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Old December 10, 2008, 01:47 PM   #1
bryceh12321
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Reloading Kit

Could you guys give me some advice on a good starter reloading kit. I don't need anything too fancy, so don't want to spend a ton. I am going to be reloading 300 RUM, 30-06, possibly 308. Looking for press/dies/manual/guide/the works. I'll be honest. I don't know as much as I'd like about this, but seeing as how this is my LIFE...well you know. Thanks alot fellas.

And this may be a bad question. Don't know if a particular brand is best.

IF YOU COULD COPY AND PASTE A LINK THAT WOULD BE AWESOME
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Old December 10, 2008, 01:49 PM   #2
bryceh12321
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Reloading

Could you guys give me some advice on a good starter reloading kit. I don't need anything too fancy, so don't want to spend a ton. I am going to be reloading 300 RUM, 30-06, possibly 308. Looking for press/dies/manual/guide/the works. I'll be honest. I don't know as much as I'd like about this topic of reloading. But guns and hunting are my life, and want to gain knowledge in the area as fast as i can. Thanks alot fellas.

And this may be a bad question. Don't know if a particular brand is best.

IF YOU COULD COPY AND PASTE A LINK THAT WOULD BE AWESOME
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Old December 10, 2008, 01:56 PM   #3
armedtotheteeth
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RCBS will have what you need. IMO , stay away from lee dies as they are a pain to set up. They dont have a set screw. I have a few sets and dislike them.
Basically, you will need a press,
trimmer
scale
powder trickler
calipers accurate to .001 inch
powder dump (optional)
deburring tool
case lube pad
lube brush
lube
case tumbler ( optional)
media
polishing compound such as flitz
not to mention the dies
shellholder for your spec cartridge
powder
bullets
primers

a manual is also a good thing to have
I like the speer ones, but this will get you started
look at RCBS, they have several starter kits.
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Old December 10, 2008, 02:02 PM   #4
texfar
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You will get a ton of advice on this subject and different manufacturers. My own work is as follows. I am a fan of the RCBS single stage press for gettin started. Still have my original after 25+ years. Have much much more, but that is not your question. Basic powder meaure scale, RCBS, Hornady etc. Die sets for caliber. Trimming tool, hand or electric, your pocket book. Pocket uniformer, flash hole reamer. Case tumbler, your call. Get one of the hand reloading manuals from the leading companies and that will guide you to a complete basic set up. Mine is well advanced, but after 25-30 yrs it better be.

Send a PM and I will give you a complete starter list and where to buy starter sets. Your call.
Ken
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Old December 10, 2008, 02:05 PM   #5
Dr. Strangelove
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bryceh12321,
Check out the "Handloading & Reloading" section of this forum, there's some good info posted at the top for new hand-loaders and if you search the threads there, there's quite a few which answer your question.
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Old December 10, 2008, 02:08 PM   #6
ZX10Aviator
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Lee classic turret kit at kempf. But yes, this has been covered in the reloading part of these forums.
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Old December 10, 2008, 02:15 PM   #7
Horseman
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Try this question in the reloading section and you'll get more answers. That said, try the RCBS master reloading kit. It may be a little more than you want to spend but it's nice enough you will never have to upgrade it. The Rockchucker press is very heavy duty compared to most other single stage presses. You won't be dissapointed.
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Old December 10, 2008, 03:09 PM   #8
thinkingman
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Lee Aniversary kit.
Just add dies.
Don't let anyone tell you Lee isn't quality stuff....it is the bargain brand but turns out very high quality ammo, if you do your part.

Keep it simple.

The most important part of reloading is the knowledge and patience to do it right.
Not what color your press is painted.
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Old December 10, 2008, 03:50 PM   #9
Smokey Joe
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A-HAH!

Bryceh 12321--Told ya, you'd have to be getting into reloading! Glad to see that you're considering it. It'll make less expensive ammo for all that practicing.

