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Old November 21, 2014, 12:14 PM   #1
tangolima
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Broomhandle grip hold

I finally get to own a c96 broomhandle. Got a question after test firing it.

How should I hold it properly? I usually would like to hold a pistol as "high" up the grip as possible to minimize bore axis height. That means the middle finger would touch the bottom of the trigger guard. I found it impossible to do with a broomhandle. The web of my hand will get in the way of the hammer. Sure enough my hand started to bleed after a few shots. The hammer pinched the skin when it was being cocked.

But if I lowered my grip to clear the hammer, I would be holding to the very end of the "broom" and there would be this big void between my middle finger and the trigger guard, and it didn't feel right to me.

Your comments and advice are much appreciated.

-TL
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Old November 21, 2014, 12:28 PM   #2
mapsjanhere
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It doesn't feel right to you because you are used to the modern shooting stand. When the C96 was developed the correct shooting position included a single hand bend arm hold. You can't do that when gripping the very top of the grip.
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Old November 21, 2014, 04:44 PM   #3
tangolima
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I was shooting single-handed with straightened arm and locked elbow. You mean I should try unlocking the elbow? Thanks.

-TL
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Old November 21, 2014, 05:50 PM   #4
mapsjanhere
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I don't recommend it - I tried and found it very awkward. But maybe it works for you.
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Old November 21, 2014, 08:16 PM   #5
4V50 Gary
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I tried one in Germany with its shoulder stock affixed to it. I've small hands and still had hammer bite.
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Old Yesterday, 06:19 AM   #6
James K
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The problem I found with all those shoulder stocked pistols is that the muzzle ends up only inches from my ears and face. The Mauser, being longer and with a longer stock, is a bit better than most but even with muffs the noise and blast are more than I like.

Jim
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Old Yesterday, 01:16 PM   #7
tangolima
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Advice, gentlemen? Correct to hold it low, just wrapping only around the wood grip? Thanks.

-TL
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Old Yesterday, 04:45 PM   #8
Dragonflydf
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I find holding the Broomhandle Mauser very easy, I pick it up, I aim, I fire. It is not like a 1911 where you have to hold in a grip safety. If you can hold it and work the safety and trigger, you are holding it correctly.
Enjoy, don't over analyze it
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Old Yesterday, 05:05 PM   #9
tangolima
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OK I try not to think about it much. I need to stop the bleeding before I can enjoy it though. Shouldn't be too hard I don't think. I just need to realize it is a handle of a broom I am holding, not quite a pistol grip. Thanks.

-TL
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Old Yesterday, 05:23 PM   #10
44 AMP
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My experience shooting a Bolo in 9mm unstocked was quite unpleasant, but I suffered no hammer bite (I rarely do, on anything). for me, the most uncomfortable part was the slot for the stock digging into my hand.

I recommend a light glove.

If you are shooting a stocked one, and get hammer bite, get your hand out of where it doesn't belong!
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 PM   #11
James K
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I never experienced hammer bite with a C96, but that grip is not exactly the most comfortable. We do need to remember that that was one of the very earliest auto pistols, and ideas on what such a gun should do and be had not yet fully gelled. Its bottleneck cartridge and clip-loading magazine are derived directly from the Mauser rifle, which was the Mauser experience base of the time.

I have never quite understood why it lasted as long as it did; it made a bit of sense as a compact carbine, but most weren't sold that way. As a pistol, it is awkward and hard to shoot, sitting high so its recoil seems heavier than it is. I believe Mauser kept it in the line for lack of anything better, though they did try several times to replace it without success. Their main failing appears to be that, while they had several competent designers, they had no one of the capability of Browning or Luger.

Of course its noise and blast are impressive and Mauser certainly emphasized its power, even though the impressive velocity figures were mostly the result of using a light bullet.

Do I like the C96? Sure, as an example of early pistol design. As a practical gun, it was obsolete when a fellow named Winston Churchill carried one in South Africa.

Jim
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Old Yesterday, 11:22 PM   #12
barnbwt
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Those guns are ergonomic nightmares. If people's hands were really small enough back then to properly grasp that small handle, the gun was unquestionably way to powerful in terms of recoil.

From what I've seen of how early European pistols were generally designed, I think if you are getting hammer bite you are holding it all wrong. The high-frame hold with a very firm grasp is a modern thing; the old pistols were held outstretched, with a low grip, and typically with the elbow bent and the wrist broken forward. Not a secure hold in the least, but it allows the gun to more easily 'pitch up' as it recoils. Try to hold the gun more like you would hold an old revolver, since that is undoubtedly what the earliest autos were emulating in terms of ergonomics.

TCB
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