.

Yes, that's right, the Environmental Protection Agency, for those of you who don't know the scam, I'll explain. The EPA goes to the owner of the range and informs them that their property is contaminated with lead (gasp!). The owner is then informed that they can continue to operate but that they need to tear down everything on the range, dig up the ground to a depth of six feet and have it hauled off to a toxic-waste dump, all at a cost of several million dollars. However, if the owner agrees to close down, then they only need to dig up the backstops and it can go to a low-grade waste dump which only costs a few hundred- thousand. Guess which option the owners take? I happen to know one indoor range which, despite having been completely rebuilt mere weeks before, with not one round having been fired, was ordered to gut the whole place and rebuild it again.

But I digress. Between the lack of available ranges and available time and money on my part, it was almost a year and a half before I managed to fire my weapon. Now, shortly after I got the rifle, I had to send it back for repair as the magazine release was defective, but the company, Century International Arms, fixed it and returned it. Then came my day on the range, and a cold rainy day it was, typical of a Michigan summer, just before it gets hot and muggy. I paid my eleven bucks for an hour of shooting and proceeded to hit absolutely nothing. Now lest you think that I just can't shoot, I fired 40 rounds at a pistol target (that's a fairly large target for you less informed readers) 50 meters away from a shooting rest. I could have thrown the bullets and hit the damn thing.

I got home and checked my rifle. That was when I noticed that the rear sight was not as it should be. For those who have never seen the CETME, the rear sight is referred to as a 'Paddle Wheel', it has a 4-position wheel like this +, each position has a range from one to four hundred meters. My sight however did not stand up straight like it was supposed to, so I decided that this was the problem. I further decided that, instead of having Century Arms replace this unit, I would just have it replaced with a better sight. So there it sat, waiting for me to scrape up the money to fix it. Until last week, when I received my new copy of "Boston's Gun Bible". Where I discovered that this sighting problem is by no means unique. According to the author, the front sights of these weapons are very often canted to one side, rendering the sights totally useless. So I snatch up my weapon and find, surprise! My front sight is canted. Well, this put a whole new gloss on the situation.

I went to the Century Arms website and discovered that they only have a 2-year warranty! Well that shouldn't matter, I thought, after all this is a manufacturing defect and one that is apparently not uncommon, they should fix it anyway. So I called them the following Monday, and after the usual runaround (which seems to effect every customer service center in America) they told me;

"Sorry sir, you are out of warranty."

"But it's a manufacturing defect." I said.

"Well, what do you want us to do?"

"Fix it," I replied.

Well, I'll spare you the repetitious details, the bottom line is it's all my fault. I didn't find it soon enough. I'm an idiot for not identifying the problem correctly, and Century International Arms could care less whether or not this rifle works because they only fix their screw-ups if you catch them inside of their two-year limit. Well, that's fine, let them hide behind their warranty instead of standing behind their products.

Caveat emptor, let the buyer beware you say? True, but what does that truly mean. Should I hire a gunsmith to inspect a weapon before I buy it? Should I hire Wolfgang Puck to go grocery shopping with me? Do I need to e-mail Martha Stewart before I buy new drapes? Of course not. Reputation is the key. Good reputation follows the superior product, the better producer. It is reputation, and it's offshoots, trademarks and Brand-Names which are our guideposts to quality. Century International Arms had a decent reputation, as far as I knew. Hell they sell to governments (which should have been a tip-off, now that I think about it), surely they would not sell junk, right? Only recently have I learned that CIA has had more than its share of defective products. My CETME is just the latest in a long line of shoddy goods, pawned off on the firearms buying public.

And that is how I intend to destroy Century International Arms. Not with letters to the mass-media, or my congress-critter. Not by demanding that the government step in with senseless regulation. But simply by informing my fellow consumers. The process has already begun. Right now on a dozen pro-gun forums, people, gun-owners, are reading my little tale of woe and more will follow. This article is only the first of many that will appear on the Internet in the coming weeks, and months, and years. I have only just begun my campaign to educate the gun buying public about Century Arms. Soon I will be found at gun-shows handing out fliers and talking to my fellow firearms enthusiasts. I won't forget the gun magazines either, most of then have e-mail now so it will be easier to send them letters and articles about CIA.