Suggestion: BEFORE you start plunking down $$ for equipment, study up. The "standard textbook" on reloading is called The ABC's of Reloading, which is put out by Krause Publications, www.krause.com

Get it @ yr local sptg gds sto, gun sho, order over the I'net on Amazon or such, or the publisher sells it directly.

Covers all aspects of reloading firearm ammunition, in great detail. Having studied it, you will then be in a position to decide what you (1) Need to get started, (2) Want besides #1, and (3) Can wait a while on getting.

Even if, having read The ABC's, you decide to not reload, you will come away with a greater appreciation for what goes into this ammunition we shoot, and you won't then have any expensive equipment to dispose of.

BTW, unlike Armedtotheteeth, I have a number of sets of Lee dies, mostly the collet neck-sizing variety, and they work very well for me. You will get varying opinions on the worth of almost every different piece of reloading equipment there is. (I have dies by Lee, RCBS, Pacific, and Redding. They all do their jobs just fine.)

As to books, besides The ABC's, which is a how-to and why-to book, you will need a loading manual, which is a recipe book. My go-to manual is the Lyman 48th edition, but there are several good manuals out there, and most reloaders have more than one. When developing a new load, cross-checking is a great idea.

The important thing about a published manual is that it is a responsible and recognizable source of load data. The various makers of powder and bullets also have data on their websites, again, a recognizable source. DO NOT use load data from an anonymous source off the 'net, without cross-checking against a recognizable source. Any anonymous yahoo can tell you to load 'way too much of a fast-burning powder. 'Nough said.

Bottom line: Knowledge BEFORE equipment saves time, $$, and frustration. Read The ABC's.
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Old December 10, 2008, 04:15 PM   #10
overkill556x45
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I use a Lee Challenger Breech-lock press (single stage) for .308 win, .223rem, and 45acp. All Lee dies. I've reloaded several hundred rounds for each caliber (admittedly not a lot) without a hitch. My .308 match rounds make one hole at 100yds. My 45's and .223's are quite nice, but I load them for volume, not surgical accuracy.

The Lee stuff works. Just READ THE MANUALS FIRST!!!!!

Here's the kit I bought
. It doesn't come with dies. They cost about $25-$35 extra.
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Old December 10, 2008, 04:30 PM   #11
Picher
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I have an RCBS Rockchucker press, an older Lyman 55 powder measure, a Lyman universal trimmer, Lyman scale, RCBS Deburrer, Lyman and Speer manuals. I also have a flash hole uniformer that removes burrs inside the cases from the hole punching operation.

I especially like the Bonanza Benchrest rifle dies, especially the seating die. They're the only dies I use for rifle ammo these days. The straight-line seating die is a joy to use.

Most of my rifle cases are Remington and I use CCI primers most of the time.

I've loaded for about 50 years, including rifle, pistol, and shotgun ammo and bullet casting.

My best advise is to buy quality equipment the first time, but don't get into fancy electronic stuff; good basic stuff will last a lifetime and can be passed on to your kids.

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Old December 10, 2008, 04:52 PM   #12
farnorthdan
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RCBS

I strongly recommend the Rockchucker supreme. Priced right and has just about every thing you need to reload. The only thing you will need to pick up thats not included in the kit is a digital caliper, dies+shell holders and the bullet fixins....


DS
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Old December 10, 2008, 04:54 PM   #13
TheManHimself
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I have real-world experience that says Lee presses, at least, are not as durable as RCBS. I got the Lee anniversary kit. The press broke on me one day, resizing .223 shells, about six months later. Frame just up and snapped in two. Lee may have a hell of a warranty, but that doesn't help much when I'm in the middle of resizing 500 pieces of brass. I went out to the local gun store and picked up an RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme and I've not had any issues with the RCBS at all. To Lee's credit, though, they did replace the press, and I keep it around to use with their crimp dies so I don't have to keep swapping dies as much.
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Old December 10, 2008, 05:09 PM   #14
j.chappell
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Quote:
The only thing you will need to pick up thats not included in the kit is a digital caliper, dies+shell holders and the bullet fixins....
Why digital, why not a standard dail caliper? I go as low tech as possible. Keep your reloading simple and pay close attention to every detail, every step and forget about all the gadgets and your reloading will be top notch.