Hell I cost Colt firearms 280,000 dollars by just hanging out at gun- shows and convincing people to by their AR-15's and .45's from better companies, and Colt just irritated me (another long story I won't go into), CIA, on the other hand, has flat ****** me off! And I don't think I'm the only one. How many others are out there? How many people have lost money on the junk this company sells? How many of them will join me in protecting our fellow consumers from this company? Well, we shall see.

Do you hear me out there? Do you hear me Century International Arms? Well, you will! You have ****** off a man with a computer, bad move.
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Old December 28, 2008, 04:14 PM   #8
nimbleVagrant
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You'll become an expert at hunting down and hoarding 7.62X51 surplus. As bigghoss said, you generally want to avoid firing .308 win in your cetme. Some claim to have no problem with .308, some do.

buy as many of these as possible. In my experience they're superior to the steel CETME magazines that come with the rifle. My steel mags work, but it took a lot of tuning to make them reliable, and the followers still occasionally cant. Be sure to tear down and thoroughly clean the bolt, carrier, and chamber. Good instructions can be found here. Keep that chamber clean and a light oiling is all you need on the carrier.

The signature HK slap is not a gimmick. When you chamber a round, let the bolt fly, don't ride the charging handle. The CETME is a great piece of history and technology.
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Old December 28, 2008, 04:29 PM   #9
Lloyd Smale
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stay away from factory 308 commercail stuff and handloads that are at the top of the books recomendation and avoid using brass that has had more then 3 firings when you load for it. Any one of these things can cause brass to break in half in your chamber. Just ask anyone thats had one long enough if they own a stuck case remover! Other then that the couple i had were great guns.
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Old December 28, 2008, 06:58 PM   #10
jpwilly
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There is no SAAMI max for the 7.62x51, since it's not a commercial round. The pressure spec's set by the gov't for the 7.62x51 are 50,000psi, BUT the pressure is obtained using the copper crusher method, so the 50,000 max pressure is actually 50,000 C.U.P. Since the .30-06 is rated at 50,000 C.U.P. and 60,000psi, we can safely assume that the 7.62x51 generates about 60,000psi when measured using a peizo electric transducer such as SAAMI uses. So, the difference in max pressure between the 7.62x51 and the .308 is negligible, and as long as there is no platform restrictions (as with a .308 chambered M1 Garand), they are essentially interchangeable.

On the other hand the chambers are different sizes enough to cause the thinner commercial brass to separate when stretching to fill the chamber.

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Old December 28, 2008, 07:08 PM   #11
Atla
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Make sure the sights align properly. From what I understand they use to have a lot of problems with the barrel being put on cock-eyed.
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Old December 28, 2008, 07:55 PM   #12
NWCP
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A long while back when looking to purchase a semi auto in 7.62x51 I had my eyes on a CETME, PTR, or an HK91. I bit my lip and went for the HK. Never been happier with a purchase decision in my gun owning life. I like the style of the CETME, but issues as previously discussed worried me. My HK is rock solid, the fit and finish is beautiful and it is accurate. The downside? It was expensive when I bought it and those I've seen for sale lately are incredibly pricey. Still, there's nothing quite like the real deal. I'm considering a second, but due to cost may have to go with a PTR this time around unless I can find a really good deal on a shooter HK91. Too bad Century can't get it done. The basic design makes for a really stout hard hitting reliable battle rifle. I wouldn't part with mine and I've been offered a pretty penny for it. If you can find a good CETME it's based on one of the better rifle designs out there.
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Old January 24, 2009, 12:08 PM   #13
Rizzlecrack
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Finally took a picture

Sorry for the delay but here it is.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg cetme.jpg (118.5 KB, 494 views)
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Old January 24, 2009, 05:30 PM   #14
Drakejake
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I have had two CETMEs, still have one. I had to buy a number of expensive parts such as bolts and bolt heads to deal with supposed bolt gap issues. I had to shim the trigger pack on both. My remaining CETME is jamming because the bolt is running over the top of the round. Gotta deal with that. And I was lucky with mine. How many times do people need to say, "You'll probably have to repress the barrel"? I don't like the things. Don't tell me it is just because Century does such a lousy job of assembling them. By nature they run very dirty, are hard to clean, are designed to wear out, are hard to charge, etc. Century takes this basically cheesy design (cheap to produce, hard to maintain) and does various things to make them unusable. If you want a trouble-free firearm, CETME is probably not the best choice. If you are the kind of person who enjoys endlessly fretting and fiddling with your guns, CETME might be just the thing. I prefer the FAL or the Saiga .308.

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