J.
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Old December 10, 2008, 07:38 PM   #15
armedtotheteeth
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IM WAITING FOR THIS THREAD TO GET SENT TO (oops caps, too lazy to retype) the reloading forum, but,
to give a quick cost benefit analysis of reloading
For instance say loading 223.
you can go to top brass and get 1000 once fired () brass for 105 $
buy 3 pounds of H335 @ $20 a pound ( last i checked that was $60
1000 primers for about $40.
and 1000 FMJ cheap bullets for $70
add this up, for 275$ you can get 1000 rounds of 223 ammo made up. This is around what Would will cost you to buy wolf or something like it. The brass is reloadable say about 10 times if you anneal your brass about every 3 shots.
I dont know if it really saves me all that much money, but it gives me something to do besides drink beer and scratch my Great Dane. It also gives me Match quality ammo at a cheaper price than I can get anywhere.
It is a very rewarding hobby. I hope it becomes more popular than it is right now, I also hope yalls ( not mine) up and coming president leaves reloaders alone and doesnt implement some stupid microstamping law or something like it. Some of my most memorable moments in life involve me, my dad , and my granpaps sitting on the reloading bench making a zillion 30-06 bullets, or whatever and Bsing about how we can hit a Fleas butt at 500 yards with this new bullet we got at the General store. I fear our hobby is in danger. Pick it up, show your friends how too, and your kids.
Ok Im rambling, Ill go scratch the dog and have another cold one

Oh I have uses both the Digital caliper and the Dial. the dial is way better, and easier to read. You can read the dial alot easier such as how close you are to the needed length and whatnot. plus.. no dead batteries
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Old December 10, 2008, 08:51 PM   #16
stevelyn
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This is the one I picked. It even includes case trim tools.
Shop around a bit, you'll find it for a lot less than the price Tony Soprano posted on their site.

http://www.lymanproducts.com/lyman/p...p_Del_Tmag.php
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Old December 11, 2008, 12:27 AM   #17
Dallas Jack
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bryceh12321, I would start by getting the book "The ABC's of Reloading" by Bill Chevalier and reading it cover to cover. This will give you a good idea of just what you need and how to use it.

I wouldn't get in to big of a hurry to buy equipment. Study what's available and buy the right tool the first time. Also as mentioned go to the reloading section and do some reading.
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Old December 11, 2008, 07:38 AM   #18
JKHolman
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But guns and hunting are my life, and want to gain knowledge in the area as fast as i can. Thanks alot fellas.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -

Bryceh,
as mentioned by THINKINGMAN, knowledge & patience are the two most important virtues of reloading. You cannot rush into reloading. Do your research and read alot of material on the subject before you even load your first cartridge. If you get off on the wrong approach you will be courting an accident. Reloading in some ways is more dangerous than shooting. You cannot be careful enough.////// Also, you would do well to get digital scales instead of mechanical. You can get some decent scales for thirty dollars. Same goes for the calipers. Take the digital over the analogue. Remember, guys, this fellow is just starting out, so hold off on the "I use analogue all the time......" We know you do. Good luck, Bryceh. You will find reloading takes the firearms enthusiast to a different level of firearms shooting & collecting.

- JKHolman

-
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Old December 11, 2008, 04:01 PM   #19
farnorthdan
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Quote:
Why digital, why not a standard dail caliper? I go as low tech as possible. Keep your reloading simple and pay close attention to every detail, every step and forget about all the gadgets and your reloading will be top notch.
For me the digital are much easier to read and faster, just my preference. But if old school is more your speed......Go for it.
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